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The Shuttle af Frances Hodgson Burnett
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The Shuttle (original 1907; udgave 1907)

af Frances Hodgson Burnett

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
3861950,044 (4.01)77
Excerpt: ...have the power to spend thousands of guineas on tiger skins, Oriental rugs, and other beauties, barrenness is easily transformed. The drawing-room wore a changed aspect, and at a first glance it was to be seen that in poor little Lady Anstruthers, as she had generally been called, there was to be noted alteration also. In her case the change, being in its first stages, could not perhaps be yet called transformation, but, aided by softly pretty arrangement of dress and hair, a light in her eyes, and a suggestion of pink under her skin, one recalled that she had once been a pretty little woman, and that after all she was only about thirty-two years old. That her sister, Miss Vanderpoel, had beauty, it was not necessary to hesitate in deciding. Neither Lord Dunholm nor his wife nor their son did hesitate. A girl with long limbs an alluring profile, and extraordinary black lashes set round lovely Irish-blue eyes, possesses physical capital not to be argued about. She was not one of the curious, exotic little creatures, whose thin, though sometimes rather sweet, and always gay, high-pitched young voices Lord Dunholm had been so especially struck by in the early days of the American invasion. Her voice had a tone one would be likely to remember with pleasure. How well she moved… (mere)
Medlem:Kateingilo
Titel:The Shuttle
Forfattere:Frances Hodgson Burnett
Info:Frederick A. Stokes Company (1907), Hardcover, 512 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:fiction

Detaljer om værket

The Shuttle af Frances Hodgson Burnett (1907)

  1. 20
    The Buccaneers af Edith Wharton (Sakerfalcon)
    Sakerfalcon: Wharton's final (unfinished) novel tackles the same theme as The Shuttle - American heiresses marrying into the English aristocracy, with mixed results.
  2. 00
    Stormfulde højder af Emily Brontë (Anonym bruger)
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Viser 1-5 af 19 (næste | vis alle)
I had no idea, until I saw a review of this novel on someone's blog, that Burnett had even written novels for adults. I read her children's novels decades ago (when I was a child) and remember them as very Victorian and overly sentimental. "The Shuttle" on the other hand is not at all sentimental - and it was great.

The Vanderpoels, American millionaires, have two daughters and the eldest, Rosalie, marries Sir Nigel Anstruther and moves to England. They lose contact with her - it's not really a spoiler to say that Sir Nigel turns out to have only been after her money and is emotionally and physically abusive to her. Twelve years later, her much younger sister, Betty, who was always suspicious of Sir Nigel, sets out for England to get to the bottom of things. Betty is a fantastic character, who while pretty much perfect to start with, still manages to develop and grow as a character. Rosy is a bit pathetic and her poor son fades out of the story completely about half way through, but Sir Nigel is an excellent villain and Betty falls in love along the way.

If I had to criticize, I would say it is perhaps longer than it needed to be and there is more description of internal musing and less dialogue than is ideal. Still, the best book I have read for a while - I read the free Kindle edition, but have ordered a Persephone Books edition to keep. ( )
  pgchuis | Nov 28, 2017 |
The Shuttle is a tale of transatlantic marriage gone wrong and how the love of a sister manages to put things to right. In the early days of easy travel across the Atlantic, a British baronet manages to marry silly but extremely wealthy Rosy Vanderpoel. All he wants is her money, and he resents that it will be left in her hands instead of his upon their marriage. So the moment he gets her away from her family, he begins isolating and tormenting her. Her loving family across the ocean wonders how she is doing as letters begin tapering off and they hear no news of her. Twelve years later her younger sister, a much stronger character, heads to England to find her sister and get to the bottom of things. What she finds shocks her, and she immediately sets to work trying to ameliorate things for poor Rosy in such a way that her husband can do nothing. But what about Betty herself? Jane Austen may have said that a single woman in want of a fortune must be in want of a husband, but a single woman with a fortune must be wary. As her sister's case shows, you often never know whether its you or your money a man wants until it is too late. So she respects her sister's impoverished neighbor, the Earl of Mount Dunstan, because he too finds the marriage mart disgusting, even though it would benefit him to make use of it. He would much rather find a more honest way of going about it. But every plan that anyone has has to be put on the shelf when Rosy's husband unexpectedly shows up and is determined to keep the power in his own hands, as befits a man of his station. And power may not be enough, as he soon sets his sights on Betty . . .

A very interesting piece of Edwardian melodrama about the Transatlantic marriage mart in which impoverished European nobles would marry rich American heiress in a trade of money for titles. As the author shows, such unions were often unhappy. The book does a good job of showing the kinds of power that a many could have over his wife, and takes a remarkably strong stand against spousal abuse. I also really liked how it captured a sense of how a gentleman was supposed to act, particularly in relation to his dependents (i.e. tenants & employees). That's certainly something that has been lost in the interim, probably to our disadvantage. Highly recommended to anyone who has enjoyed Burnett's adult works, or who has an interest in Edwardian society or literature. ( )
  inge87 | May 9, 2017 |
When I saw this in an antique shop out in Washington State, I knew I had to own it. Burnett's children's books shaped my thinking as a child, and it is thrilling to discover her adult works. The Shuttle is a mature, slow, deep, read, full of gorgeous descriptions, tense moments, and thoughtful observations clearly taken first hand. More lyrical than her other works, it seems that Burnett used this work as a way to remark on the culture and society she knew well, herself someone who "shuttled" back and forth from the U.S. and England over thirty times - a rarity in those days. True to her style, the characters and story extol beauty, kindness, energy, and family. For fans of Burnett, for soft romances from the early 1900s, and for historical novels, this is an excellent choice. I highly recommend. ( )
  empress8411 | May 9, 2016 |
As the twentieth century begins, a sweet young pliable American heiress marries Sir Nigel Anstruthers, an impoverished English gentleman. To her ill-luck, he proves to be a manipulative bully, and he makes her life miserable. A dozen years later, the heiress's younger sister Betty, who has more wits and pluck than most, arrives to rescue her sister.

Betty is an intoxicating character: cool and self-possessed, smart, perceptive, unfailingly kind, and inquisitive. When she's first introduced she's a square-faced little brat glaring at her sister's fiance. Years of expensive boarding schools and business trips with her father help transform her into a heroine. When she first descends upon her sister's village, it seems there is nothing beyond her talents. She instantly charms the villagers with her good sense and kind gifts, charms the gentry with her manners and beauty, and cheers up her downtrodden sister&nephew. By chance, Betty meets Lord Mount Dunstan, who is as sensible and active as she is, but alas, has no money to keep up his ancient family estate. We're told they're clearly made for each other (although Mount Dunstan is a mere shadow puppet compared to Betty's intense and deep characterization, and his continual whinings about having no money irked me), and it seems that the only plot to the novel will be whether Mount Dunstan will get over his pride and ask Betty to marry him.

But then! Sir Nigel Anstruthers reappears upon the scene. And damn, he is a nasty piece of work. At first, it seems that Betty will easily beat him--but as time goes on, Nigel's sly comments and male gender serve him well, and Betty's reputation grows precarious. Nigel is actually dangerously good at gaslighting and turning people against each other, and began to grow quiet worried. Just when I got really scared, though, first Mount Dunstan saves Betty from physical danger and then Nigel fortuitously has a stroke just when he's about to ruin his wife's reputation. It felt like a cop-out--it was very unsatisfying. I wanted Nigel taken down using the law or for Betty to socially destroy him. Instead, he becomes paralyzed&non-communicative (a terrible fate, to be sure) and everyone pretends he didn't torment his family and waste all their money. Providing a united front to the lower classes was apparently more important than justice.

This is an interesting book, because you can see the gleamings of feminism and class consciousness peaking through here and there, but Burnett always pulls back. For instance, this book was written & set long before the Matrimonial Causes Act of 1923 made it possible for British women to divorce their husbands for anything less than proven adultery AND incest/bigamy/sodomy. Husbands could cheat on their spouses without fear of reprisal, and treat their wives as they pleased, generally--I remember a case where a judge ruled that a husband literally starving his wife wasn't abuse, because after all, if she wanted him to start feeding her she could just stop annoying him. In the event of a divorce (at this time, a very expensive and drawn out affair that required, iirc, 3 trials!), custody of children would always be awarded to their father. And of course, just trying to get a divorce was scandalous (see: [b:The Age of Innocence|53835|The Age of Innocence|Edith Wharton|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1328753115s/53835.jpg|1959512]). So in this story, Betty and Rosalie don't even talk about starting divorce proceedings against Nigel--it's not really an option for them. Betty's tactic is just to make Rosalie's home a comfortable one by lending her money, and hope that Nigel will stay away. It was really painful to read how few options or hope even a very resourceful, wealthy, popular, beautiful and fictional lady has in this era. But at no point does Burnett actually advocate for change, whether in society or in the law--her otherwise voluable characters remain silent in this regard. So too does Burnett pull back from examining whether it's fair that some people have millions while people literally freeze to death feet away from them. Her heroes spend a lot of time bemoaning the (virtuous) poor's poverty and providing charity, but the idea that perhaps fair wages should be mandated, or old age pensions provided to all, is never considered by anyone. The whole relationship between rich and poor in this book is like libertarianism mixed up with Victorian sentiment.

In the end, this was an odd mix of fantasy (from the very character of Betty, who is delightfully too good to be true, to the spiritualism that saves Mount Dunstan's life), gothic horror (Nigel and his treatment of his wife and son), and romance. ( )
  wealhtheowwylfing | Feb 29, 2016 |
There’s a lovely passage in Frances Hodgson-Burnett’s childhood memoir – ‘The One I Knew the Best of All’ – that recalls the joy of imagining what wondrous stories might be inside the books on the highest shelf that she couldn’t quite reach.

‘The Shuttle’ is exactly the right book for that child to have written when she became a grown up author. An author who understood the magic of the story; the very special kind of magic that captures children and makes them into life-long readers. This book has that magic in abundance, and I was utterly captivated, from the first page to the last.

‘The Shuttle’ is set early in the twentieth century, at a time when wealthy American heiresses married into the British nobility. They gained titles and social standing, and their husbands gained the funds that they desperately needed to maintain their family estates.

Rosalie Vanderpoel, the sweet and naïve elder daughter of a New York millionaire, married Sir Nigel Anstruther, and she had no idea that all he wanted was her fortune. She soon learned that the man she had married was cruel, selfish and dissolute, but, because he was her husband, because she was already sailing across that Atlantic, away from her family and everything that she had ever known, there was nothing she could do.

Her younger sister, Betty, was still a child when Rosy married, and she saw Sir Nigel with the clear-sightedness of a child. She was suspicious of her new brother-in-law, and when Rosy failed to keep in touch with her family Betty feared the worst, and she began to make a plan. When she grew up she would go to England and rescue her sister.

When Betty arrives in England, ten years later, she finds her sister a pale shadow of her former self, abandoned with her young son in a crumbling mansion at the centre of a neglected estate while her husband fritters her family money on a life of debauchery.

There is a great deal that needs to be done to put things right, and Betty is the woman to do it. She has the same clear-sightedness that she had as a child, she has the understanding of business of what makes people tick that she learned at her father’s kmee, and she appreciates both American initiative and British tradition.

You have to love and admire Betty; she has intelligence, she has enthusiasm, she has empathy, and she is ready to spend money and to do whatever has to be done. She begins in the garden, with the gardener, and as the garden responds to love and care, so does the estate and the village around it.

The transformation of Rosy and of the estate that her young son with inherit is always at the centre of the story and it’s wonderful, rich in description, rich in understanding of humanity, but there is far more going on here.

An American typewriter salesman on a bicycling tour of Britain has a small but significant part to play.

The neighbouring estate over belongs to another impoverished nobleman, who loves his house and the country around it, but who doesn’t know how to save it and is far to proud to ask for help.

And back in America a proud and anxious father waited for news of his daughters.

Oh, this is a wonderful story, a big, old-fashioned book that makes it so easy to just read and read and read.

I loved the wonderful cast of characters: Rosy was lovely, and I really did feel for her; Betty was wonderful, the very best kind of heroine; their father was exactly the right kind of father; Mount Dunstan, from the neighbouring estate appeared weak but proved to be the best kind of hero; and Sir Nigel was a villain worthy of booing and hissing …..

It’s not subtle, but it is so lovely. Think of it as a story for a grown-up reader still on touch with their inner reading child ….

I loved that it was rooted in real history, and that the story explored the strengths and weaknesses of the British and American ways, and how they can work together for the greater good of both.

I loved that the author drew so very well on her own experiences, of life on both sides of the Atlantic and of marital abuse, and on her love of family, home and garden.

I loved the house and the garden that were described so beautifully and so lovingly that they came to life. I could see them, I really could.

And there’s a robin – if you’ve read ‘The Secret Garden’ you’ll appreciate that.

I loved that this was the story of the most wonderful heroine – and that the damsel in distress was rescued not by a knight in shining armour, but by her little sister!

I was a little disappointed that the end of the story lurched into melodrama, but in the end it was right. It was the ending that I had expected from quite early in the story, but the route there proved to be nicely unpredictable, and I loved every step of the journey. ( )
  BeyondEdenRock | Nov 20, 2015 |
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Forfatter navnRolleHvilken slags forfatterVærk?Status
Frances Hodgson Burnettprimær forfatteralle udgaverberegnet
Sebba, AnneForordmedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Underwood, Clarence F.Illustratormedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet

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Excerpt: ...have the power to spend thousands of guineas on tiger skins, Oriental rugs, and other beauties, barrenness is easily transformed. The drawing-room wore a changed aspect, and at a first glance it was to be seen that in poor little Lady Anstruthers, as she had generally been called, there was to be noted alteration also. In her case the change, being in its first stages, could not perhaps be yet called transformation, but, aided by softly pretty arrangement of dress and hair, a light in her eyes, and a suggestion of pink under her skin, one recalled that she had once been a pretty little woman, and that after all she was only about thirty-two years old. That her sister, Miss Vanderpoel, had beauty, it was not necessary to hesitate in deciding. Neither Lord Dunholm nor his wife nor their son did hesitate. A girl with long limbs an alluring profile, and extraordinary black lashes set round lovely Irish-blue eyes, possesses physical capital not to be argued about. She was not one of the curious, exotic little creatures, whose thin, though sometimes rather sweet, and always gay, high-pitched young voices Lord Dunholm had been so especially struck by in the early days of the American invasion. Her voice had a tone one would be likely to remember with pleasure. How well she moved

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