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The Scorpion Rules

af Erin Bow

Serier: Prisoners of Peace (1)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
4545240,774 (3.66)10
The teenage princess of a future-world Canadian superpower, where royal children are held hostage to keep their countries from waging war, falls in love with an American prince who rebels against the brutal rules governing their existences.
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» Se også 10 omtaler

Viser 1-5 af 51 (næste | vis alle)
This is, to date, the only YA book I have read as an adult and enjoyed. This is because it avoids many of the common pitfalls I have seen in other YA.

The protagonist is not special among her peers. She has no relevant special abilities and there is no reason to believe any of them would not have done as well.

The protagonist only succeeds because of the support of her friends. She does not do anything alone, and relies on them just as much as they rely on her.

The antagonists (including the dystopian government) all have realistic and understandable motivations. The dystopian aspect is lifted directly from history and seems like an understandable reaction to legitimate concerns (albeit not an ethical reaction).

Realistic trauma responses!! The characters actually act like real traumatized people, and their trauma is not used for audience titillation.

No love triangles. The protagonist is in love with a peer. Another peer has a crush on her, but is rejected fairly early on and they become close platonic friends. Did I mention that I loved the depiction of genuine, mutual friendship?

Beautiful descriptions and visuals. I think this book would make a great movie; but even in book form it did a fantastic job capturing the feel of the North American Great Plains, as well as the more fantastic elements.

Real consequences. Everything the characters do has real consequences that are given weight. Nothing is conveniently ignored or forgiven without reason.

If all YA were like this, I would read the genre more. ( )
  Rachel_Hultz | Aug 15, 2020 |
Hmmm, gosh. I don't really know what to say about this one.

I guess I should start by saying, I liked it. The concept is A and I felt it started off incredibly strong. There were some shining characters (Talis, Elian, Xie) and while our protagonist Greta has her moments there was quite a bit left to be desired. Especially, as we are experiencing the story from her POV. The diversity was fantastic and as it should be in a story that focuses on children from all over the globe. I had a love hate relationship with the character of Talis. Part of me disliked how colloquial he was, he's an AI after all (and ruler of the world), but I can't deny he was a fascinating, exciting, and dare I say likable character.

The world building fell flat for me and I would have appreciated some more descriptive language as I struggled to picture the essential elements of the story. I still haven't figured out what Father Abbot looked like, was he robot or human with robot parts? There was a huge focus on the agricultural life of the children and while it certainly helped with the world building, most scenes seemed unnecessary.

The love story was....okay. I didn't really feel the love triangle was necessary and would have been more satisfied had Elian and Greta remained close friends without random kissing thrown in. I understand the importance of introducing a bi YA protagonist but there wasn't enough room in this story for the love triangle to develop in a way that made it palatable.

Overall, it didn't seem like all that much happened. There were very few dramatic moments or Aha! scenarios which allow you to root for the protagonist. Greta was an incredibly admirable brave young woman who could have been more.

All in all, I praise Bow for introducing a rather sophisticated, sci-fi heavy dystopian YA that felt new and fresh...I just don't think I'll be rushing to read the second book in the series when it hits the shelves.

And look at that, I had quite a bit to say.

( )
  mackinsquash | Aug 15, 2020 |
I've been over dystopians for a while. Our teens still LOVE them though, so I continue to read them so I have lots of suggestions for the kids. But usually, it's just a slog (even if the book isn't bad, I'm still just not into reading them right now). But this book. I read two chapters, and I was hooked. The backstory for the world is realistic and well drawn, the characters are unique and diverse, and the tension... I read this in one sitting. It's got beautiful writing, as well as a fascinating premise. The lyrical feel of the text reminds me a bit of Maggie Stiefvater's writing. It's darkness and hope, friendship and romantic love, fear and courage all wrapped up in a story about AIs and political maneuvering and choice. It conveys violence without being gratuitous, and the threats feel real, the danger has stakes. I genuinely haven't enjoyed a book this much in a long time.

Earlier review:

I requested and received an ARC from Netgalley, and I've only read two chapters and I can't officially review it until a few weeks prior to release date but. BUT. This is the first opener to a dystopian-ish story that I've truly enjoyed and wanted to read more since, I don't know, maybe [b: Killer of Enemies|17946249|Killer of Enemies (Killer of Enemies, #1)|Joseph Bruchac|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1379444491s/17946249.jpg|25158974]? I'm SO DONE with this genre, but the premise was intriguing and Erin Bow's writing might just be what I needed to get me out of my dystopian slump. Which = !!! because I need to recommend dystopians so frequently.

Update: IT'S SO GOOD. I'll post a more detailed review about a month before the release date, but you should order this for your library and also for yourself because it is super super super great.
( )
  bookbrig | Aug 5, 2020 |
As modern YA dystopian novels go, this is decent. WLW leading characters, ambiguous morality, and techno-philosophical food-for-thought about AI and government (physicist turned poet turned children's novelist is a beautiful life path).

On the other hand, scattered moments of insight and humour aside, the world-building and premise isn't as inventive and clever as it's made out to be. Instead, there were the expected points of contrivance that forced unnecessary tragedy and ritual for the sake of getting to write those minimum-length sentences of maximum emotion. This became especially evident in the last fifth of the book, where the author lost me. (Oh, and don't get me started on the redundancy of the last two sentences.)

A break, now, from YA dystopia, though I will inevitably return, having learnt no lessons, in hope of a wholly worthwhile novel in the genre. ( )
  piquareste | Jun 3, 2020 |
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The teenage princess of a future-world Canadian superpower, where royal children are held hostage to keep their countries from waging war, falls in love with an American prince who rebels against the brutal rules governing their existences.

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