HjemGrupperSnakMereZeitgeist
Søg På Websted
På dette site bruger vi cookies til at levere vores ydelser, forbedre performance, til analyseformål, og (hvis brugeren ikke er logget ind) til reklamer. Ved at bruge LibraryThing anerkender du at have læst og forstået vores vilkår og betingelser inklusive vores politik for håndtering af brugeroplysninger. Din brug af dette site og dets ydelser er underlagt disse vilkår og betingelser.

Resultater fra Google Bøger

Klik på en miniature for at gå til Google Books

Indlæser...

Henrietta Lacks' udødelige liv

af Rebecca Skloot

Andre forfattere: Se andre forfattere sektionen.

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingSamtaler / Omtaler
14,416737386 (4.16)2 / 863
Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer, yet her cells--taken without her knowledge--became one of the most important tools in medicine. The first "immortal" human cells grown in culture, they are still alive today, though she has been dead for more than sixty years. HeLa cells were vital for developing the polio vaccine; uncovered secrets of cancer and viruses; helped lead to in vitro fertilization, cloning, and gene mapping; and have been bought and sold by the billions. Yet Henrietta Lacks is buried in an unmarked grave. Her family did not learn of her "immortality" until more than twenty years after her death, when scientists began using her husband and children in research without informed consent. The story of the Lacks family is inextricably connected to the dark history of experimentation on African Americans, the birth of bioethics, and the legal battles over whether we control the stuff we are made of.… (mere)
  1. 140
    The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down af Anne Fadiman (kidzdoc)
  2. 60
    Medical Apartheid: The Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans from Colonial Times to the Present af Harriet A. Washington (lives4laughs, fannyprice)
  3. 93
    Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers af Mary Roach (VenusofUrbino)
    VenusofUrbino: If you like well-researched and well-written non-fiction like "Immortal Life" then you will also appreciate Mary Roach.
  4. 50
    The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration af Isabel Wilkerson (bunnygirl)
    bunnygirl: personal history and stories linked with the larger African American history. if you were wondering about Skloot's reference to the Lacks family being part of the Great Migration, this book explains exactly what it is and tells the stories of three families in a similar manner.… (mere)
  5. 40
    A Lesson Before Dying af Ernest J. Gaines (krazy4katz)
    krazy4katz: Reading "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks," I was pained by the impoverished lives of people who still lived on plantations in the 1940s - lack of schooling, lack of health care, lack of any kind of decent housing etc. "A Lesson Before Dying" more directly addresses the life of people still living on plantations in the '40s. Even though I sort of knew this, it was an emotional shock to truly recognize that all the abuse and oppression did not end with the Civil War but was still there 80 years later.… (mere)
  6. 30
    The Body Hunters: Testing New Drugs on the World's Poorest Patients af Sonia Shah (legxleg)
  7. 30
    Rosalind Franklin: The Dark Lady of DNA af Brenda Maddox (beyondthefourthwall)
  8. 41
    Better: A Surgeon's Notes on Performance af Atul Gawande (Othemts)
  9. 20
    The Plutonium Files: America's Secret Medical Experiments in the Cold War af Eileen Welsome (barbharris1)
  10. 20
    The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History af John M. Barry (LKAYC)
  11. 20
    The Mapmaker's Wife: A True Tale of Love, Murder, and Survival in the Amazon af Robert Whitaker (sboyte)
    sboyte: Fascinating stories of the people behind great scientific discoveries.
  12. 10
    Life Itself: Exploring the Realm of the Living Cell af Boyce Rensberger (BookshelfMonstrosity)
    BookshelfMonstrosity: Cell cultures are being used to study diseases as well as cure them. Learn about the cell cultures called 'HeLa' in The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, and read about cell cultures' utility as a whole in Life Itself.
  13. 21
    The Wandering Gene and the Indian Princess af Jeff Wheelwright (LeesyLou)
    LeesyLou: If you have an interest in the social and personal ethics and background of medical care, this adds to your understanding. Minority cultures and personal medical ethics are equally poorly understood by many practitioners.
  14. 10
    The Juggler's Children: A Journey into Family, Legend and the Genes that Bind Us af Carolyn Abraham (sboyte)
  15. 10
    The Mockingbird Next Door: Life with Harper Lee af Marja Mills (akblanchard)
    akblanchard: In both books, journalists get personally involved with their subjects.
  16. 10
    The Forever Fix: Gene Therapy and the Boy Who Saved It af Ricki Lewis (krazy4katz)
    krazy4katz: Both of these books capture and humanize the process of medical discovery and the experiences of the patients. Although the authors have somewhat different backgrounds — Rebecca Skloot is a journalist with an undergraduate degree in biology, whereas Rikki Lewis has a PhD in genetics — I think the discussion of the scientific issues and the ethical issues regarding informed consent would appeal to the same readers.… (mere)
  17. 10
    Truevine af Beth Macy (akblanchard)
    akblanchard: Unusual medical conditions and racism as experienced by African Americans in the Jim Crow South.
  18. 12
    The Adoration of Jenna Fox af Mary E. Pearson (macart3)
    macart3: Deals with bioethics and human experimentation without others' consent.
  19. 12
    Tissue and cell donation : an essential guide af Ruth M. Warwick (Limelite)
    Limelite: Scientific discussion of medical/ethical, and other considerations regarding patients' rights and the medical profession's responsibilities on the subject, as well as other pertinent procedures.
  20. 04
    The Dangerous Joy of Dr. Sex and Other True Stories af Pagan Kennedy (Othemts)

(se alle 20 anbefalinger)

Indlæser...

Bliv medlem af LibraryThing for at finde ud af, om du vil kunne lide denne bog.

» Se også 863 omtaler

Engelsk (729)  Hollandsk (1)  Fransk (1)  Svensk (1)  Catalansk (1)  Japansk (1)  Tysk (1)  Alle sprog (735)
Viser 1-5 af 735 (næste | vis alle)
Good science writing. This book raises lots of questions about medical research and profits, race, poverty, education and ethical issues involving tissue and cell ownership.

The beginning of the book was a lot more interesting to me than the end. Part one concentrates more on Henrietta's cancer and diagnosis whereas the end of the book involves the author and Henrietta's family. The author is persistent and fearless in her pursuit of information for the book. Unfortunately the way the family was described made them appear unsympathetic or as one reviewer said "insufferable."

I do wish the author had stressed right from the start that the HeLa cells "taken without her knowledge" were cancer cells. The Drs. did take healthy tissue too but those cells did not survive.

I really like the quote the author used by Elie Wiesel. "We must not see any person as an abstraction. Instead, we must see in every person a universe with its own secrets, with its own treasures, with its own sources of anguish, and with some measure of triumph." ( )
  ellink | Jan 22, 2024 |
I read this during my first year of my PhD program and again just in the last few days. When I first read it, I was saddened by what pain Lacks experienced. And also by Deborah Lacks' grief and subsequent health challenges she and her family faced. Now that I am a scientific program officer, I am further horrified by the lack of informed consent that took place. And how people today think regulation is unnecessary and hinders research and development. An IRB is necessary. ( )
  tyk314 | Jan 22, 2024 |
I read this during my first year of my PhD program and again just in the last few days. When I first read it, I was saddened by what pain Lacks experienced. And also by Deborah Lacks' grief and subsequent health challenges she and her family faced. Now that I am a scientific program officer, I am further horrified by the lack of informed consent that took place. And how people today think regulation is unnecessary and hinders research and development. An IRB is necessary. ( )
  tyk314 | Jan 22, 2024 |
Rebecca Skloot writes a fantastic biography of Henrietta Lacks, the woman responsible for most of the known cell cultures available in the world today. History is mixed with present-day narrative as Rebecca looks into the medical and family past of the Lacks family. ( )
  ohheybrian | Dec 29, 2023 |
Ik had nog nooit van Henrietta Lacks gehoord en daar zal ik vast de enige niet in zijn. Of u moet in de geneeskundige wereld werken en iets met celonderzoek doen, en dan nog zal de afkorting van haar naam, HeLa, u wellicht meer zeggen dan haar volledige naam.

Het onsterfelijke leven van Henrietta Lacks van auteur Rebecca Skloot gaat daar allemaal verandering in brengen. Het is de biografie van een vrouw die, zonder het te weten, een bijdrage heeft geleverd aan de meest uiteenlopende medicaties. Ik leg het u uit.

Henrietta Lacks (1920-1951) groeit op in Clover, Virginia waar alles draait om de tabaksindustrie. Ze trouwt met haar neef David “Day” Lacks en ze krijgen een zoon, Lawrence en een dochter Elsie. Elsie zou in haar ontwikkeling achterblijven en zij groeit op in een tehuis. Later krijgen ze nog drie kinderen, David “Sonny” jr., Deborah en Joseph “Joe”.

Als Henrietta merkt dat ze ziek is gaat ze naar het Johns Hopkins waar baarmoederhalskanker wordt vastgesteld. Ze wordt behandeld met radium maar de behandeling slaat niet aan. Omdat er ook onderzoek wordt gedaan naar kanker worden er zonder haar medeweten of toestemming kankercellen bij haar weggehaald om ze op kweek te zetten. Geen uitzonderlijke procedure overigens, alleen de uitkomst is nu rigoureus anders dan bij kweken van eerdere patiënten.

Het blijkt moeilijk om cellen buiten het lichaam te laten leven en ze te laten groeien. Het is zoeken naar de juiste voeding en dat blijkt een moeizaam proces. Tot de cellen van Henrietta op kweek worden gezet. Laborante Mary wist niet wat ze zag;

…bij Henrietta’s cellen was het niet alleen maar een kwestie van overleven: ze groeiden in een fabelachtig tempo. De volgende morgen hadden ze zich verdubbeld. Mary verdeelde de inhoud van iedere buis in tweeën, zodat de cellen meer ruimte hadden om te groeien. Binnen vierentwintig uur hadden ze zich weer verdubbeld. Al snel moest ze ze over vier buizen verdelen, en daarna over zes.

Dat was het begin van de onstuitbare opmars van de cellen van Henrietta. Zijzelf zou het niet overleven maar haar cellen wel. De HeLa-fabriek was gestart. Wetenschappers zaten namelijk te springen om cellen die snel konden groeien. De meeste cellen in kweek groeiden in één enkele laag tegen elkaar op een glazen oppervlak en het kostte veel tijd om hun aantal te verhogen. De HeLa-cellen bleken niet kieskeurig, die hebben geen glazen oppervlak nodig en konden snel gekweekt worden. Ze werden overal naar toe verzonden en het werd al snel een wereldwijde industrie.

De cellen van Henrietta hebben een rol gespeeld op het gebied van de virologie, bij het klonen en bij de ontcijfering van het DNA. Er zijn miljarden mee verdiend en dat roept interessante vragen op waar de auteur verder op ingaat.

Er is namelijk nooit toestemming gegeven om cellen weg te nemen. De familie van Henrietta is nog te arm om een ziektekostenverzekerin te bekostigen, terwijl de HeLa-cellen zoveel geld opbrengen. Daarom is de auteur de familie op gaan zoeken. Daar heeft ze erg veel moeite voor moeten doen, de familie is vaker benaderd en wilde er eigenlijk niets van weten. Uiteindelijk komt de auteur in contact met de jongste dochter Deborah en later ook met de andere kinderen. Die vinden het moeilijk te bevatten wat er met hun moeder’s cellen is gebeurd;

‘Miss Rebecca vertelt me over onze moeder d’r cellen,’ zei Lawrence. ‘Ze vertelde me fascinerende dingen. Wist je dat onze moeder d’r cellen gebruikt worden om Stevie Wonder te laten zien?’

Zo ligt het niet helemaal maar langzaam maar zeker wordt duidelijk wat het belang is. De kinderen zijn niet per se op geld uit, maar wel op erkenning dat de procedures niet altijd even netjes gevolgd zijn en de informatievoorziening nog veel meer te wensen over liet. De auteur trekt mooie paralellen naar vergelijkbare gevallen in de geschiedenis en het wordt pijnlijk duidelijk wat er allemaal met, voornamelijk donkere, patiënten is gebeurd. Cellen wegnemen is één ding, er zijn ook patiënten zonder toestemming geïnjecteerd met kankercellen om de effecten daarvan te bestuderen.

Uiteindelijk blijkt de toestemmingsvraag vooor het afstaan van weefsel niet wettelijk noodzakelijk en dat wordt helder toegelicht in het boek. Als je voor onderzoek naar het ziekenhuis gaat en je staat weefsel af voor onderzoek dan mag dit gebruikt worden. Toch blijft het een lastig verhaal. Als je de HeLa-cellen onderzoekt, zit daar iets van het DNA van Henrietta in. Dat DNA is ook aanwezig in haar kinderen en men kan aanvoeren dat daardoor wetenschappers die de HeLa-cellen onderzoeken, ook onderzoek doen op de kinderen Lacks. Om die reden zouden de kinderen de HeLa-cellen in theorie kunnen terugtrekken, iets dat praktisch gezien niet te doen is omdat die cellen in ieder laboratorium ter wereld te vinden zijn inmiddels. De kinderen zijn er ook niet op uit;

‘Ik wil geen problemen voor de wetenschap veroorzaken,’ vertelde Sonny me toen dit boek ter perse ging…En trouwens, ik ben trots op mijn moeder en op wat ze heeft gedaan voor de wetenschap. Ik hoop gewoon dat het Hopkins en een paar van de andere lui die voordeel hebben gehad uit haar cellen, iets zullen doen om haar te eren en het goed te maken met de familie.’

Het is een fascinerend verhaal met meerdere kanten. Het biografische verhaal van Henrietta en haar familie, de zoektocht van de auteur naar die familie en naar betrokkenen, de ethische kant over het gebruik van weefsels zonder toestemming en een geschiedenisverhaal over de ontwikkeling van de geneeskunst en de rol van de HeLa-cellen hierin.

De erkenning is er nu gelukkig wel. Er is een film op basis van dit boek gemaakt. De opbrengsten daarvan en van haar boek gebruikt de auteur voor een stichting die zorgt voor studiebeurzen en ziektekostenverzekeringen voor de nakomelingen van Henrietta Lacks. Publicaties waarin de HeLa-cellen een rol spelen worden mede beoordeeld door een afvaardiging van de familie én de familie dient te worden erkend in die publicatie. Tenslotte is deze zaak van invloed geweest op de uitvaardiging van de Common Rule. Dat is ethische regelgeving die een ‘verklaring van vrijwillige toestemming’ verplicht als dokters van plan zijn gegevens van een patiënt te gebruiken in hun onderzoek.

Vertaling; Ariëtte van Bennekum ( )
  Koen1 | Dec 29, 2023 |
Viser 1-5 af 735 (næste | vis alle)
Skloot narrates the science lucidly, tracks the racial politics of medicine thoughtfully and tells the Lacks family’s often painful history with grace. She also confronts the spookiness of the cells themselves, intrepidly crossing into the spiritual plane on which the family has come to understand their mother’s continued presence in the world. Science writing is often just about “the facts.” ­Skloot’s book, her first, is far deeper, braver and more wonderful.
 
I put down Rebecca Skloot’s first book, “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,” more than once. Ten times, probably. Once to poke the fire. Once to silence a pinging BlackBerry. And eight times to chase my wife and assorted visitors around the house, to tell them I was holding one of the most graceful and moving nonfiction books I’ve read in a very long time.
 
Writing with a novelist's artistry, a biologist's expertise, and the zeal of an investigative reporter, Skloot tells a truly astonishing story of racism and poverty, science and conscience, spirituality and family, all driven by a galvanizing inquiry into the sanctity of the body and the very nature of the life force.
tilføjet af sduff222 | RedigerBooklist, Donna Seaman (Dec 1, 2009)
 
Henrietta Lacks died of cervical cancer in a “colored” hospital ward in Baltimore in 1951. She would have gone forever unnoticed by the outside world if not for the dime-sized slice of her tumor sent to a lab for research eight months earlier. ...
Skloot, a science writer, has been fascinated with Lacks since she first took a biology class at age 16. As she went on to earn a degree in the subject, she yearned to know more about the woman, anonymous for years, who was responsible for those ubiquitous cells....
 
Skloot tells a rich, resonant tale of modern science, the wonders it can perform and how easily it can exploit society's most vulnerable people.
tilføjet af Shortride | RedigerPublishers Weekly
 

» Tilføj andre forfattere (9 mulige)

Forfatter navnRolleHvilken slags forfatterVærk?Status
Rebecca Sklootprimær forfatteralle udgaverberegnet
Campbell, CassandraFortællerhovedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Turpin, BahniFortællerhovedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Acedo, Sara R.Omslagsdesignermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Grip, GöranOversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Townsend, MandaFotografmedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet

Hæderspriser

Distinctions

Notable Lists

Du bliver nødt til at logge ind for at redigere data i Almen Viden.
For mere hjælp se Almen Viden hjælpesiden.
Kanonisk titel
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Originaltitel
Alternative titler
Oprindelig udgivelsesdato
Personer/Figurer
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Vigtige steder
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Vigtige begivenheder
Beslægtede film
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Indskrift
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
We must not see any person as an abstraction.
Instead, we must see in every person a universe with its own secrets,
with its own treasures, with its own sources of anguish,
and with some measure of triumph.

----Elie Wiesel
from The Nazi Doctors and the Nuremberg Code
Tilegnelse
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
For my family:

My parents, Betsy and Floyd; their spouses, Terry and Beverly;
my brother and sister-in-law, Matt and Renee;
and my wonderful nephews, Nick and Justin.
They all did without me for far too long because of this book,
but never stopped believing in it, or me.

And in loving memory of my grandfather,
James Robert Lee (1912-2003),
who treasured books more than anyone I've known.
Første ord
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
On January 29, 1951, David Lacks sat behind the wheel of his old Buick, watching the rain fall.
Citater
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
...But I always have thought it was strange, if our mother cells done so much for medicine, how come her family can't afford to see no doctors? Don't make no sense. People got rich off my mother without us even knowin about them takin her cells, now we don't get a dime. I used to get so mad about that to where it made me sick and I had to take pills. But I don't got it in me no more to fight. I just want to know who my mother was.
----Deborah Lacks
When I tell people the story of Henrietta Lacks and her cells, the first question is usually Wasn't it illegal for doctors to take Henrietta's cells without her knowledge? Don't doctors have to tell you when they use your cells in research? The answer is no--not in 1951, and not in 2009, when this book went to press.
Sidste ord
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
(Klik for at vise Advarsel: Kan indeholde afsløringer.)
(Klik for at vise Advarsel: Kan indeholde afsløringer.)
(Klik for at vise Advarsel: Kan indeholde afsløringer.)
Oplysning om flertydighed
Forlagets redaktører
Bagsidecitater
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Originalsprog
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC
Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer, yet her cells--taken without her knowledge--became one of the most important tools in medicine. The first "immortal" human cells grown in culture, they are still alive today, though she has been dead for more than sixty years. HeLa cells were vital for developing the polio vaccine; uncovered secrets of cancer and viruses; helped lead to in vitro fertilization, cloning, and gene mapping; and have been bought and sold by the billions. Yet Henrietta Lacks is buried in an unmarked grave. Her family did not learn of her "immortality" until more than twenty years after her death, when scientists began using her husband and children in research without informed consent. The story of the Lacks family is inextricably connected to the dark history of experimentation on African Americans, the birth of bioethics, and the legal battles over whether we control the stuff we are made of.

No library descriptions found.

Beskrivelse af bogen
Haiku-resume

Current Discussions

Ingen

Populære omslag

Quick Links

Vurdering

Gennemsnit: (4.16)
0.5 1
1 33
1.5 1
2 103
2.5 21
3 486
3.5 154
4 1524
4.5 263
5 1405

Er det dig?

Bliv LibraryThing-forfatter.

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Brugerbetingelser/Håndtering af brugeroplysninger | Hjælp/FAQs | Blog | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterladte biblioteker | Tidlige Anmeldere | Almen Viden | 201,796,727 bøger! | Topbjælke: Altid synlig