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Traveling Light: Releasing the Burdens You Were Never Intended to Bear (2001)

af Max Lucado

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
1,77677,226 (4.09)4
Weary travelers. You've seen them -- everything they own crammed into their luggage. Staggering through terminals and hotel lobbies with overstuffed suitcases, trunks, duffels, and backpacks. Backs ache. Feet burn. Eyelids droop. We've all seen people like that. At times, we are people like that -- if not with our physical luggage, then at least with our spiritual load. We all lug loads we were never intended to carry. Fear. Worry. Discontent. No wonder we get so weary. We're worn out from carrying that excess baggage. Wouldn't it be nice to lose some of those bags? That's the invitation of Max Lucado. With the Twenty-third Psalm as our guide, let's release some of the burdens we were never intended to bear. Using these verses as a guide, Max Lucado walks us through a helpful inventory of our burdens. May God use this Psalm to remind you to release the burdens you were never meant to bear.… (mere)
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Max Lucado is popular, and sometimes the popular ones are the hegemony men, right. He’s offering comfort, which can be seen as compromise, or compromising. He probably wasn’t John Brown in his past life, although perhaps he could be persuaded to use the tree-planting search engine ecosia instead of Google, although maybe that’s a tech too far for the old statesman, or just not hegemony-y enough, popular enough.

But I had an awful day today thinking about the world’s pains, problems, and suspicions, and I’m starting to like Max and I might actually re-read this whole book, which I don’t always do in similar situations. I read this and a review didn’t come to me partway through, which happens. It is rather plain, and doesn’t make you convulse in fury and delight, I find. (Unless you’re suspicious, of course.)

Awhile ago I was reading a sociologist of Christianity, Rodney Stark, who had this Fox News sounding book title, The Triumph of Christianity, but I’m glad I read it for a lot of reasons; he’s a brilliant thinker, although his weakness is that he’s more pro-Christian than Christian, a little removed from life. But Stark’s maybe one criticism of our faith (if I may speak as someone who considers themselves a Christian, if a verifiably freaky one), is that it is very largely a religion of books and bookishness which many ordinary people do not understand because it is so difficult to get—the Trinitarian nature of God, a Personal yet non-polytheistic Nature of Reality—although to be fair many people don’t like to work, especially above the eyebrows. It is true that Christianity is complicated though. Catholicism is a baroque religion even today and historically a Latin language one, and Protestantism is very largely a religion of printing presses, down to the present, and making it be about any kind of book, even devotional and simple ones, “prices” it out of the range of a good many people.

But Max makes it more doable for many people, and even the most bookish and brave among us sometimes need to be told to let go of our baggage and that God can hold us by the hand and lead us through the desert.
  goosecap | Nov 19, 2020 |
LIBRONIX SOFTWARE
  abdiel91 | Jun 4, 2020 |
I've read several Max Lucado books, and have always learned from them. This one is not quite as great as some of his others, but you will be glad you read this. Lucado has a familiar and humorous writing style, using examples from his own life. This makes the book (and all his books) very readable and relate-able. In Traveling Light he uses the 23rd psalm "The Lord is my shepherd" to demonstrate how God wants us to release the burdens we were never meant to bear. ( )
  PhyllisReads | Apr 27, 2019 |
Some good wisdom from psalm 23, but not as inspiring as other max lucado books I've read ( )
  Amzzz | Sep 7, 2012 |
I haven't read many of Max Lucado's books. I like to think about the complexity and contrasts inherent in being a Christian. I like my theology complicated and messy. But there are times when what I really need is comfort, reassurance, and certainty. This is what I find in Lucado's work.

This book begins with the premise that many of us are not traveling light. We are bearing heavy burdens and often feel like we have to bear them alone. Lucado uses the 23rd Psalm to help us see that we are not intended to bear those burdens alone. The 23rd Psalm provides an alternative: "The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want."

Each chapter of the book focuses on one line of the 23rd Psalm, a Psalm that I cannot recite without hearing my grandmother's words in my head. The result is not any shocking insights, but rather a welcome reminder of ideas that echo throughout the Bible and throughout my Christian upbringing - words that I needed to hear right now. ( )
1 stem porch_reader | Oct 15, 2010 |
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Weary travelers. You've seen them -- everything they own crammed into their luggage. Staggering through terminals and hotel lobbies with overstuffed suitcases, trunks, duffels, and backpacks. Backs ache. Feet burn. Eyelids droop. We've all seen people like that. At times, we are people like that -- if not with our physical luggage, then at least with our spiritual load. We all lug loads we were never intended to carry. Fear. Worry. Discontent. No wonder we get so weary. We're worn out from carrying that excess baggage. Wouldn't it be nice to lose some of those bags? That's the invitation of Max Lucado. With the Twenty-third Psalm as our guide, let's release some of the burdens we were never intended to bear. Using these verses as a guide, Max Lucado walks us through a helpful inventory of our burdens. May God use this Psalm to remind you to release the burdens you were never meant to bear.

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