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Working with Disaffected Students: Why Students Lose Interest in School…

af Kathryn Riley

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingSamtaler
5Ingen2,326,218IngenIngen
`This is an extremely readable volume and those who work in this field will find themselves nodding in agreement. It is hoped that this is not just read by those like-minded educationalists but reaches a broad readership. It gives a wide-angle view of the problem of disaffection, which cannot fail to cause concern. It is hoped that the recent proliferation of government initiatives - learning mentors, 14-19 alternative curricula, and Connexions, to name but a few - will soon begin to solve some of the problems highlighted in this study′ - Emotional & Behavioural Difficulties `Working with Disaffected Students is an interesting, informative and accessible book which should appeal to the target audience of practitioners and policy makers. The recommendations in this book are sound and highly relevant to the target audience. Everyone, particularly the disaffected young people themselves, should benefit from sound research presented in such and engaging and accessible way′ - British Journal Educational Studies `The book stresses the importance of early (and real) inter-agency co-operation, and of good initial and on-going teacher training′ - Michael Duffy, The Times Educational Supplement `I cannot tell you how much I enjoyed the grown up approach of this book, soundly grounded in evidence, and not afraid to talk in terms of a really inclusive approach. In particular, I loved to hear the clear statements on the need for trust between Government and Schools′ - Education Review `This is a humane and reflective book. One for all teachers, heads and other professionals involved in children′s welfare. It should be compulsory reading for the target-setters accountability merchants, as it demands a very different king of responsibility towards vulnerable children and their future′ - Improving Schools `An insightful, powerful and, at times, worrying exploration of reasons for children choosing, or being forced, not to attend school. I feel that this book is a must-read for teachers, parents and carers alike. If the powerful messages are absorbed and internalized, then perhaps new ways of exploring the relationships required with children who become disaffected can be found′ - Lynne Westwood, Working with People Who Have a Learning Disability ′This book is a welcome and timely addition to the growing body of research and writing on educational inclusion.... It is a rich source of good practice, policies and ideas. Used skillfully, it could be a powerful resource to influence a school′s approach to the management of student disaffection.... I would recommend this book as essential source of empowerment for all who aspire to improve schools and include all′ - Alan J Child, Journal of InService Education `This book provides policy-makers and practitioners with positive strategies for best practice, helping them to formulate and implement policies that will improve prospects for disaffected pupils. The authors encourage inclusive solutions that emphasise working in partnership′ - SENCO Update This accessible book is about pupil disaffection. It tackles some of the issues which confront policy makers and practitioners in many countries and contexts. Education has become a political priority for many governments, and many have sought to tackle the issues of underachievement and failure. But if education is a political priority, why aren′t school days `the best days of your life′? Why are so many students - and their teachers - unhappy with their lot? Most children start school at five, or thereabouts, with enthusiasm and curiosity. Most parents want the best for their children. Most teachers enter the teaching profession because they are motivated by enthusiasm for their subject, or by a commitment to support children′s learning. Most teachers who become head teachers do so because they want to make a difference to young people′s lives. For many teachers and their pupils, education is a rewarding experience. But what happens over the years to lead to disaffection in a sizeable minority? Why does the partnership between schools and families succeed for some, but fall apart for others? Why do some young people reject school and become excluded from learning? What forces the different ′camps′ to blame each other ? International studies have shown that education attainment at age 16 is the most important predictor of future participation in learning, and of labour market opportunities. Young people with no qualifications are between two and three times more likely to be unemployed as their peers, and to be excluded from society. They become disenfranchised by their lack of educational opportunities. This book is more than another tale of pupil disengagement. From talking to parents, pupils and teachers, the authors provide some answers to the questions: - What can be done to realize the high expectations that are shared by parents, pupils and teachers alike when children first start their schooling? - What can be done to make a difference?… (mere)
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`This is an extremely readable volume and those who work in this field will find themselves nodding in agreement. It is hoped that this is not just read by those like-minded educationalists but reaches a broad readership. It gives a wide-angle view of the problem of disaffection, which cannot fail to cause concern. It is hoped that the recent proliferation of government initiatives - learning mentors, 14-19 alternative curricula, and Connexions, to name but a few - will soon begin to solve some of the problems highlighted in this study′ - Emotional & Behavioural Difficulties `Working with Disaffected Students is an interesting, informative and accessible book which should appeal to the target audience of practitioners and policy makers. The recommendations in this book are sound and highly relevant to the target audience. Everyone, particularly the disaffected young people themselves, should benefit from sound research presented in such and engaging and accessible way′ - British Journal Educational Studies `The book stresses the importance of early (and real) inter-agency co-operation, and of good initial and on-going teacher training′ - Michael Duffy, The Times Educational Supplement `I cannot tell you how much I enjoyed the grown up approach of this book, soundly grounded in evidence, and not afraid to talk in terms of a really inclusive approach. In particular, I loved to hear the clear statements on the need for trust between Government and Schools′ - Education Review `This is a humane and reflective book. One for all teachers, heads and other professionals involved in children′s welfare. It should be compulsory reading for the target-setters accountability merchants, as it demands a very different king of responsibility towards vulnerable children and their future′ - Improving Schools `An insightful, powerful and, at times, worrying exploration of reasons for children choosing, or being forced, not to attend school. I feel that this book is a must-read for teachers, parents and carers alike. If the powerful messages are absorbed and internalized, then perhaps new ways of exploring the relationships required with children who become disaffected can be found′ - Lynne Westwood, Working with People Who Have a Learning Disability ′This book is a welcome and timely addition to the growing body of research and writing on educational inclusion.... It is a rich source of good practice, policies and ideas. Used skillfully, it could be a powerful resource to influence a school′s approach to the management of student disaffection.... I would recommend this book as essential source of empowerment for all who aspire to improve schools and include all′ - Alan J Child, Journal of InService Education `This book provides policy-makers and practitioners with positive strategies for best practice, helping them to formulate and implement policies that will improve prospects for disaffected pupils. The authors encourage inclusive solutions that emphasise working in partnership′ - SENCO Update This accessible book is about pupil disaffection. It tackles some of the issues which confront policy makers and practitioners in many countries and contexts. Education has become a political priority for many governments, and many have sought to tackle the issues of underachievement and failure. But if education is a political priority, why aren′t school days `the best days of your life′? Why are so many students - and their teachers - unhappy with their lot? Most children start school at five, or thereabouts, with enthusiasm and curiosity. Most parents want the best for their children. Most teachers enter the teaching profession because they are motivated by enthusiasm for their subject, or by a commitment to support children′s learning. Most teachers who become head teachers do so because they want to make a difference to young people′s lives. For many teachers and their pupils, education is a rewarding experience. But what happens over the years to lead to disaffection in a sizeable minority? Why does the partnership between schools and families succeed for some, but fall apart for others? Why do some young people reject school and become excluded from learning? What forces the different ′camps′ to blame each other ? International studies have shown that education attainment at age 16 is the most important predictor of future participation in learning, and of labour market opportunities. Young people with no qualifications are between two and three times more likely to be unemployed as their peers, and to be excluded from society. They become disenfranchised by their lack of educational opportunities. This book is more than another tale of pupil disengagement. From talking to parents, pupils and teachers, the authors provide some answers to the questions: - What can be done to realize the high expectations that are shared by parents, pupils and teachers alike when children first start their schooling? - What can be done to make a difference?

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