HjemGrupperSnakMereZeitgeist
Søg På Websted
På dette site bruger vi cookies til at levere vores ydelser, forbedre performance, til analyseformål, og (hvis brugeren ikke er logget ind) til reklamer. Ved at bruge LibraryThing anerkender du at have læst og forstået vores vilkår og betingelser inklusive vores politik for håndtering af brugeroplysninger. Din brug af dette site og dets ydelser er underlagt disse vilkår og betingelser.
Hide this

Resultater fra Google Bøger

Klik på en miniature for at gå til Google Books

The Beguiled: A Novel (Movie Tie-In) af…
Indlæser...

The Beguiled: A Novel (Movie Tie-In) (original 1966; udgave 2017)

af Thomas Cullinan (Forfatter)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
224694,854 (3.42)6
"The basis for the major motion picture starring Nicole Kidman, Colin Farrell, Kirsten Dunst, and Elle Fanning, and directed by Sofia Coppola "[A] mad gothic tale. The reader is mesmerized with horror by what goes on in that forgotten school for young ladies." --Stephen King, in Danse Macabre Wounded and near death, a young Union Army corporal is found in the woods of Virginia during the height of the Civil War and brought to the nearby Miss Martha Farnsworth Seminary for Young Ladies. Almost immediately he sets about beguiling the three women and five teenage girls stranded in this outpost of Southern gentility, eliciting their love and fear, pity and infatuation, and pitting them against one another in a bid for his freedom. But as the women are revealed for what they really are, a sense of ominous foreboding closes in on the soldier, and the question becomes: Just who is the beguiled?"--… (mere)
Medlem:GamblinWad
Titel:The Beguiled: A Novel (Movie Tie-In)
Forfattere:Thomas Cullinan (Forfatter)
Info:Penguin Books (2017), Edition: Media Tie In, Reprint, 384 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

Detaljer om værket

The Beguiled af Thomas Cullinan (1966)

Indlæser...

Bliv medlem af LibraryThing for at finde ud af, om du vil kunne lide denne bog.

Der er ingen diskussionstråde på Snak om denne bog.

» Se også 6 omtaler

Viser 5 af 5
Underwhelming. Predictable. Two-dimensional. I might downgrade it to one star later. ( )
  NML_dc | Aug 17, 2019 |
"How deep do the layers of deception go, I wondered one day."

I wasn't aware of this novel,until I saw an advert for Sofia Coppola's recent film version,starring Colin Farrell. I didn't know there was a 1971 version either (and I wouldn't watch a Clint Eastwood film if my life depended on it). So, being a Colin fangirl, I thought "well, I'll read the book and then I'll watch the film and find all kinds of fault with it,because I am an unashamed purist.And the only thing I'll admire is Colin's brown eyes." The problem is that after reading the book, I have no special desire to watch the story being unfold as it proved to be a rather problematic, irritating read, in my opinion.It's unfortunate since the start was very promising.

Southern Gothic and Americana have a distinctive aura that I've always found fascinating. The claustrophobic feeling born of the Southern sun,the strict morality (in appearance only), the lush and mysterious residences, the haunting plantations, the bloody history of the region, the turmoil and conflict are characteristics of the genre and present in Τhe Beguiled. A young man, a wounded soldier of the Union army, is found near the premises of the school run by Martha.A school for young girls who have remained in the region despite the ongoing war.It goes without saying that the presence of the young man there brings all sorts of conflicts and repressed feelings to surface and a game of secrets,sexuality and authority begins.

The setting of the story helps in creating an atmosphere that can be experienced by the reader.The hot air and the stiffness of the characters made me feel the claustrophobia of the place.It was so exciting,let me tell you.The action takes place in a few of the closed rooms of the estate and is told through the eyes of Martha, her sister, her servant and the adolescent students.It is interesting that McBurney isn't given a POV.It adds to the mystery of his character and provides a better perspective to the influence he exerts on the women of the house.Much of the action takes place during the night and I could "see" the candle lit corridors and the women with their white nightgowns tiptoeing,moving like ghosts,trying to make sense of the changes inside and around them.

Cullinan's descriptions are excellent.They managed to keep my interest, even when the action of the book didn't.The language is raw and sensual where needed.The problems came from the dialogue and,majorly, from the characters.Each POV read the same,as if we had the same person speaking throughout the course of the action.In my opinion,Martha,Mettie,Edwina and the others wouldn't sound exactly the same.They wouldn't describe their feelings and thoughts in the same way.And this is what happens,with the slight exception of Mattie who uses a few colloquialisms here and there,just because.As it was, I felt the characters lacked originality, there was no personality in the vast majority of them.

This brings me to the issue of characterization.I've never had a problem with unlikable characters,I've said it before.I love them, I think they make every novel more interesting and challenging.BUT with the supposition that they are well-written.In this case, they aren't only unlikable, they're just plain stupid,devoid of any focal point.I'm aware of the hypocrisy of the past,naturally, and the young age of the girls, but this isn't an alibi for badly crafted heroines.I work with adolescents and I can verify to you that there is an incredible amount of "character" in them (in a positive or negative way,it doesn't matter),many times more than in any adult.This issue ended up making the narration too repetitive,especially during the 2nd half of the novel.There are endless lines of exhaustive, cringe-worthy dialogue on whether Johnny should leave or stay,chapter after chapter.In my opinion,the book would have been better if 70-80 pages had been cut and the dialogue dealt with.

Martha and Emily were the only interesting characters.Edwina had a few moments but she was too wishy-washy wishy for my liking.Harriett was useless,with the interest of a worn-out doormat,Amelia had some potential that was lost in the process,Alice was a Nickelodeon teenager in the worst sense of the word and McBurney was such an awful person,badly and unconvincingly written.Nevertheless,he deserved every bit of misery that came his way.The author presented every female character,apart from Martha and Emily,as sex-crazed harpies, as sexually starving fools who swoon over a handsome stranger who knows how to sweet-talk them into everything.This was irritating,at first.Then, it became troubling and bothersome.Naturally,the book is quite dated in this matter and probably influenced by misogynistic notions of the past decades.I don't know what Cullinan was trying to show.Perhaps that we lose our minds and good senses when we're sexually attracted to someone?Well,this may happen in real life but it doesn't help in creating interesting literature.I'm glad that this view is buried in literary history.I find it difficult to imagine that a contemporary writer would do that and call the attempt "serious" unless we're talking about a cheap romance.Reading McBurney's ridiculous attempts to beguile the women,feeding them his stories and watching them fall like flies to his call was beyond frustrating.

So, 3 stars for the haunting atmosphere and Martha's strength,although my heart wanted to hand 2.It was an interesting experience,I must admit.A Southern Gothic novel whose setting was excellent but the characters and the way the story became more than predictable broke the deal for me.Try it and see for yourselves.If nothing else, you'll come across some of the most stupid people in recent Literature.To quote Sherlock "It makes for too much stupid in the room...."

Many thanks to Penguin and NetGalley for the ARC in exchange for an honest review. ( )
  AmaliaGavea | Jul 15, 2018 |
"How deep do the layers of deception go, I wondered one day."

I wasn't aware of this novel,until I saw an advert for Sofia Coppola's recent film version,starring Colin Farrell. I didn't know there was a 1971 version either (and I wouldn't watch a Clint Eastwood film if my life depended on it). So, being a Colin fangirl, I thought "well, I'll read the book and then I'll watch the film and find all kinds of fault with it,because I am an unashamed purist.And the only thing I'll admire is Colin's brown eyes." The problem is that after reading the book, I have no special desire to watch the story being unfold as it proved to be a rather problematic, irritating read, in my opinion.It's unfortunate since the start was very promising.

Southern Gothic and Americana have a distinctive aura that I've always found fascinating. The claustrophobic feeling born of the Southern sun,the strict morality (in appearance only), the lush and mysterious residences, the haunting plantations, the bloody history of the region, the turmoil and conflict are characteristics of the genre and present in Τhe Beguiled. A young man, a wounded soldier of the Union army, is found near the premises of the school run by Martha.A school for young girls who have remained in the region despite the ongoing war.It goes without saying that the presence of the young man there brings all sorts of conflicts and repressed feelings to surface and a game of secrets,sexuality and authority begins.

The setting of the story helps in creating an atmosphere that can be experienced by the reader.The hot air and the stiffness of the characters made me feel the claustrophobia of the place.It was so exciting,let me tell you.The action takes place in a few of the closed rooms of the estate and is told through the eyes of Martha, her sister, her servant and the adolescent students.It is interesting that McBurney isn't given a POV.It adds to the mystery of his character and provides a better perspective to the influence he exerts on the women of the house.Much of the action takes place during the night and I could "see" the candle lit corridors and the women with their white nightgowns tiptoeing,moving like ghosts,trying to make sense of the changes inside and around them.

Cullinan's descriptions are excellent.They managed to keep my interest, even when the action of the book didn't.The language is raw and sensual where needed.The problems came from the dialogue and,majorly, from the characters.Each POV read the same,as if we had the same person speaking throughout the course of the action.In my opinion,Martha,Mettie,Edwina and the others wouldn't sound exactly the same.They wouldn't describe their feelings and thoughts in the same way.And this is what happens,with the slight exception of Mattie who uses a few colloquialisms here and there,just because.As it was, I felt the characters lacked originality, there was no personality in the vast majority of them.

This brings me to the issue of characterization.I've never had a problem with unlikable characters,I've said it before.I love them, I think they make every novel more interesting and challenging.BUT with the supposition that they are well-written.In this case, they aren't only unlikable, they're just plain stupid,devoid of any focal point.I'm aware of the hypocrisy of the past,naturally, and the young age of the girls, but this isn't an alibi for badly crafted heroines.I work with adolescents and I can verify to you that there is an incredible amount of "character" in them (in a positive or negative way,it doesn't matter),many times more than in any adult.This issue ended up making the narration too repetitive,especially during the 2nd half of the novel.There are endless lines of exhaustive, cringe-worthy dialogue on whether Johnny should leave or stay,chapter after chapter.In my opinion,the book would have been better if 70-80 pages had been cut and the dialogue dealt with.

Martha and Emily were the only interesting characters.Edwina had a few moments but she was too wishy-washy wishy for my liking.Harriett was useless,with the interest of a worn-out doormat,Amelia had some potential that was lost in the process,Alice was a Nickelodeon teenager in the worst sense of the word and McBurney was such an awful person,badly and unconvincingly written.Nevertheless,he deserved every bit of misery that came his way.The author presented every female character,apart from Martha and Emily,as sex-crazed harpies, as sexually starving fools who swoon over a handsome stranger who knows how to sweet-talk them into everything.This was irritating,at first.Then, it became troubling and bothersome.Naturally,the book is quite dated in this matter and probably influenced by misogynistic notions of the past decades.I don't know what Cullinan was trying to show.Perhaps that we lose our minds and good senses when we're sexually attracted to someone?Well,this may happen in real life but it doesn't help in creating interesting literature.I'm glad that this view is buried in literary history.I find it difficult to imagine that a contemporary writer would do that and call the attempt "serious" unless we're talking about a cheap romance.Reading McBurney's ridiculous attempts to beguile the women,feeding them his stories and watching them fall like flies to his call was beyond frustrating.

So, 3 stars for the haunting atmosphere and Martha's strength,although my heart wanted to hand 2.It was an interesting experience,I must admit.A Southern Gothic novel whose setting was excellent but the characters and the way the story became more than predictable broke the deal for me.Try it and see for yourselves.If nothing else, you'll come across some of the most stupid people in recent Literature.To quote Sherlock "It makes for too much stupid in the room...."

Many thanks to Penguin and NetGalley for the ARC in exchange for an honest review. ( )
  AmaliaGavea | Jul 15, 2018 |
The time period is the Civil War, in Virginia, in a girls' school run by 2 sisters. The other characters are the 5 remaining students, a slave, and a wayward and injured Yankee soldier. In places, the action moves very, very slowly, with long passages of the characters thinking or considering their lives. Each chapter is narrated by a different character, and we hear from all of them except for the soldier. Many things are hinted at, but a lot of these are never explained, leaving a lot to the reader's imagination. There are signs of some disturbing underlying currents that finally begin to happen about halfway through the book. I found the reactions and thought processes of the characters, especially the students, to be somewhat unbelievable. Without giving away the second half of the book, I cannot go into detail, but what the girls and women do often seems stilted and artificial. This book is definitely a gothic horror tale of a sort, something that will not be evident until the reader passes the halfway mark. Overall, I read eagerly to find out what would happen next, but many times, my expectations exceeded what I actually read. ( )
  hobbitprincess | Jul 16, 2017 |
I really liked the way that this is written! The story is told sequentially, but the narrative shifts from one character to another. Kind of fun! So the injured Union soldier that ends up at a southern school for girls has his story told by the three women and five girls he encounters. And it's a good story! Lots of secrets, lies, and betrayals, and I was never sure who was the "bad" guy, or gal, as that title seemed to keep shifting and being shared. I also liked that some secrets are never really revealed, leaving it up to the reader to imagine the truth! Good read for me! ( )
1 stem Stahl-Ricco | Jul 14, 2017 |
Viser 5 af 5
ingen anmeldelser | tilføj en anmeldelse
Du bliver nødt til at logge ind for at redigere data i Almen Viden.
For mere hjælp se Almen Viden hjælpesiden.
Kanonisk titel
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Originaltitel
Alternative titler
Oprindelig udgivelsesdato
Personer/Figurer
Vigtige steder
Vigtige begivenheder
Beslægtede film
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Priser og hædersbevisninger
Indskrift
Tilegnelse
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
For Helen
Første ord
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
I found him in the woods.
Citater
Sidste ord
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
(Klik for at vise Advarsel: Kan indeholde afsløringer.)
Oplysning om flertydighed
Forlagets redaktører
Bagsidecitater
Originalsprog
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

Henvisninger til dette værk andre steder.

Wikipedia på engelsk

Ingen

"The basis for the major motion picture starring Nicole Kidman, Colin Farrell, Kirsten Dunst, and Elle Fanning, and directed by Sofia Coppola "[A] mad gothic tale. The reader is mesmerized with horror by what goes on in that forgotten school for young ladies." --Stephen King, in Danse Macabre Wounded and near death, a young Union Army corporal is found in the woods of Virginia during the height of the Civil War and brought to the nearby Miss Martha Farnsworth Seminary for Young Ladies. Almost immediately he sets about beguiling the three women and five teenage girls stranded in this outpost of Southern gentility, eliciting their love and fear, pity and infatuation, and pitting them against one another in a bid for his freedom. But as the women are revealed for what they really are, a sense of ominous foreboding closes in on the soldier, and the question becomes: Just who is the beguiled?"--

No library descriptions found.

Beskrivelse af bogen
Haiku-resume

Populære omslag

Quick Links

Vurdering

Gennemsnit: (3.42)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 4
2.5
3 11
3.5 4
4 14
4.5 1
5 2

Er det dig?

Bliv LibraryThing-forfatter.

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Brugerbetingelser/Håndtering af brugeroplysninger | Hjælp/FAQs | Blog | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterladte biblioteker | Tidlige Anmeldere | Almen Viden | 163,338,520 bøger! | Topbjælke: Altid synlig