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Barracoon: The Story of the Last "Black Cargo"

af Zora Neale Hurston, Cudjo Lewis (Interviewee)

Andre forfattere: Deborah G. Plant (Redaktør), Alice Walker (Forord)

Andre forfattere: Se andre forfattere sektionen.

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
1,6736510,567 (3.96)96
In 1927, Zora Neale Hurston went to Plateau, Alabama, just outside Mobile, to interview eighty-six-year-old Cudjo Lewis. Of the millions of men, women, and children transported from Africa to America as slaves, Cudjo was then the only person alive to tell the story of this integral part of the nation's history. Hurston was there to record Cudjo's firsthand account of the raid that led to his capture and bondage fifty years after the Atlantic slave trade was outlawed in the United States. In 1931, Hurston returned to Plateau, the African-centric community three miles from Mobile founded by Cudjo and other former slaves from his ship. Spending more than three months there, she talked in depth with Cudjo about the details of his life. During those weeks, the young writer and the elderly formerly enslaved man ate peaches and watermelon that grew in the backyard and talked about Cudjo's past--memories from his childhood in Africa, the horrors of being captured and held in a barracoon for selection by American slavers, the harrowing experience of the Middle Passage packed with more than 100 other souls aboard the Clotilda, and the years he spent in slavery until the end of the Civil War. Based on those interviews, featuring Cudjo's unique vernacular, and written from Hurston's perspective with the compassion and singular style that have made her one of the preeminent American authors of the twentieth-century, Barracoon masterfully illustrates the tragedy of slavery and of one life forever defined by it. Offering insight into the pernicious legacy that continues to haunt us all, black and white, this poignant and powerful work is an invaluable contribution to our shared history and culture.--Publisher's website.… (mere)
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Engelsk (63)  Fransk (1)  Hollandsk (1)  Alle sprog (65)
Viser 1-5 af 65 (næste | vis alle)
Back in 1927 and 1928, anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston interviewed a man called Cudjo Lewis in Africatown, Alabama. The elderly Lewis, whose birth name was Kossola, had been captured in 1860 in his native Africa, in what is now Benin, and transported aboard the very last slave ship to Louisiana. In 1927, he held the tragic distinction of being the last known survivor of those "cargo" who had been aboard. Hurston visited Lewis and, over the course of several months, recorded his fascinating but heartbreaking history, but she was unable to find a publisher willing to include either Lewis' speech as transcribed or descriptions of Africans' own involvement in the slave trade, and the book's release was aborted — until 2018.

It feels awkward to express affection for a book whose roots lie in dehumanizing hardship and misery, but I truly treasure this book and what it contributes to history. Lewis had an amazing memory, and the reader will be astounded at the level of detail he was able to recall, well into his late eighties, about his early life and his native culture. Hurston's patience and kindness shine during times when Lewis didn't feel like opening up because he had to mend a fence or work in the garden, as well as on the days when the heaviness of his losses overwhelm him to the extent that he was unable to speak at all. The scenes in which they just sit around eating peaches are so heartwarmingly wholesome. This is a quick, insightful read, and once you recognize the patterns, Lewis' speech is not difficult at all to understand, so it's unfortunate that was a reason given for it not having been published nearly 100 years ago. Highly recommended. ( )
  ryner | Feb 17, 2024 |
Zora Neale Hurston writes in dialect, so it is often hard to read. I listened to the audiobook, which was wonderful! Really interesting oral history. ( )
1 stem DanelleVt | Jan 1, 2024 |
This heartbreaking narrative is sad not only for touching on the inhuman atrocities of slavery in America; it's also tragic for telling what comes after emancipation, how even when Cudjo Lewis was a free man he and his family were attacked and unjustly discriminated against but a country that had decided he needn't live in chains but was still far from willing to treat him as a human being. ( )
  Autolycus21 | Oct 10, 2023 |
I had been meaning to read more by [[Zora Neale Hurston]] since reading her memoir, [Dust Tracks On a Road]. This one is based on her very early series of anthropological interviews with Oluale Kossola (also known as Cudjo Lewis) Cudjo was the last slave to remember being captured in Africa, taken aboard a slave ship and sold into slavery in the US.

The introduction of the book gave quite a bit of background on a scandal regarding this work. After she published her original article, she was criticized for having plagiarized a book published in 1914 written by Emma Langdon Roche. She later revised her work and added more details of their friendship.

Nevertheless, I found this very interesting. I just wanted More – more of Cudjo’s experiences as a free African, and as a slave. However, I fully understand that Hurston could only write what was given to her by an elderly man.

I listened to the audiobook, which gave a fine representation of the rhythm and cadence of Cudjoe’s vernacular, which according to the Wikipedia article, was one of the reasons this book wasn’t published in Hurston’s lifetime. ( )
  streamsong | Sep 15, 2023 |
I wish there had been more but the author didn't push the man who had lived to become free after being brought to the US as a slave. ( )
  BrendaRT20 | Sep 3, 2023 |
Viser 1-5 af 65 (næste | vis alle)
The book's uniqueness is in its recounting of a story in which we are all equally bound up by this cycle of oppression – the former slave plagued by the trauma of losing his homeland and family, the writer whose work survived the desire of intellectuals for white approval, the reader forced to challenge their own ideas about race and the internalisation of oppression. But more than anything it brings an African past up close to an African American present, at a time of great searching. "Throughout her life, Hurston fought against this idea that there was no connection to Africa once people arrived on these shores, and everything was forgotten," Wall says. "We know that's not true. But a book like this really brings that to life."
tilføjet af Cynfelyn | RedigerThe Guardian, Afua Hirsch (May 26, 2018)
 
Brimming with observational detail from a man whose life spanned continents and eras, the story is at times devastating, but Hurston's success in bringing it to light is a marvel.
tilføjet af Shortride | RedigerNPR, Jean Zimmerman (May 8, 2018)
 

» Tilføj andre forfattere (1 mulig)

Forfatter navnRolleHvilken slags forfatterVærk?Status
Hurston, Zora Nealeprimær forfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Lewis, CudjoIntervieweehovedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Plant, Deborah G.Redaktørmedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Walker, AliceForordmedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Möhring, Hans-UlrichOversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Miles, RobinFortællermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
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But the inescapable fact that stuck in my craw, was: my people had sold me and the white people had bought me.... It impressed upon me the universal nature of greed and glory.
—Zora Neale Hurston, Dust Tracks on a Road
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This is the life story of Cudjo Lewis, as told by himself. (Preface)
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In 1927, Zora Neale Hurston went to Plateau, Alabama, just outside Mobile, to interview eighty-six-year-old Cudjo Lewis. Of the millions of men, women, and children transported from Africa to America as slaves, Cudjo was then the only person alive to tell the story of this integral part of the nation's history. Hurston was there to record Cudjo's firsthand account of the raid that led to his capture and bondage fifty years after the Atlantic slave trade was outlawed in the United States. In 1931, Hurston returned to Plateau, the African-centric community three miles from Mobile founded by Cudjo and other former slaves from his ship. Spending more than three months there, she talked in depth with Cudjo about the details of his life. During those weeks, the young writer and the elderly formerly enslaved man ate peaches and watermelon that grew in the backyard and talked about Cudjo's past--memories from his childhood in Africa, the horrors of being captured and held in a barracoon for selection by American slavers, the harrowing experience of the Middle Passage packed with more than 100 other souls aboard the Clotilda, and the years he spent in slavery until the end of the Civil War. Based on those interviews, featuring Cudjo's unique vernacular, and written from Hurston's perspective with the compassion and singular style that have made her one of the preeminent American authors of the twentieth-century, Barracoon masterfully illustrates the tragedy of slavery and of one life forever defined by it. Offering insight into the pernicious legacy that continues to haunt us all, black and white, this poignant and powerful work is an invaluable contribution to our shared history and culture.--Publisher's website.

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