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The prophecies of Nostradamus af Erika…
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The prophecies of Nostradamus (original 1568; udgave 1989)

af Erika Cheetham

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In time for the end of the world- The first major literary presentation of Nostradamus's Prophecies, newly translated and edited by prize-winning scholars The mysterious quatrains of the sixteenth-century French astrologer Nostradamus have long proved captivating for their predictions. Nostradamus has been credited with anticipating the Great Fire of London, the rise of Adolf Hitler, and the September 11 terrorist attacks. Today, as the world grapples with financial meltdowns, global terrorism, and environmental disasters - as well as the Mayan prediction of the apocalypse on December 21, 2012 - his prophecies of doom have assumed heightened relevance. How has the Propheciesoutlasted most books from the Renaissance? This edition finds answers in the historical context from which it emerged - the founding moment of Western modernity, and era of great upheaval marked by the Protestant Reformation, the sack of Rome, Ottoman advances, the Copernican revolution, the discovery of the Americans, and the accelerated dissemination of ideas with the development of the printing press - and in the poetics of its quatrains, whose cadences and apocalyptic strains are considered in terms of Virgil, Dante, Blake, Rimbaud, Yeats, and Pound. A revelatory new translation with the original French on facing pages, this edition also features extensive introductory and supplementary material - including a fascinating catalog of the verses that have provoked the most speculation over the centuries, and the historical events they've been used to explain - all helping to illuminate the cultural, political, and historical forces that resonate throughout Nostradamus's epic and give it its visionary power. considers its legacy in terms of the poetics of the quatrains, published here in a brilliant new translation and with introductory material and notes mapping the cultural, political, and historical forces that resonate throughout Nostradamus's epic, giving it its visionary power.… (mere)
Medlem:HairyOnion
Titel:The prophecies of Nostradamus
Forfattere:Erika Cheetham
Info:London : Peerage Books, 1989.
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
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Nøgleord:Ingen

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Nostradamus' samlede profetier af Nostradamus (1568)

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Obviously there’s no conspiracy to keep skeptics from dissing Nostradamus and that’s good; however I’d like to address and potentially help you unlearn three misconceptions about the text. I’ll call this the problems of efficacy, purpose, and applicability.

The first, (efficacy, or power), I’ll deal with in two ways. The skeptic, who usually isn’t clear about how one would use the text before criticizing it, usually makes some sort of sarcastic comment about not knowing the winning lottery numbers. This is not good criticism as if we were criticizing a cognitive psychological technique; I don’t think we would immediately assume that it couldn’t lessen anxiety (or whatever) just because it didn’t work one time, win the lottery, or we didn’t know how it worked—at least I wouldn’t. (That would be all-or-nothing.) But the really convinced skeptic isnt’t really interesting to talk to.

It’s also always important to remember that power does have its limits. The weatherman can’t make the weather and divination can’t discover the winning lottery ticket and more importantly it shouldn’t. It’s important to remember when you learn how to do things that there are things that you shouldn’t do even if you can. Otherwise you’re no better than someone who thinks that they’re better than someone else because of their greater perceived beauty, wealth, knowledge or whatever. It’s important to remember that the tyrants of the world usually do have something going for them; if they were completely bad at everything they would be no way for them to win any battles. So much for efficacy or power.

Next, purpose. This is a trouble that seems to be especially associated with Nostradamus among divination techniques; everyone seems to think it’s about predicting 9/11 or something like that—but no one ever seems to say this about Tarot. Of course, Nostradamus may seem more external or worldly than Tarot, but I think in truth the purpose of the two techniques is the same and can be applied similarly. If Nostradamus could’ve been used to predict 911 so could’ve tarot. If you’re high up in national security and you do a reading that says that enemies are present or dangers are present, and that’s in the cards for you, then you pay more attention to warnings in your next meeting and if the cards don’t say that then you don’t take extraordinary precautions if someone tells you not to. Obviously there are costs to maintaining an unhealthy amount of readiness when there is no danger and obviously there is a danger to not being ready for an attack. But no book about Tarot will tell you about predicting 911 and the reason is obvious; 911 is over. The time for predicting it is past. And moreover not one in 1000 will be high up in the government enough, and in national security, to preside over a meeting like that where that kind of specific knowledge is necessary. It’s the same with the Bible. Great people, people high up in governments, have read the Bible but that does not mean it is for them only, still less that the Bible is for predicting 911 even though the Bible has been used as an Oracle since ancient times. And it’s the same with Nostradamus. It is for every walk of life for whoever wants it and not only for people who want to write books which sound very important.... Nostradamus is actually a lot like the Psalms, which use enemies as a frequent image but still both are and are not about enemies and external things.

The third point, applicability, is similar. It is again a mistake to think that the purpose of Nostradamus is to predict 911. If it were then that particular quatrain would be used up. Indeed, if every quatrain had exactly one use then Nostradamus would be a little use, especially if most of them were about the Middle East, and governments. I decided to buy the book because it was mentioned by Stuart Wilde, who opened the book at random, (although I would’ve used a random number generator), and read one of the quatrains and found an insight about his own life and purpose. That worked for him. But the quatrain is not used up. If someone else opens to it and discovers something for them, and that works for them, then they have also benefited from it; and from being used twice it is no closer to being used up. This is self evident to me although I wouldn’t know how else to explain it.

It is similar with any kind of stichomancy (book-oracle) or bibliomancy (Bible-oracle) and now I would like to take the opportunity to show how I do it. First I will use the Bible and then Nostradamus.

At this point in my life I have few formal demands made on my time and anyway ultimately it is always up to us whether we drive ourselves too hard or not hard enough. Someone with too many demands being made on them might not push themselves very hard and end up promising much and doing little; someone with few demands being made on them might become so obsessed with the idea that they’re not being productive that they drive themselves to drink. It’s the second misfortune that I was worried applied to me. I used the Bible oracle from façade.com and got a reading from Job 42; “So the Lord blessed the latter end of Job more than the beginning”. I found this encouraging and I found it to be useful and relevant to my work of writing this review; although I started off writing the review—dictating it into my phone actually—a little tired I got more energy as I went on and I found it useful to start right away because I had sort of a draft of the review in my mind, the three points, anyway, but by the time I went to write it was already hard to remember and I would’ve been worse if I had waited. I also felt that God was telling me there’s an award waiting—that my end will be bigger than my beginning. I often get oracles like that even though it’s not easy to believe. In a sense I believe.

And now for Nostradamus; I pulled century 10 quatrain 48. I’ll admit that this particular language is new to me at least a specific sense; I’ve not used it before. Although in a way it is rather biblical, just more medieval. Anyway in this case even without making a long drawn out thing about it without trying to draw in the illusion to Spain (just like I ignored the names of Job’s daughters in the other reading) I think that’s the one supports the other. ‘The great army will be routed by a band.’ It’s phrased in a negative way but for me it’s positive because I don’t have any large army or many people or a lot of money at this point in my life and what the text is saying is that like Job I don’t need it. My little band is enough.

So those are my ideas about what prophecy and prophetic texts are or are not, and how they can be agreeably or disagreeably used. Few notice this work and half of those who do will scoff, and I do not mind.

Incidentally I did actually read the whole thing before posting the review so that when I use in the future I will be more accustomed to the language. They say Malcolm X read the dictionary, so I read Nostradamus.

N.B. I consider this to be spiritual psychology, but the publisher of the edition I have considers themselves to be in the business of printing “Christian spiritual classics”. I kinda look at it as more being a non-specific work by a person of Jewish-Christian background, but that’s not a brand, right. (Marketing would reject my ideas, lol.)

Anyway, the text can also be read as literature, and speculated on in terms of macro meanings. (“From the enslaved populace, songs, chants and demands,/while Princes and Lords are held captive in prisons./These will in the future by headless idiots/be received as divine prayers.” Sounds like he’s talking about mass incarceration and rap to me. The slaves sing and politic, and Noble people are oppressed, and although it’s morons who hype up the trends, we’ll all accept it as true.... one day!) It’s also a great incentive to the study of astrology, I think, although that’s a language I don’t know.

(I also like this one: Through the branch of the valiant personage/Of lowest France: because of the unhappy father/Honors, riches, travail in his old age,/For having believed the advice of a simple man.

Sometimes we act like the answer to Trump/ignorant white men is to demand credentials for everything and to act like everyone has to be a doctor, or nothing worth, just a cynical head on a stick, or else an ignorant white man. But sometimes the father of lowest France can be a valiant personage, bringing in his old age honors and riches, the work of life, and simple wisdom....

But there’s always another side, right: If, France, you pass beyond the Ligurian Sea,/You will see yourself shut up in islands and seas:/Mahomet contrary, more so the Adriatic Sea:/You will gnaw the bones of horses and asses.

Which to me is: If, “Europe”, you pass beyond the limits set by nature, you will be forever changed, Non-Europe contrary, and even more the changed face of nature, and death will be the result.)

It reminds me a bit of the Psalms, super-spiritual, “enemies” which are the shadow, to me they both seem personal, basically if not entirely.

Reading it certainly gives you a sense of the grief flesh is heir to, as well as this sense of poetry straining against the vainness of words.... I liked reading it, although I probably should have been doing yoga or something, lol.

.... Then again, though this is a pathless forest, perhaps everything is in this forest, except a path.

To paraphrase Billy Collins, I try to come up with a good interpretation, and then another good interpretation, and then another good interpretation, but nobody’s a good interpretation machine. There’s a lot of staring involved.

(Billy Collins Masterclass commercial again) Poetry makes a lot of people tense; you speak English—this poem is in English, and yet.... you have no idea what it means.

Prophecy makes a lot of people tense. The prophet offers us the Knowledge of God; knowledge and God are what we say we want—yet we treat the prophet like a parasite or someone we need to push out of a window....

.... Finally one last word about words. Stuart Wilde opened up to a verse that talks about a man with a “wild name” and felt inspired; I went through the whole book and never found this verse, so I did an internet search and found that one translation of I. 76 says “wild name” but my translation says “barbaric name”, which struck me differently.

To be honest a lot of the things I thought about the verses I didn’t want to share—for example the one about witches, IV. 31—because I figured you guys would laugh at me and anyway I talk enough.
  goosecap | Dec 26, 2020 |
If you try hard enough, each of these prophecies" is mere hallucination. How people could be stupid enough to believe them is beyond me." ( )
  ShelleyAlberta | Jun 4, 2016 |
Nostradamus wrote such enigmatic quatrains that it's anyone's guess what he meant. Then throw in a translator and who knows what he said? If you like to discover meaning in what could be meaningless, read this book. ( )
  JVioland | Jul 14, 2014 |
I think the predictions are silly, and the interpretations far-fetched; but some of the quatrains are spooky. So as a horror afficionado I enjoyed it! ( )
  Nandakishore_Varma | Sep 28, 2013 |
Médecin et astrologue de Catherine de Médicis, Nostradamus mourut au jour et à l’heure qu’il avait indiqués, en 1566. Historien, homme de sciences, poète et prophète, il eut la vision de centaines d’évènements déterminants de l’Histoire. De la Révolution française à la Grande Guerre, de l’avènement de Napoléon à la prise du pouvoir par Hitler, de la destruction de Hiroshima à la guerre du Golfe, des guerres de religions aux récentes attaques terroristes : toutes ces visions sont décrites, en termes fort précis, au long des quatrains qui composent les dix Centuries. ( )
  vdb | Jun 7, 2011 |
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In time for the end of the world- The first major literary presentation of Nostradamus's Prophecies, newly translated and edited by prize-winning scholars The mysterious quatrains of the sixteenth-century French astrologer Nostradamus have long proved captivating for their predictions. Nostradamus has been credited with anticipating the Great Fire of London, the rise of Adolf Hitler, and the September 11 terrorist attacks. Today, as the world grapples with financial meltdowns, global terrorism, and environmental disasters - as well as the Mayan prediction of the apocalypse on December 21, 2012 - his prophecies of doom have assumed heightened relevance. How has the Propheciesoutlasted most books from the Renaissance? This edition finds answers in the historical context from which it emerged - the founding moment of Western modernity, and era of great upheaval marked by the Protestant Reformation, the sack of Rome, Ottoman advances, the Copernican revolution, the discovery of the Americans, and the accelerated dissemination of ideas with the development of the printing press - and in the poetics of its quatrains, whose cadences and apocalyptic strains are considered in terms of Virgil, Dante, Blake, Rimbaud, Yeats, and Pound. A revelatory new translation with the original French on facing pages, this edition also features extensive introductory and supplementary material - including a fascinating catalog of the verses that have provoked the most speculation over the centuries, and the historical events they've been used to explain - all helping to illuminate the cultural, political, and historical forces that resonate throughout Nostradamus's epic and give it its visionary power. considers its legacy in terms of the poetics of the quatrains, published here in a brilliant new translation and with introductory material and notes mapping the cultural, political, and historical forces that resonate throughout Nostradamus's epic, giving it its visionary power.

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