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Lustrum (Em Portugues do Brasil) af Robert…
Indlæser...

Lustrum (Em Portugues do Brasil) (original 2009; udgave 2010)

af Robert Harris

Serier: Cicero (2)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
1,543608,920 (3.92)72
On the eve of Marcus Cicero's inauguration as consul of Rome, the grisly death of a boy sends ripples of fear thourgh a city already wracked by civil unrest, crime, and debauchery of every kind. For Cicero, the ill forebodings of this hideous murder only increase his frustrations and the dangers he already faces as Rome's leader: elected by the people but despised by the heads of the two rival camps, the patricians and populists. There is, also a plot to assassinate him, and it will take all his embattled wit, strength, and force of will to stop it and keep Rome from becoming a dictatorship.… (mere)
Medlem:AlexanderDS
Titel:Lustrum (Em Portugues do Brasil)
Forfattere:Robert Harris
Info:Record (2010), Paperback
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:*****
Nøgleord:Ingen

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Lustrum af Robert Harris (2009)

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Engelsk (55)  Hollandsk (3)  Italiensk (1)  Fransk (1)  Alle sprog (60)
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1 ( )
  ejmw | Aug 4, 2021 |
A word of warning to start with, this book is known as Conspirata in some countries and this has caught some people out. Harris has intended for there to be a trilogy in this series of books. The first one is 'Imperium' and this (Lustrum/Conspirata) is the second. The third is on the way, I wish he would hurry up but I understand that Harris' research takes a long time and he has just finished 'The Fear Index'. I would recommend reading 'Imperium' first although it is not required, in fact there has been a considerable time between my reading 'Imperium' and 'Lustrum'.

So onto the book, it continues the tale of Cicero a Roman politician and his struggle for power in a very unstable time in Roman history. Cicero is an instantly likeable character in no small part to the fact that the story is told by his secretary and chief note-taker Tiro. The use of Tiro to tell the story is a very good move in my opinion because he is a humble narrator with little in the way of an agenda. One of the other instantly likeable aspects of the story is that unlike the first book, Cicero makes mistakes and is prone to mental meltdown and mood swings. He also gets carried away with his own power, in some respects turning into what he dislikes most about Roman society. To me this indicates the severity of the struggle he faces in comparison to the first book.

I am not expert on Roman history but by using real people like Caesar it helps cut down the time and pages spent going over a back story. Even with this fact a knowledge of Roman times and customs is not required as everything just seems to fit and makes sense. Due to the deviousness of his enemies there is always something going on in the background. As the story went on I found myself wondering who was responsible for what and what plans were being thought of next. I read through the 450 pages of this book in 2 days, something I very rarely manage to do and I simply couldn't really put it down. Plot twists come thick and fast and there is always something going on. This is one of the best books I have read in a long time. I can't wait for the last one to come along. ( )
  Brian. | Jun 13, 2021 |
Great book, puts you right in the forum! ( )
  expatscot | Oct 10, 2020 |
A stunning trilogy. Robert Harris has accomplished what many historical authors may aspire to but few attain. He has created an ancient Rome alive with the sights, the sounds, the smells of a city towards the latter years of the republic. He has painted a picture in my mind of warring commanders: Pompey, Caesar. Crassus. He has allowed me to view both the beauty of Rome from the aristocratic Palatine to the stench of the inner-city streets. He shows Romans as a people obsessed with wealth, and from wealth flows power, influence, and the ultimate prize a position in the senate leading to first consul adoration.

Pompey the great commander, the chief general in the state….” A large chair was carried in for the Imperator, and he settled himself into it. An ivory pointer was placed in his hand. A carpet was unrolled at his feet into which was woven a map of the east, and as the senators gazed down he began gesticulating at it to illustrate his achievements”…. Caesar, the chief priest, adored by all the masses, fresh from military success, biding his time as he waits, panther like, moulding the men of influence to attend to his every whim. These two together with the wealthy Crassus form the triumvirate, a power base for them to dictate and manipulate. It is however a dangerous thing to allow so much “imperium” into the hands of the few.

Cicero’s year as 1st consul is drawing to a close, and some of his finest accomplishments are now just a distant memory. When he faces a direct threat on his life it is to his wealthy companions that he turns for help and support, but such friendship will always require payback. Robert Harris shoes not only the strong side of Cicero but his weaknesses. His aspirations to climb the social ladder, result in a questionable decision when he borrows money to purchase a grand property owned by Crassus in the exclusive Palatine hill. As the candle slowly fades on a glittering senatorial career, and as the influence of a few wealthy men starts to emerge, the scene is set for a bloody conflict. Rome should have learnt the lessons of the past that it is a grave mistake to leave so much power in the hands of a powerful minority.
A wonderful story, the subtle blending of fact and fiction makes Lustrum an essential read…the final chapter “The Dictator” now awaits me” Highly recommended. ( )
  runner56 | Apr 14, 2020 |
I really wondered whether Robert Harris could continue the same level of drama and interest as in Imperium, the first of the trilogy. While the character of Cicero develops, his position changes radically from one end of the story to the other, there is still a sense of continuity, that this is still the same man, with the same world view, the same principles and the same strengths and weaknesses. Excellent book. ( )
  peterjt | Feb 20, 2020 |
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Harris provides through Lustrum great insight into this exciting period of Roman history not only by echoing historical sources but by numerous psychologic zooms: a glimpse or a blink of an eye here, a whisper or a rumor there, and over all the ancient truth of evil omen.
 
"Harris, whose previous novels include “Pompeii” and the World War II thriller “Enigma,” doesn’t take the path of many other writers of historical fiction and provide copious, painstaking descriptions of meals, wardrobes, palaces and the like to summon a long-ago, far-away past."
 
Over the two millennia since his death Cicero has been many things to many readers – authoritarian, pedant, vacillator, self-doubting philosophical sceptic. Each generation makes its own Rome and its own Romans, and Harris's version of this endlessly fascinating figure is richly and generously enjoyable. I look forward to the conclusion of the trilogy.

 
For all its political insights, though, it is as a pure thriller that Lustrum stands or falls. In that respect, it succeeds splendidly. It may not be the best novel written about ancient Rome – I still prefer Gore Vidal and Allan Massie – but it is a damn good one: wry, clever, thoughtful, with a terrific sense of timing and eye for character. And even though I knew how the story ended, I found myself turning the pages faster and faster, a tribute not only to the intrinsic fascination of these extraordinary events, but also to the narrative skills of a master craftsman.
 
Lustrum is a serious piece of storytelling, enormously enjoyable to read, with an insider’s political tone.
 

» Tilføj andre forfattere (16 mulige)

Forfatter navnRolleHvilken slags forfatterVærk?Status
Robert Harrisprimær forfatteralle udgaverberegnet
Barfod, ErikOversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Lie, FrankOversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Zwart, JannekeOversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet

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Cicero (2)
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We look on past ages with condescension, as a mere preparation for us... but what if we're only an after-glow of them" -J. G. Farrell, "The Siege of Krishnapur"
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Two days before the inauguration of Marcus Tullius Cicero as consul of Rome, the body of a child was pulled from the River Tiber, close to the boat sheds of the republican war fleet.
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Lustrum (UK) and Conspirata (US) are the same novel.
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On the eve of Marcus Cicero's inauguration as consul of Rome, the grisly death of a boy sends ripples of fear thourgh a city already wracked by civil unrest, crime, and debauchery of every kind. For Cicero, the ill forebodings of this hideous murder only increase his frustrations and the dangers he already faces as Rome's leader: elected by the people but despised by the heads of the two rival camps, the patricians and populists. There is, also a plot to assassinate him, and it will take all his embattled wit, strength, and force of will to stop it and keep Rome from becoming a dictatorship.

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