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A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Dubliners

af James Joyce

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
989515,271 (4.07)4
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Dubliners, by James Joyce, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics: New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars Biographies of the authors Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events Footnotes and endnotes Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work Comments by other famous authors Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations Bibliographies for further reading Indices & Glossaries, when appropriate All editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences-biographical, historical, and literary-to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works. Widely regarded as the greatest stylist of twentieth-century English literature, James Joyce deserves the term "revolutionary." His literary experiments in form and structure, language and content, signaled the modernist movement and continue to influence writers today. His two earliest, and perhaps most accessible, successes-A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Dubliners-are here brought together in one volume. Both works reflect Joyce's lifelong love-hate relationship with Dublin and the Irish culture that formed him. In the semi-autobiographical Portrait, young Stephen Dedalus yearns to be an artist, but first must struggle against the forces of church, school, and society, which fetter his imagination and stifle his soul. The book's inventive style is apparent from its opening pages, a record of an infant's impressions of the world around him-and one of the first examples of the "stream of consciousness" technique. Comprising fifteen stories, Dubliners presents a community of mesmerizing, humorous, and haunting characters-a group portrait. The interactions among them form one long meditation on the human condition, culminating with "The Dead," one of Joyce's most graceful compositions centering around a character's epiphany. A carefully woven tapestry of Dublin life at the turn of the last century, Dubliners realizes Joyce's ambition to give his countrymen "one good look at themselves." Kevin J. H. Dettmar is Professor of English and Cultural Studies at Southern Illinois University Carbondale. He is the author or editor of a half-dozen books on James Joyce, modernist literature, and rock music. He is currently finishing a term as President of the Modernist Studies Association.… (mere)
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Excellent look at life as a young Catholic (POA). Joyce's writing is poetic and thought-provoking. Young Stephan is Joyce of course, and I felt as though I were looking through his eyes while he was telling the story. ( )
  LindaLeeJacobs | Feb 15, 2020 |
I read this book as a teenager in the '90s, and all I remembered of it was some vague association between sex and religion, and that it had opened my mind to something vaguely "new" that I never could quite define.

Reading it again 20 years later made me see that the bulk of the novel's worth I had overlooked before, mostly because, being a teenager, we only tend to see what most resonates with ourselves at the moment: thus, sex and religion.

Now, teaching it, I recognize Joyce's immense skill in constructing interior worlds, and what's more, I see his legacy in many of the post-modernist works that I have read since then. His place in the literary canon is more than justified. I feel very small saying that. James Joyce dwarfs nearly everyone in the canon of 20th century literature. A 1997 listing by World Library named "Portrait" as the 3rd most important/influential book in modern literature, and that, too, is justified. "Portrait" critiques and dismantles both the Bildungs- and Kunstler-roman, and brings the novel from the 19th into the 20th century.

Of additional note is his incorporation of church, nation, and self, and how the three are intertwined in modern Irish history. There seems to be no extracting one from the other. There seems to be a misconception that reading "Portrait" requires an intensive course in Irish history to make it comprehensible. It does not. (Sidebar: the edition I read from B&N includes useful footnotes and endnotes to explain the historical and linguistic elements perhaps foreign to the lay reader. Highly recommended.)

Knowing Irish history, or church history, deepens the nuance of "Portrait" but an absence of that knowledge does not detract from the work's overall effect. Joyce's innovative narrative techniques make the read (and possible resulting confusion) worthwhile.

I would say that all contemporary writers should turn to Joyce once in a while. Joyce is pure energy, and has the potential to renew creative efforts. I put down "Portrait" last night, and then picked up my laptop and started to write for the first time in months -- the power of modernism! ( )
  voncookie | Jun 30, 2016 |
I read this book as a teenager in the '90s, and all I remembered of it was some vague association between sex and religion, and that it had opened my mind to something vaguely "new" that I never could quite define.

Reading it again 20 years later made me see that the bulk of the novel's worth I had overlooked before, mostly because, being a teenager, we only tend to see what most resonates with ourselves at the moment: thus, sex and religion.

Now, teaching it, I recognize Joyce's immense skill in constructing interior worlds, and what's more, I see his legacy in many of the post-modernist works that I have read since then. His place in the literary canon is more than justified. I feel very small saying that. James Joyce dwarfs nearly everyone in the canon of 20th century literature. A 1997 listing by World Library named "Portrait" as the 3rd most important/influential book in modern literature, and that, too, is justified. "Portrait" critiques and dismantles both the Bildungs- and Kunstler-roman, and brings the novel from the 19th into the 20th century.

Of additional note is his incorporation of church, nation, and self, and how the three are intertwined in modern Irish history. There seems to be no extracting one from the other. There seems to be a misconception that reading "Portrait" requires an intensive course in Irish history to make it comprehensible. It does not. (Sidebar: the edition I read from B&N includes useful footnotes and endnotes to explain the historical and linguistic elements perhaps foreign to the lay reader. Highly recommended.)

Knowing Irish history, or church history, deepens the nuance of "Portrait" but an absence of that knowledge does not detract from the work's overall effect. Joyce's innovative narrative techniques make the read (and possible resulting confusion) worthwhile.

I would say that all contemporary writers should turn to Joyce once in a while. Joyce is pure energy, and has the potential to renew creative efforts. I put down "Portrait" last night, and then picked up my laptop and started to write for the first time in months -- the power of modernism! ( )
  anna_hiller | Jun 22, 2016 |
Ambas obras extraordinarias, aunque "Gente de Dublin" sigue siendo mi obra favorita de Joyce y "Los Muertos" su mejor relato. ( )
  darioha | Jan 22, 2016 |
Group I1
  gilsbooks | May 20, 2011 |
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This work is an omnibus edition of both A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Dubliners. Do not combine it with either of its constituent works.
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A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Dubliners, by James Joyce, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics: New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars Biographies of the authors Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events Footnotes and endnotes Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work Comments by other famous authors Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations Bibliographies for further reading Indices & Glossaries, when appropriate All editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences-biographical, historical, and literary-to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works. Widely regarded as the greatest stylist of twentieth-century English literature, James Joyce deserves the term "revolutionary." His literary experiments in form and structure, language and content, signaled the modernist movement and continue to influence writers today. His two earliest, and perhaps most accessible, successes-A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Dubliners-are here brought together in one volume. Both works reflect Joyce's lifelong love-hate relationship with Dublin and the Irish culture that formed him. In the semi-autobiographical Portrait, young Stephen Dedalus yearns to be an artist, but first must struggle against the forces of church, school, and society, which fetter his imagination and stifle his soul. The book's inventive style is apparent from its opening pages, a record of an infant's impressions of the world around him-and one of the first examples of the "stream of consciousness" technique. Comprising fifteen stories, Dubliners presents a community of mesmerizing, humorous, and haunting characters-a group portrait. The interactions among them form one long meditation on the human condition, culminating with "The Dead," one of Joyce's most graceful compositions centering around a character's epiphany. A carefully woven tapestry of Dublin life at the turn of the last century, Dubliners realizes Joyce's ambition to give his countrymen "one good look at themselves." Kevin J. H. Dettmar is Professor of English and Cultural Studies at Southern Illinois University Carbondale. He is the author or editor of a half-dozen books on James Joyce, modernist literature, and rock music. He is currently finishing a term as President of the Modernist Studies Association.

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