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The End of the Affair: A Novel af Graham…
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The End of the Affair: A Novel (original 1951; udgave 1951)

af Graham Greene

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
5,7781541,342 (3.96)440
Roman om en gift kvinde, der i et kærlighedsforhold til en desillusioneret forfatter finder den uselviske kærligheds sande værdi og indser, at forsagelse i tro på Gud må blive "enden på legen".
Medlem:pearly.queen
Titel:The End of the Affair: A Novel
Forfattere:Graham Greene
Info:Viking Press (1951), Edition: First Edition, Hardcover
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

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Enden på legen af Graham Greene (1951)

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» Se også 440 omtaler

Engelsk (148)  Hebræisk (1)  Hollandsk (1)  Svensk (1)  Spansk (1)  Portugisisk (Brasilien) (1)  Italiensk (1)  Alle sprog (154)
Viser 1-5 af 154 (næste | vis alle)
Intimate, insightful, but a view of faith I just don't hold, and definitely a book of its era in writing style and the way the characters behave. ( )
  wordloversf | Aug 14, 2021 |
Summary: A writer struggles to understand why the woman he has had an affair with broke it off, discovering who ultimately came between them.

Maurice Bendrix, a rising writer, encounters Henry Miles, the successful but dull civil servant Bendrix had cuckolded by having a five year affair with Sarah Miles, his attractive wife. The affair, hidden from Henry had ended nearly two years earlier. All that Henry knew (or claimed to know) was that Bendrix had been a great friend. Now he comes to Bendrix with a problem. He is concerned that Sarah may be seeing someone else and wonders about hiring a private detective.

Bendrix discourages this plan, but ends up hiring the detective himself. He’s never understood why Sarah broke off their affair, although at some level, he knows his jealousy of Henry, who she will not leave, had been driving them apart. But they had a powerful love that drew them together. They were parted toward the end of the war when a German V-1 struck the building they were in, leaving him apparently dead underneath some debris. But in fact, he survived. Their affair did not.

Only when the private detective purloins a journal does Bendrix discover the truth. Sarah had found him under the debris, apparently lifeless and made a plea, a promise to God for his life. If he lived, she would not see him again. And the others Sarah was seeing? An atheist and a priest helping her sort out the question of belief. In the end, Bendrix finds out it is not Henry or any of these rivals who came between him and Sarah. It was God. The God he hated who did not exist.

He discovers something else as he reads the journal, and talks with Henry, the atheist, the priest, and the detective. There had been a saintly goodness about Sarah that Bendrix hadn’t seen amid their torrid affair. Even that affair was a longing for passionate love, a love she hadn’t found with Henry. There was more–Henry’s life given back, a disfigurement that disappeared, a sickly child healed. I’m intrigued that Greene includes this “miraculous” element in the story.

We discover that neither Henry Miles nor Maurice Bendrix truly took the measure of Sarah during her life. There was a higher love in her life unsatisfied by being the trophy wife of a civil servant or the possessive passion of Bendrix’s love. The question we are left with is whether Bendrix will respond with love or with hate both to Sarah and Sarah’s God.

Greene, who wrote several novels touching on religious themes raises a searching question: can God call for ultimate love and loyalty? Even when it means the end of the affair? It may be one of the marks of modernity that this is even a question. ( )
  BobonBooks | Jul 22, 2021 |
It always give me pause when I can't find any merit in a classic (especially one beloved enough to have been made into a movie twice!), but Sarah Miles and Maurice Bendrix so grated on my nerves with their self-absorbed, hand-wringing reflections on their love affair and their peculiar and overwrought struggles regarding faith, that I will just have to agree to disagree with The End of the Affair's fans and move on. ( )
  CaitlinMcC | Jul 11, 2021 |
What started as a good story about an affair became annoying when it turned into a tiresome discussion about the existence of god. ( )
  VivienneR | May 27, 2021 |
I would love to say that I read [b:Brideshead Revisited|30933|Brideshead Revisited|Evelyn Waugh|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1438579340s/30933.jpg|2952196] and The End of the Affair consecutively because of my previous knowledge of how those books share common religious themes, both authors were friends later in life, both converted to Catholicism in their late 20’s, both used bibliographical aspects of their own lives in the creation of each book, both reflected in their writing the sense of moral apathy of post war England and – now that I have checked this all out on the internet – these books are endlessly compared and analysed against each other by academia. The truth is more mundane: I bought the audio version of these books because they were narrated respectively by Jeremy Irons and Colin Firth and I am getting to be very picky about narrators of audiobooks.

I listened first to Brideshead Revisited and I loved it. My review of it is here if it interests anyone. So I approached The End of the Affair with high expectations. I should say that I was never disappointed on the narration by Colin Firth, if anything he made Maurice Bendrix even more petty and obnoxious (and a liar, and mean, and childish) than I could had imagined him to be if I had read him on a paperbook.

As for the book, it had been a long time since I disliked a book so much. I disliked the characters for starters. But I have disliked characters before and yet enjoyed the book, so I have been doing some soul searching about my reaction to it.

I do think that Greene did not write with the same expertise as Evelyn Waugh. Waugh’s story was full of layers and nuances while, for me at least, Greene’s story felt two dimensional and quite early I knew he would push some religious parable down my throat.

However I think my reaction to this book runs deeper than that. I have lately been so tired of the portrait of God I see in the news and social media. I am tired of a God that dictates to civil servants not to issue marriage licenses to loving couples; the God that, in his name, has the temples of Palmyra destroyed, of course that God is doing much worse and having killing and raping in his name; a God that wants a war; even the God I see some people in Facebook claiming wants us to vote conservative in the next Canadian election.

I think I saw some resemblance of this in the God of Sarah. A bargaining God that bets people’s lives against love and pleasure. A God weighted down by sin and repentance, making small miracles and giving them to people like a carrot on a stick.

I am sorry, Graham Greene, if this is the God of your conversion, of this spiritual awakening that happened to change your like, he is yours to keep. Vade Retro ( )
  RosanaDR | Apr 15, 2021 |
Viser 1-5 af 154 (næste | vis alle)
In "The End of the Affair" the splendidly stupid private detective, Alfred Parkis, and his apprentice son, and the maudlin grifter who is the heroine's mother, equal the best of the seedy supernumeraries of his other novels. It is savage and sad, vulgar and ideal, coarse and refined, and a rather accurate image of an era of cunning and glory, of cowardice and heroism, of belief and unbelief.
tilføjet af John_Vaughan | RedigerNY Times, George mayberry (Jul 12, 2011)
 
Great romantic novels are about pain and hate, and among the greatest is Graham Greene's searing The End of the Affair. It is one of the most forensic and honest analyses of love you will ever read.
 

» Tilføj andre forfattere (16 mulige)

Forfatter navnRolleHvilken slags forfatterVærk?Status
Greene, Grahamprimær forfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Ali, MonicaIntroduktionmedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Firth, ColinFortællermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Hogarth, PaulOmslagsfotograf/tegner/...medforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Kitchen, MichaelReadermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
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Man has places in his heart which do not yet exist, and into them enters suffering in order that they may have existence.
Leon Bloy
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A story has no beginning or end: arbitrarily one chooses that moment of experience from which to look back or from which to look ahead.
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Henry had his tray, sitting up against two pillows in his green woollen dressing-gown, and in the room below, on the hardwood floor, with a single cushion for support, and the door ajar, we made love.
I suppose Germany by this time had invaded the Low Countries: the spring like a corpse was sweet with the smell of doom,...
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Roman om en gift kvinde, der i et kærlighedsforhold til en desillusioneret forfatter finder den uselviske kærligheds sande værdi og indser, at forsagelse i tro på Gud må blive "enden på legen".

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