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Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food (2010)

af Paul Greenberg

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6332928,693 (3.95)1 / 20
"Award-winning writer and lifelong fisherman Paul Greenberg takes us on a culinary journey, exploring the history of the fish that dominate our menus -- salmon, sea bass, cod, and tuna -- and investigating where each stands at this critical moment in time." -- Dust jacket.
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Viser 1-5 af 29 (næste | vis alle)
We tend to credit physical scientists and inventors with creativity, intelligence, and hard work, and hold them in high esteem. "Four Fish" points out that inventions aren't limited to electrical and mechanical devices and machines. Paul Greenberg documents the innovation and creativity in fish farming and those who overcame huge obstacles to increase the availability of many of our popular fish. The book was much more interesting than I would have initially guessed when I selected it. ( )
  rsutto22 | Jul 15, 2021 |
Through the lens of the salmon, bass, cod and tuna fisheries, a thoughtful examination of the effects of overfishing, ill-conceived policies, and domestic farming have had on our last great resource. The decline of Georges Bank and the Massachusetts’ fishing industry have convinced me of the severity of this issue. Highly recommended if you have concerns about the environment and our food stream.
  michigantrumpet | Sep 1, 2020 |
The book is interesting, but it can get a bit slow in some spots. This is a look at four fish that we eat, getting a little bit of history about each fish and a look at their current status and condition. Overall, the basic conclusion is that these fish are pretty much on the way out in terms of their numbers in the oceans and rivers. Tuna is particularly in danger of being lost, and the sad thing is, even if some of us chose not to eat these fish, someone else will be happy to pick up the slack so to speak. For instance, the Japanese are more than happy to keep eating their tuna sushi, which they claim has a "long" tradition, but that is far from the truth as Greenberg points out (basically, the Japanese acquired a taste for bluefin post-World War II. Read more about that in the book).

Greenberg also makes references to Kurlansky's book on cod, which I have not read. While it is not required for you to have read Kurlansky, if you did read it, it may be interesting to compare notes.

Not all is doom and gloom for the fish. There are solutions and options for fish harvesting, but it may mean choosing other lesser known fish that can be harvested in an easier way and more efficiently. Historically, the problem, Greenberg argues, is that we have chosen to exploit, whether by overfishing or over-farming, fish that are not really suited for large scale exploitation. To make the change and move to more sustainable options will take time and attitude as well as taste changes. ( )
  bloodravenlib | Aug 17, 2020 |
Traces the history of bass, cod, salmon, and tuna fishing while assessing the critical state of today's commercial fishing industry, citing the roles of over-fishing and fish farming while recommending specific protections.
  JRCornell | Dec 7, 2018 |
I've now read 7ish popular books about fisheries management, and they're still interesting. Greenberg structures his book around four very popular edible fish, and provides some science, history and wild stock assessments for each of them.

This book differentiates itself in its wealth of information about fish aquaculture: Greenberg describes the early work that went into understanding breeding hormones and selecting fish populations suited to aquaculture and brings several of the scientists and aquaculture pioneers to life on the page. He makes a compelling argument that we have chosen to farm fish that are very ill-suited to aquaculture, including salmon and tuna.

Altogether a good addition to the fisheries management library, or as a stand-alone. ( )
  bexaplex | Oct 2, 2018 |
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In Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food, environmental journalist Paul Greenberg examines the historic, current, and future impact of our insatiable desire for salmon, sea bass, cod, and tuna. He chronicles the overfishing of these species to the point of scarcity and the unintended consequences that fish farming has on the environment and genetic diversity. Greenberg is ultimately hopeful, though, and charts a course for more sustainable fish farming that looks to preserve the planet’s dwindling stock of wild fish.
 
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Fish is the only grub left that the scientists haven't been able to get their hands on and improve. The flounder you eat today hasn't got any more damned vitamins in it than the flounder your great-great-granddaddy ate, and it tastes the same. Everything else has been improved and improved and improved to such an extent that it ain't fit to eat.- a Fulton Fish Market denizen, in Old Mr. Flood by Joseph Mitchell, 1944
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(Introduction) In 1978 all the fish I cared about died.
If you were to go looking for a place where the problems between humans and fish first got serious, Turners Falls, Massachusetts, makes a worthy candidate.
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Only in retrospect and in the face of steep declines do humans smack their foreheads in dumb-founded realization and reach out, Lorax-like, for the last vestiges of wild salmon slipping from their outstretched hands.
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"Award-winning writer and lifelong fisherman Paul Greenberg takes us on a culinary journey, exploring the history of the fish that dominate our menus -- salmon, sea bass, cod, and tuna -- and investigating where each stands at this critical moment in time." -- Dust jacket.

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