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Klingsor's Last Summer (1920)

af Hermann Hesse

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A Child's Heart concerns the transmutation of a boy's innocence into knowledge of good and evil, and the painful guilt that accompanies this process. Both Klein and Wagner, and Klingsor's Last Summer are set in a southern landscape that reflects Hesse's life that summer; both novellas have heroes who are more or less Hesse's age at the time; and in both the hero's death is preceded by a grand vision of unity in which the polarities of life are resolved.… (mere)
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  Murtra | Oct 5, 2020 |
I love Hesse, one of my favorite authors ever. Not only is the spirtualism/sensualism dichotomy (which forms the major theme of all of his works) one of the more interesting philosophical questions of mankind, but I can't think of any author who has continually revealed his own personal neuroses and self-doubts through their characters. This quality has always provoked a certain empathy, admiration, and even self-recognition when I read his books. As someone concerned with those important questions of life, I can identify with his characters, and, because his characters are so autobiographical, I feel like I can consequently identify with Hesse himself.

One of the more fascinating thought exercises related to Hesse is studying his works as attempts to reconcile these two aspects of life: the ethereal, divine and ecstatic with the corporeal, material and sensual. As brilliant as he was, he never figured out how to do it completely, which is what makes all of his novels ultimately unsatisfying. The interesting part, however, is that each successive novel comes closer to the answer, so that [b:Demian|24861|Demian|Hermann Hesse|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1327975164s/24861.jpg|5334697] feels by far the least developed, and while Hesse realizes "Nirvana" in [b:Siddhartha|52036|Siddhartha|Hermann Hesse|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1320519981s/52036.jpg|4840290], it never feels authentically earned. [b:Steppenwolf|16631|Steppenwolf|Hermann Hesse|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1347752205s/16631.jpg|57612] feels altogether more on the right track before devolving into a psychedelic madhouse (perhaps precisely because he didn't know where next to take it?), and then [b:Narcissus and Goldmund|5954|Narcissus and Goldmund|Hermann Hesse|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1165553931s/5954.jpg|955995] and [b:The Journey to the East|13519|The Journey to the East|Hermann Hesse|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1316728881s/13519.jpg|1528180] get even closer to the ultimate reconciliation while still falling short. [b:The Glass Bead Game|16634|The Glass Bead Game|Hermann Hesse|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1312020091s/16634.jpg|2959456] is by far the most developed of his novels and gets tantalizingly close to a "solution" for this problem, but it still leaves the reader vaguely grasping at the "how" of Hesse's prescription.

As obsessed as Hesse was with this issue, he was never able to solve it, and it leaves us with the suspicion that it is an insoluble problem, perhaps THE insoluble issue of humanity. His books are so enjoyable, though, precisely because nobody has ever taken up the question with such earnest seriousness. All of his books leave us unsatisfied, but upon further thought one concludes that they are unsatisfactory only because they so unerringly reflect the great human predicament: the paradox of the divine animal. **Full Disclosure: I can no longer remember concretely, but I suspect that I owe a lot of credit for this analysis to Colin Wilson, from his fantastic [b:The Outsider|67880|The Outsider|Colin Wilson|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1348172189s/67880.jpg|3310176].**

All of that said, it is clear from this collection of three short stories/novellas that Hesse wrote them before he seriously started thinking of solutions to his Great Problem. They are by far the most depressing of anything I've read by him, and the writing is for the most part less interesting as well. The main stylistic problem is that the vast majority of all of these stories takes place in the head of the narrator, so page after page we are just reading their inner monologue. It is a well-written and poetic monologue, but it feels very constrained and fairly boring. This stylistic problem is most glaring in the second story, "Klein and Wagner," a tale of a respectable bourgeois banker who suddenly decides to embezzle thousands of dollars, abandon his family and flee to Italy under a pseudonym. After the first few pages of this 80-page novella, there's really only one way it can end, and it does so, very depressingly.

The high points occur in the 1st story, "A Child's Heart," and the eponymous "Klingsor," where Hesse gives one of the most vivid (and I suspect authentic, given Hesse's own mental health struggles) portrayals of manic depression that I've ever read. In the 1st story, Hesse provides a thoughtful and in-depth psychoanalysis of a boy's ambivalent relationship with his father, although the fact that it is supposed to be coming from the mind of a child makes it somewhat stilted. An example: . . . I felt . . . how utterly two well-intentioned human beings can torment each other, and how in such a case all talk, all attempts at wisdom, all reason merely adds another dose of poison, creates new tortures, new wounds, new errors. How was that possible? But it was possible, it was happening. It was absurd, it was crazy, it was ridiculous and desperate -- but it was so. 35 In sum, there are many beautiful passages and I quite like Hesse's prose, but I can only recommend this book to avowed Hesse fans. For the uninitiated, Steppenwolf, Siddhartha, or Demian are better bets, and if you like any of those, then Narcissus. ( )
  blake.rosser | Jul 28, 2013 |
En El último verano de Klingsor Hesse nos describe los últimos meses de la vida del pintor Klingsor, meses llenos de deseos de vivir y de obsesión por el trabajo y en los que plantea el presentimiento de la muerte próxima.
Alma de niño es el magistral análisis del comportamiento y los estados de ánimo de un muchacho que comete un insignificante hurto en su propia casa y se angustia pensando en las consecuencias de lo que ha hecho.
Klein y Wagner es la historia de un empleado que se convierte en delincuente y rompe con su vida anterior completa e irrevocablemente.
  pepviv | Feb 14, 2012 |
Klingsor, pintor, passa el darrer estiu de la seva vida als alps italians. L'estada és una reflexió de la vida i de la societat. Llibre més filosòfic que narratiu, la seva lectura no és fàcil. Molt poètic. ( )
  Montserratmv | Oct 28, 2011 |
1242. Klingsor's Last Summer, by Hermann Hesse (13 Sept 1973) This is in three parts. A Child's Heart, written in 1919, is a tale of a boy who steals some figs from his father and the terrors he goes thru in regard to his guilt. Klein and Wagner, also written in 1919, studies an embezzler who escapes to Italy and what befalls him there. Klingsor's Last Summer (also of 1919) tells of a painter's last summer of life. I really did not get much from these tales, but the language at times is beautous, e.g.,: "It was that glorious hour, with the daylight still glowing everywhere but the moon already gleaming and the first bats dipping in the green, shimmering air. One edge of the woods stood dissolving in the last light, bright chestnut trunks against black shadows . . . Here and there an acacia twig had already yellowed. The western sky hung golden and green above the velvet blue mountains..." ( )
  Schmerguls | Mar 30, 2009 |
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A Child's Heart concerns the transmutation of a boy's innocence into knowledge of good and evil, and the painful guilt that accompanies this process. Both Klein and Wagner, and Klingsor's Last Summer are set in a southern landscape that reflects Hesse's life that summer; both novellas have heroes who are more or less Hesse's age at the time; and in both the hero's death is preceded by a grand vision of unity in which the polarities of life are resolved.

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