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The guns of the South : a novel of the Civil…
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The guns of the South : a novel of the Civil War (udgave 1992)

af Harry Turtledove

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
1,504358,859 (3.89)48
"It is absolutely unique--without question the most fascinating Civil War novel I have ever read." Professor James M. McPherson Pultizer Prize-winning BATTLE CRY OF FREEDOM January 1864--General Robert E. Lee faces defeat. The Army of Northern Virginia is ragged and ill-equpped. Gettysburg has broken the back of the Confederacy and decimated its manpower. Then, Andries Rhoodie, a strange man with an unplaceable accent, approaches Lee with an extraordinary offer. Rhoodie demonstrates an amazing rifle: Its rate of fire is incredible, its lethal efficiency breathtaking--and Rhoodie guarantees unlimited quantitites to the Confederates. The name of the weapon is the AK-47.... Selected by the Science Fiction Book Club A Main Selection of the Military Book Club… (mere)
Medlem:RGarza3rd
Titel:The guns of the South : a novel of the Civil War
Forfattere:Harry Turtledove
Info:New York : Ballantine Books, 1992.
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

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The Guns of the South af Harry Turtledove

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» Se også 48 omtaler

Engelsk (33)  Italiensk (1)  Alle sprog (34)
Viser 1-5 af 34 (næste | vis alle)
Mix sold knowledge of Civil War history with a time travel twist and you've got a wonderful read. Central characters include a rebel infantryman and Robert E. Lee. Lee seems imminently believable as a character although I personally think Robert E. Lee was more firmly Jeffersonian in his attitude towards slavery than given credit by the author...seeing it as a dying practice he nevertheless did not plan to impede. Everything else seems very plausible and the story is immensely entertaining. Highhly recommended. ( )
  NickHowes | Mar 14, 2017 |
If you like historical fiction with a dash of science fiction yet mostly a history of what the South would be like without losing to the Union, then this book is for you.

What I appreciated about Turtledove is how he did not make a big issue about 21st century politics from the white racists who stole a time machine and traveled to the waning days of the US Civil War.

Not only was there a lot of emphasis on life in the trenches, military strategy of Grant and Lee, but also what the parties at Jeff Davis’s house were like, what the slaves thought (not enough on this view) and following the life of Nate Claudell and Molly Bean (a woman who dresses as a man to fight in the war, and parttime “whore”) and what they go through in all this.

The Afrikaans want a white racist state that will ally itself with Nazi Germany in the future. They settle in to a town called Rivington (fictional) and immediately begin their reign of terror not only on the Union, but their manipulation of the men and women of the South. Pretty intense story here.

The Afrikaans though are a bit cardboard characters; Turtledove does not build them up to any great degree. There are funny moments as when he introduces the Confederate soldiers to instant coffee and freeze-dried meals.

The discovery of 20th century books, the way General Lee uses the information of the future to help not only his own political ends but the ends of his country are fascinating. The Afrikaans really shoot their own foot – if they were trying to create a slave state, why were they treating the Black man so badly – worse so than the Confederates were!

Final Note: Some may bristle a bit in making the South the good guys in this story, but frankly they were really coming of age as a nation, realizing what they were doing not only with demanding slave rights but also state rights, and realizing they were part of a global economy (pretty radical in 1868!).

The fates of Lincoln, Grant, and even Hayes are revealed. Check it out, not a bad read.


( )
  James_Mourgos | Dec 22, 2016 |
As this was my first venture into the world of Alternate History, I wasn't quite sure what to expect. Who better to take this journey with than the master of the genre', Harry Turtledove? I was pleased with my journey and will probably wander down this path again some day.

"The Guns of the South" looked at what would have happened to the outcome of the civil war if the South had been equipped with superior firepower - in this case, AK47's. The book begins not long after the South's demoralizing defeat at Gettysburg. General Robert E. Lee, distraught over the loss of thousands of his troops, is approached by a strange man who offers Lee the gift of thousands of the superior weapons. Lee and his generals are impressed with the firepower and ease of use they find when testing the weapons and soon put them in the hands of their soldiers.

In the next series of battles and skirmishes, the Confederates soon overpower and devastate their Union rivals and their single-shot Springfield rifles. This pattern continues through the next few months until it's clear to President Lincoln and General Ulysses S. Grant that a cessation of conflict is needed to save Union lives. The new automatic weapon used by the Rebels is killing Union soldiers by the thousands.

From this point, the book moves into a look at the new Confederate States, the election of a new President and the real reason why Lee was given the "gift" by the strange man. The book, though long, never drags and remains as true historically as an alternate history can. As a teacher of the subject matter, I was impressed with Turtledove's research, attention to detail, and ability to keep this from reading like an historical text.

If you are a fan of this genre' and/or especially a Civil War buff, then you will enjoy this unique look at a different ending to the War Between the States. ( )
  coachtim30 | Oct 2, 2016 |
Review: The Guns of the South by Harry Turtledove.

I really enjoyed this book. The author combined history with future scientific elements. He created a coming of the age idea and weaved it through the era of the Civil War. I found that intriguing.

The first part of the novel starts in the winter camp of the Army of Northern Virginia in 1864. It was months after Robert E. Lee defeated Gettysburg that he was now encountering some confrontation with the North when he was approached by a man offering him an unequal advantage in the war…Weapons from the 20th Century in the form of AK-47’s …but how could this be!! As it turns out this man is the leader of a group of South African whites who have traveled back in time to 1864 in an attempt to change the course of history and create in the Confederate States of America a power control for the white race into the 21st Century.

There were many battle scenarios and scenes that took up a lot of reading time but I thought it was interesting. The author also created a female character in the center of the battles as a soldier fighting in the war. This part of the novel ends with the Confederate Army on the lawn of the White House as General Lee accepts the surrender of Abraham Lincoln.

Many interesting things happen in the second half of the novel. The South has won its independence and now the question is what will they do with it? This is where Harry Turtledove reflected primarily through Robert E. Lee’s character that the Confederacy was not entirely at ease with the institution that sets it apart from its Northern neighbor. At this time Robert E. Lee starts his campaigning for Presidency. He begins to wonder whether slavery should continue and comes to a conclusion that puts him at odds with the foreign supporters who gave the South the means to achieve its independence.

I think the author of this book was clever by mixing the future in what the Civil War was really about. Was it about state’s rights and federalism as modern day Southern supporters claimed or was it about slavery and the domination of one race of men by another?
( )
  Juan-banjo | May 31, 2016 |
A group of apartheid-era Afrikaners time-travels to the American South during our Civil War to arm the Confederate army with AK-47s. The South wins. Lincoln loses the 1864 election and returns to Illinois to practice law. Robert E. Lee wins the Confederate presidency.

It's too bad the novel had to include the time-travel element, because the sci-fi/action scenes were the least engaging element of the book for me. I was bored when most of a chapter was devoted to how to dissemble and clean an AK-47, and disappointed that the book ended with a big shoot-'em-up with the Afrikaners. Let's just suppose the South won the Civil War. The Confederates still had a lot to reckon with, particularly what to do with the blacks who had already had a taste of freedom with emancipation and the movement of the Union armies. The book looks at these issues, too, and those are the parts of it I enjoyed most. That kind of focus truly makes the book thought-provoking "speculative" fiction--what I like about sci-fi the most.

Eliminate the time-travel element, and you also are rid of other stumbling blocks. Certainly, any sci-fi requires considerable suspension of disbelief, but my suspension could only go so far--especially when the premises laid out in the story end up contradicting themselves. For instance, when we finally see what serves as the Afrikaners' time portal, it ends up being a platform only 3'x3' square. From that little opening they were able to transport enough Ak-47s to equip the entire Confederate army (as well as mountains of other supplies, too)? Moreover, any time-travel book must deal with the Time Paradox: if the Afrikaners were successful in changing history to make the world more accepting slavery, why would they have felt the need to travel from the 20th century to disrupt the flow of history in the first place?

In short, the novel could have been better, but for its thoughtful passages, I'll give it three stars. ( )
  kvrfan | Apr 25, 2015 |
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"It is absolutely unique--without question the most fascinating Civil War novel I have ever read." Professor James M. McPherson Pultizer Prize-winning BATTLE CRY OF FREEDOM January 1864--General Robert E. Lee faces defeat. The Army of Northern Virginia is ragged and ill-equpped. Gettysburg has broken the back of the Confederacy and decimated its manpower. Then, Andries Rhoodie, a strange man with an unplaceable accent, approaches Lee with an extraordinary offer. Rhoodie demonstrates an amazing rifle: Its rate of fire is incredible, its lethal efficiency breathtaking--and Rhoodie guarantees unlimited quantitites to the Confederates. The name of the weapon is the AK-47.... Selected by the Science Fiction Book Club A Main Selection of the Military Book Club

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