HjemGrupperSnakMereZeitgeist
Søg På Websted
På dette site bruger vi cookies til at levere vores ydelser, forbedre performance, til analyseformål, og (hvis brugeren ikke er logget ind) til reklamer. Ved at bruge LibraryThing anerkender du at have læst og forstået vores vilkår og betingelser inklusive vores politik for håndtering af brugeroplysninger. Din brug af dette site og dets ydelser er underlagt disse vilkår og betingelser.
Hide this

Resultater fra Google Bøger

Klik på en miniature for at gå til Google Books

Indlæser...

The Fall of the Roman Empire: A New History of Rome and the Barbarians (2005)

af Peter Heather

Andre forfattere: Se andre forfattere sektionen.

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
1,0812313,763 (4.04)27
The death of the Roman Empire is one of the perennial mysteries of world history. Now, in this groundbreaking book, Peter Heather proposes a stunning new solution: Centuries of imperialism turned the neighbors Rome called barbarians into an enemy capable of dismantling an Empire that had dominated their lives for so long. A leading authority on the late Roman Empire and on the barbarians, Heather relates the extraordinary story of how Europe's barbarians, transformed by centuries of contact with Rome on every possible level, eventually pulled the empire apart. He shows first how the Huns overturned the existing strategic balance of power on Rome's European frontiers, to force the Goths and others to seek refuge inside the Empire. This prompted two generations of struggle, during which new barbarian coalitions, formed in response to Roman hostility, brought the Roman west to its knees. The Goths first destroyed a Roman army at the battle of Hadrianople in 378, and went on to sack Rome in 410. The Vandals spread devastation in Gaul and Spain, before conquering North Africa, the breadbasket of the Western Empire, in 439. We then meet Attila the Hun, whose reign of terror swept from Constantinople to Paris, but whose death in 453 ironically precipitated a final desperate phase of Roman collapse, culminating in the Vandals' defeat of the massive Byzantine Armada: the west's last chance for survival. Peter Heather convincingly argues that the Roman Empire was not on the brink of social or moral collapse. What brought it to an end were the barbarians.… (mere)
  1. 10
    Rubicon: The Last Years of the Roman Republic af Tom Holland (kkunker)
  2. 10
    How Rome Fell: Death of a Superpower af Adrian Goldsworthy (HarmlessTed)
    HarmlessTed: Where Heather emphasizes the pressure barbarians exercised on the borders of the Roman empire, Goldsworthy`s focus is on internal Roman conflicts, as long-time consequences of the regime-change from republic to principate.
Indlæser...

Bliv medlem af LibraryThing for at finde ud af, om du vil kunne lide denne bog.

Der er ingen diskussionstråde på Snak om denne bog.

» Se også 27 omtaler

Engelsk (21)  Italiensk (1)  Hollandsk (1)  Alle sprog (23)
Viser 1-5 af 23 (næste | vis alle)
My rating is unfair: this is a very good book, that will appeal to all kinds of readers. Heather's sentences are very readable, he tells a good story, he takes into account pretty much every factor you possibly could to explain the "fall" of the Empire (including the possibility that it wasn't a fall etc...), and he addresses major scholarly debates. His case is well laid out and convincing: the fall of Rome in the west can only be understood in the context of profound changes in other parts of Eurasia, which forced populations to move, alliances to change, and so on.

But honestly, this is far too long. It turns out that taking account of pretty much every factor, and telling a good story about each of them in clear sentences can make a really dull book. Sometimes you don't need a story, you know? Sometimes you don't need to repeat every single fact about the Huns to make the argument that the Huns are important for understanding the fall of Rome.

So I got bored. But if you care about the subject matter, and have a higher tolerance for blow by blow military history than I do (you know what matters about a battle? Who won, and maybe why. Otherwise, please don't tell me about it. It's like describing a football game between two teams the reader doesn't care about), you'll love it. And if you have my very low tolerance, you should still read it, because there are great tales and great arguments. And every dull battle report is followed by something interesting. ( )
  stillatim | Oct 23, 2020 |
Interesting and well written history of the Roman Empire and it's interactions with the barbarians. Includes dramatis personae, timelines and a glossary, which are extremely helpful. ( )
  ElentarriLT | Mar 24, 2020 |
One of the best history books I have ever read, combining narrative flair with analytical depth. ( )
  pingdjip | Aug 20, 2018 |
while Adrian Goldsworthy's book on the same theme deals Rome's long standing administrational and strategic Issues, Heather's book is far more tactical. The cause of the disappearance by 476 is far more due to mishandling of the empire's relationship with the Hunnic "Empire" stapled together by Attila. There was simply too much stress from the usual level of usurpers, the failing tax base, and the loss of Africa to the Vandals, and a loss of Gaulish revenue, for a central administration to deal with. It is fun to read both of these authorities, consider Walbank's "the Awful Revolution" and of course the prose of Gibbon, and come to one's own conclusion. This is a good book on the tactics. ( )
  DinadansFriend | Dec 2, 2017 |
The fall of the (western) Roman Empire has inspired a great deal of industriousness on the part of historians, with Gibbon's monumental The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire standing as the origin of modern historiography on the subject. Heather's motivation for penning another weighty tome (albeit much smaller than Gibbon's) on the topic is to argue, contra Gibbon and many others, that the principal cause was exogenous and not endogenous. The fifth-century western empire was, he argues, to me pretty convincingly, not appreciably more "decadent" than either its fourth-century self or its eastern contemporary. What was different was the barbarians beyond the Rhine-Danube frontier.

The Germanics, Dacians, and others of the early imperial period could occasionally inflict serious defeats on Roman armies, most famously in the Teutoburger Forest in AD 9, but lacked the economic, demographic, and organizational wherewithal to stand up the the Romans in the long run. The border between empire and barbaricum was eventually drawn not according to the barbarians' ability to resist but according to what the Romans thought profitable to conquer. Compared even to Gaul, Germania had little wealth to tax. But across the following centuries the the world beyond the frontier underwent a profound economic and demographic development which left the barbarian groups of the later fourth century much closer to parity with Roman military power than their ancestors had been a few centuries earlier - they could muster many more warriors, with better equipment, and this larger number of warriors was divided among a smaller number of therefore individually much stronger political units. Much of the impetus for this development, Heather says, ironically enough came from interaction, both military and commercial, with the Romans, who in a sense created their own Nemesis.

Then, from the 370s on, the arrival and rising power of the Huns gave these newly more powerful barbarian groups - mostly Germanic or at least Germanic-lead, but also including multiple groups of Iranian-speaking Alans - a very strong incentive to migrate west and south into Roman territory. The Roman armies failed to ever thoroughly subdue the original Gothic incursors of the 370s - who inflicted a famous defeat of the Romans at Adrianople in 378 - because repeated new incursions were set off by continued Hunnic activity, both by the rise and the fall of Attila's empire, whose fall sent new waves of warlike refugees across the Danube. By the 470s, the western empire had ceased to exist - the decisive point being the loss of the North African provinces to the Vandals and the failure of the efforts to regain them, because their rich tax revenues combined with their previously unthreatened position meant they were critical contributors to imperial finances - while the eastern empire survived because its principal tax bases in Anatolia, Syria, and Egypt lay beyond the invaders' reach.

Heather writes well and his arguments are mostly convincing - to me at any rate - but a good deal of the argument here was repeated in his later book Empires and Barbarians, which I read a few years ago, which means I enjoyed the book perhaps less than I ought. But it's warmly recommended to anyone coming more innocent to the subject, or who has read accounts stressing internal causes and wants a contrary argument to compare.
2 stem AndreasJ | Sep 12, 2016 |
Viser 1-5 af 23 (næste | vis alle)
ingen anmeldelser | tilføj en anmeldelse

» Tilføj andre forfattere (11 mulige)

Forfatter navnRolleHvilken slags forfatterVærk?Status
Heather, Peterprimær forfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Cherchi, StefaniaOversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet

Belongs to Publisher Series

Du bliver nødt til at logge ind for at redigere data i Almen Viden.
For mere hjælp se Almen Viden hjælpesiden.
Kanonisk titel
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Originaltitel
Alternative titler
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Oprindelig udgivelsesdato
Personer/Figurer
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Vigtige steder
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Vigtige begivenheder
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Beslægtede film
Priser og hædersbevisninger
Indskrift
Tilegnelse
Første ord
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
The Roman Empire was the largest state western Eurasia has ever known.
Citater
Sidste ord
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
(Klik for at vise Advarsel: Kan indeholde afsløringer.)
Oplysning om flertydighed
Forlagets redaktører
Bagsidecitater
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Originalsprog
Information fra den spanske Almen Viden. Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Canonical DDC/MDS
The death of the Roman Empire is one of the perennial mysteries of world history. Now, in this groundbreaking book, Peter Heather proposes a stunning new solution: Centuries of imperialism turned the neighbors Rome called barbarians into an enemy capable of dismantling an Empire that had dominated their lives for so long. A leading authority on the late Roman Empire and on the barbarians, Heather relates the extraordinary story of how Europe's barbarians, transformed by centuries of contact with Rome on every possible level, eventually pulled the empire apart. He shows first how the Huns overturned the existing strategic balance of power on Rome's European frontiers, to force the Goths and others to seek refuge inside the Empire. This prompted two generations of struggle, during which new barbarian coalitions, formed in response to Roman hostility, brought the Roman west to its knees. The Goths first destroyed a Roman army at the battle of Hadrianople in 378, and went on to sack Rome in 410. The Vandals spread devastation in Gaul and Spain, before conquering North Africa, the breadbasket of the Western Empire, in 439. We then meet Attila the Hun, whose reign of terror swept from Constantinople to Paris, but whose death in 453 ironically precipitated a final desperate phase of Roman collapse, culminating in the Vandals' defeat of the massive Byzantine Armada: the west's last chance for survival. Peter Heather convincingly argues that the Roman Empire was not on the brink of social or moral collapse. What brought it to an end were the barbarians.

No library descriptions found.

Beskrivelse af bogen
Haiku-resume

Quick Links

Populære omslag

Vurdering

Gennemsnit: (4.04)
0.5
1
1.5 1
2 3
2.5
3 21
3.5 13
4 74
4.5 12
5 36

Er det dig?

Bliv LibraryThing-forfatter.

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Brugerbetingelser/Håndtering af brugeroplysninger | Hjælp/FAQs | Blog | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterladte biblioteker | Tidlige Anmeldere | Almen Viden | 157,836,172 bøger! | Topbjælke: Altid synlig