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Exile and Pride: Disability, Queerness, and…
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Exile and Pride: Disability, Queerness, and Liberation (original 1999; udgave 2015)

af Eli Clare (Forfatter), Dean Spade (Efterskrift), Aurora Levins Morales (Forord)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
332560,089 (4.3)2
Contents The Mountain 1. Place Clearcut: Explaining the Distance Losing Home Clearcut: Brutes and Bumper Stickers Clearcut: End of the Line Clearcut: Casino 2. Bodies Freaks and Queers Reading Across the Grain Stones in My Heart, Stones in My Pockets An Excerpt from Exile and Pride By Eli Clare Draft Version: Please do not quote THE MOUNTAIN I: A Metaphor The mountain as metaphor looms large in the lives of marginalized people, people whose bones get crushed in the grind of capitalism, patriarchy, white supremacy. How many of us have struggled up the mountain, measured ourselves against the mountain, failed on the mountain, lived in the shadow of the mountain, hit our heads on glass ceilings, tried to climb the class ladder, lost the fight against assimilation, struggled our way toward that phantom called normality? We hear from the summit that the world is the best from up there. Hear that we are lazy, stupid, weak, ugly, that we live at the bottom precisely because we are those things. We decide to climb that mountain, or make a pact that our children will climb it. The climbing turns out to be unimaginably difficult. We are afraid; every time we look ahead we can find nothing remotely familiar or comfortable. We lose the trail. Our wheelchairs get stuck. We speak the wrong languages with the wrong accents, wear the wrong clothes, carry our bodies the wrong ways, ask the wrong questions, love the wrong people. And it's goddamn lonely up there on the mountain. We decide to stop climbing and build a new house right where we are. Or we decide to climb back down to the people we love where the food, the clothes, the dirt, the sidewalk, the steaming asphalt under our feet, our crutches all feel right. Or we find the path again, decide to continue climbing only to have the very people who told us how wonderful life is at the summit booby trap the trail. They burn the bridge over the impassable canyon. They redraw our topo maps so that we end up walking in circles. They send their goons-those working-class and poor people they employ as their official brutes-to push us over the edge. Maybe we get to the summit but p… (mere)
Medlem:utdgwc
Titel:Exile and Pride: Disability, Queerness, and Liberation
Forfattere:Eli Clare (Forfatter)
Andre forfattere:Dean Spade (Efterskrift), Aurora Levins Morales (Forord)
Info:Duke University Press Books (2015), Edition: Reissue, 216 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Education, LGBT+

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Exile & Pride: Disability, Queerness and Liberation af Eli Clare (1999)

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Viser 5 af 5
Clearly a seminal work for a reason; Clare is so insightful, and so doggedly determined to hold onto and sit in places of tension in ways that are really productive and honestly also inviting. The first half, focusing on the sites of his childhood and the tensions between environmental protection and economic possibility for those living there, is insightful and has been foundational I'm sure for thinking about the binaries of queer life. The second half is similarly productive as Clare explores the lines and boundaries of his own life, and where pride and witness overlap and rub together. There's obviously a lot to chew on here, and the work is so insightful and thoughtful; every part has been clearly worked over with a lot of care.

I will say I think if you've read other stuff around crip culture and queerness, you may feel like there's not much new here; Clare's work has been so heavily cited (for good reason!) that ymmv on how familiar all of this feels/if it truly feels new. I think obviously you should still read it if you haven't, but it's something to keep in mind when you're approaching the text. ( )
  aijmiller | Oct 12, 2019 |
This was not exactly what I was expecting. I am not sure what I was -- the focus on environmentalism took me by surprise, that's one thing -- and that's not to say this is a bad book. It isn't; it's a thoughtful, incisive dissection of the intersection of class, disability, and sexuality, against a backdrop of the Pacific Northwest. But I was expecting something more powerful, I guess; this didn't leave me shaken and blinking as my world broke apart and reformed afresh. ( )
  cricketbats | Apr 18, 2013 |
Loved half the book. Hated half the book. Part II is excellent. Clare brings up the social stigmas and assumptions revolving around sexuality and disability, the portrayal of disabled people, and how sexism, racism, homophobia, and violence can shape a child's identity. ( )
  ametralladoras | Feb 24, 2010 |
This is a great memoir / set of essays. Clare provides a fascinating glimpse into the intersection of disability, class and gender throughout hir life and ties it in to issues as diverse as higher education, clear-cutting old growth forests and finding a community you can call home. ( )
  lemontwist | Jan 7, 2010 |
In Exile & Pride, Eli Clare explores the political and emotional terrain of disability, class, and sexual orientation by means of personal narratives deeply rooted in specific places and times. As someone who feels in her own joints the intersection of oppressions, Clare brings together issues that appear separate but are in fact part of a unified field of danger and pain: environmental destruction and the sexual exploitation of children, homophobic violence and the economic exploitation of workers, conscious racism and the unthinking exploitation of natural resources.

Some of us are more scarred than others by these things, but none of us are unscathed. As Clare points out, our bodies can be and are “stolen, fed lies and poison, torn away from us.... Stereotypes and lies lodge in our bodies as surely as bullets.” But Clare is not content to simply catalog the damage. She insists that “the stolen body can be reclaimed.”

This gravid hope within grave danger is Eli Clare’s gift to her readers. In return, readers are asked to join Clare in grappling with complex and difficult issues. Clare eases the way by writing in an engaging and readable style and by mixing anecdotes and recollections with more abstract political reflections.

One of the best aspects of this book is that Clare’s political reflections really are reflections, not just restatements of all that has been said and written before. That fact alone more than justifies the cost of the book. While there is some benefit to repeating and reframing basic insights, progressive activists will never move forward by endlessly repeating what we have already established. We need to figure out what we don’t already know; rethink stances that may turn out to be wrong; and generate new ideas about what to do next. In other words, we need to learn from leftist history, not just repeat it, hoping things will turn out better this time.

Exile & Pride makes a significant contribution in part because Clare is willing to think through, and then rethink, her own experiences as a disabled working class lesbian and as a feminist activist. Anyone who reads this book will probably end up thinking too. The process may not be plesant, but it will certainly be worthwhile.
  pattricejones | Dec 9, 2007 |
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Contents The Mountain 1. Place Clearcut: Explaining the Distance Losing Home Clearcut: Brutes and Bumper Stickers Clearcut: End of the Line Clearcut: Casino 2. Bodies Freaks and Queers Reading Across the Grain Stones in My Heart, Stones in My Pockets An Excerpt from Exile and Pride By Eli Clare Draft Version: Please do not quote THE MOUNTAIN I: A Metaphor The mountain as metaphor looms large in the lives of marginalized people, people whose bones get crushed in the grind of capitalism, patriarchy, white supremacy. How many of us have struggled up the mountain, measured ourselves against the mountain, failed on the mountain, lived in the shadow of the mountain, hit our heads on glass ceilings, tried to climb the class ladder, lost the fight against assimilation, struggled our way toward that phantom called normality? We hear from the summit that the world is the best from up there. Hear that we are lazy, stupid, weak, ugly, that we live at the bottom precisely because we are those things. We decide to climb that mountain, or make a pact that our children will climb it. The climbing turns out to be unimaginably difficult. We are afraid; every time we look ahead we can find nothing remotely familiar or comfortable. We lose the trail. Our wheelchairs get stuck. We speak the wrong languages with the wrong accents, wear the wrong clothes, carry our bodies the wrong ways, ask the wrong questions, love the wrong people. And it's goddamn lonely up there on the mountain. We decide to stop climbing and build a new house right where we are. Or we decide to climb back down to the people we love where the food, the clothes, the dirt, the sidewalk, the steaming asphalt under our feet, our crutches all feel right. Or we find the path again, decide to continue climbing only to have the very people who told us how wonderful life is at the summit booby trap the trail. They burn the bridge over the impassable canyon. They redraw our topo maps so that we end up walking in circles. They send their goons-those working-class and poor people they employ as their official brutes-to push us over the edge. Maybe we get to the summit but p

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