HjemGrupperSnakMereZeitgeist
Søg På Websted
På dette site bruger vi cookies til at levere vores ydelser, forbedre performance, til analyseformål, og (hvis brugeren ikke er logget ind) til reklamer. Ved at bruge LibraryThing anerkender du at have læst og forstået vores vilkår og betingelser inklusive vores politik for håndtering af brugeroplysninger. Din brug af dette site og dets ydelser er underlagt disse vilkår og betingelser.
Hide this

Resultater fra Google Bøger

Klik på en miniature for at gå til Google Books

Indlæser...

The Black Death: A Personal History

af John Hatcher

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
3761451,161 (3.48)3
In this fresh approach to the history of the Black Death, John Hatcher, a world-renowned scholar of the Middle Ages, recreates everyday life in a mid-fourteenth century rural English village. By focusing on the experiences of ordinary villagers as they lived--and died--during the Black Death (1345-50 AD), Hatcher vividly places the reader directly into those tumultuous years and describes in fascinating detail the day-to-day existence of people struggling with the tragic effects of the plague. Dramatic scenes portray how contemporaries must have experienced and thought about the momentous events--and how they tried to make sense of it all.… (mere)
Ingen
Indlæser...

Bliv medlem af LibraryThing for at finde ud af, om du vil kunne lide denne bog.

Der er ingen diskussionstråde på Snak om denne bog.

» Se også 3 omtaler

Viser 1-5 af 14 (næste | vis alle)
Interesting and insightful. ( )
  Mithril | Jan 8, 2021 |
Written by an academic historian, this book fails on so many levels.
Firstly, it is intended to be about the plagues of the black death in the 14th century, but the focus is primarily on the medieval church - the book is half over before the plague arrives.
The details of the plague are brief to a fault. There are three paragraphs giving some technical details of the plague - the other mentions seem to be limited to buboes and blood and dying.
I was prepared to forego the macabre details of the plague when the author starts dealing with the economic impact - particularly the new found power of the serfs to bargain for higher wages. Sadly, while the book gives some coverage, there is only a very limited attempt to put the changes in context.
Then there is the structure of the book - written as a sort of historic fiction. The idea is that the limited documentary evidence would be presented in the lives and words of the individuals of the village that is the focus of the book. Nice idea, but badly delivered. The reader is left struggling to comprehend what is pure fiction, what is probable fiction and what is fact.
And then there is the church. As Mentioned above, the focus is the church. The main character in the book is Master John, the saintly village priest. Bizarrely, this leading character is one that is NOT in the documentary evidence. So, we plough through endless pages of his thoughts and actions (did I mention that they were all saintly?) while there seems to be a total lack of documentary evidence for any of it. Sure, he is a composite of other figures in the country at the time, but why is this the focus of the book? Why so much detail about the church at all?
I'm not sure that it was the intention of the author, but the focus on the church and its response to the plague, generous though that focus is, makes the church and religious belief in general, a farce. ( )
  mbmackay | Aug 27, 2020 |
Good History, Weak Storytelling

John Hatcher's knowledge of the Black Death is unrivaled. He is an excellent academic and historian. In "The Black Death: A Personal History," Hatcher provides an account of the Black Death before, during, and after the plague strikes.

This book straddles the line between non-fiction and fiction. It focuses on a made-up priest, but otherwise most of the names, places, and incidents are found in the record books of Walsham, a real city in Suffolk. Because Hatcher relies so much on real incidents in order to push the narrative, there is little emphasis on the usual trappings of a novel: character development, dialogue, action, and so forth. As an instrument for history, the book is wonderful. As an instrument for fiction, it is very dry.

The exposition dominates the book. It concentrates on descriptions of the town and its' inhabitants, along with various rituals and customs. The descriptions of feudal relationships in the town are very interesting. While giving these descriptions in the first half of the book, Hatcher also projects the fears and rumors going through Walsham when word of a plague in distant lands arrives by traders.

When the plague comes to the Walsham, the residents mostly shut themselves in, venturing out only to seek help from the priest and his assistants when their loved-ones become ill. During the month or so in which the plague ravishes the village, very little happens in terms of a story, though various characters are brought in and out of the narrative to show the impact of the plague.

The final chapters, while skimpy, were the most interesting. These chapters showed how Walsham and the land-owners tried to recover from a shortage of labor, products, and markets.

The book held my interest despite of the somewhat tedious and repetitive descriptions in the exposition. Again, as a tool to tell about society, I think "The Black Death" is excellent. However, as a novel, it is rather monotonous. ( )
  mvblair | Aug 9, 2020 |
An historical "docudrama" about the bubonic plague's effect on Walsham, England in 1349
  JohnLavik | Mar 29, 2020 |
A fascinating account of the great plague from the perspective of a typical 14th century English manor village. The author combines historical fact with educated speculation to create an account that is not quite straight history but far more than mere historical fiction. Due to the paucity of information regarding everyday life from the perspective of peasants and local clergy, such a work provides a unique perspective far more interesting than most works about the Black Death.

Interesting, easy reading and well written. Highly recommended. ( )
  la2bkk | Nov 9, 2016 |
Viser 1-5 af 14 (næste | vis alle)
ingen anmeldelser | tilføj en anmeldelse
Du bliver nødt til at logge ind for at redigere data i Almen Viden.
For mere hjælp se Almen Viden hjælpesiden.
Kanonisk titel
Originaltitel
Alternative titler
Oprindelig udgivelsesdato
Personer/Figurer
Vigtige steder
Vigtige begivenheder
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Beslægtede film
Priser og hædersbevisninger
Indskrift
Tilegnelse
Første ord
Citater
Sidste ord
Oplysning om flertydighed
Forlagets redaktører
Bagsidecitater
Originalsprog
Canonical DDC/MDS

Henvisninger til dette værk andre steder.

Wikipedia på engelsk (2)

In this fresh approach to the history of the Black Death, John Hatcher, a world-renowned scholar of the Middle Ages, recreates everyday life in a mid-fourteenth century rural English village. By focusing on the experiences of ordinary villagers as they lived--and died--during the Black Death (1345-50 AD), Hatcher vividly places the reader directly into those tumultuous years and describes in fascinating detail the day-to-day existence of people struggling with the tragic effects of the plague. Dramatic scenes portray how contemporaries must have experienced and thought about the momentous events--and how they tried to make sense of it all.

No library descriptions found.

Beskrivelse af bogen
Haiku-resume

Quick Links

Populære omslag

Vurdering

Gennemsnit: (3.48)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 7
2.5 1
3 11
3.5 3
4 16
4.5 1
5 8

Er det dig?

Bliv LibraryThing-forfatter.

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Brugerbetingelser/Håndtering af brugeroplysninger | Hjælp/FAQs | Blog | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterladte biblioteker | Tidlige Anmeldere | Almen Viden | 157,918,914 bøger! | Topbjælke: Altid synlig