HjemGrupperSnakMereZeitgeist
Søg På Websted
På dette site bruger vi cookies til at levere vores ydelser, forbedre performance, til analyseformål, og (hvis brugeren ikke er logget ind) til reklamer. Ved at bruge LibraryThing anerkender du at have læst og forstået vores vilkår og betingelser inklusive vores politik for håndtering af brugeroplysninger. Din brug af dette site og dets ydelser er underlagt disse vilkår og betingelser.
Hide this

Resultater fra Google Bøger

Klik på en miniature for at gå til Google Books

H. P. Lovecraft: Great Tales of Horror (Fall…
Indlæser...

H. P. Lovecraft: Great Tales of Horror (Fall River Classics) (udgave 2012)

af H. P. Lovecraft (Forfatter)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
562431,926 (3.76)7
H.P. Lovecraft: Great Tales of Horror features twenty of horror master H.P. Lovecraft's classic stories, among them some of the greatest works of horror fiction ever written, including: "The Rats in the Walls," "Pickman's Model," "The Colour out of Space," "The Call of Cthulhu," "The Dunwich Horror," "The Shadow over Innsmouth," "At the Mountains of Madness," "The Shadow out of Time," and "The Haunter of the Dark."… (mere)
Medlem:Akdeaton
Titel:H. P. Lovecraft: Great Tales of Horror (Fall River Classics)
Forfattere:H. P. Lovecraft (Forfatter)
Info:Fall River Press (2012), Edition: Later Printing, 600 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

Detaljer om værket

H. P. Lovecraft: Great Tales of Horror af H. P. Lovecraft

Indlæser...

Bliv medlem af LibraryThing for at finde ud af, om du vil kunne lide denne bog.

Der er ingen diskussionstråde på Snak om denne bog.

» Se også 7 omtaler

Viser 4 af 4
A whole range of novels, novellas, and short stories, all set in the same shared multiverse, impassionately overlooked by immeasurably old gods, and based around a city and its satellite towns in New England? It's not hard to see why Lovecraft is considered a major influence on Stephen King.

Having twenty of Lovecraft's works here in one place is both a blessing and a curse for his writing. As noted above, his fiction does take place in a shared universe and oftentimes the action occurs in or around Arkham, Massachusetts. This vast fictional universe – the Cthulhu Mythos – is easier to grasp when juxtaposed like this, and it's easier to appreciate the grandeur of Lovecraft's undertaking. Stories written decades apart still manage to link themes and present a consistent world-picture.

On the other hand, anthologies by authors of a particular genre always run the risk of becoming formulaic long before the end. Especially anthologies of this size: twenty stories covering six hundred pages. It's like a best-of album by Status Quo. You might like their songs individually but after twenty of their greatest hits you can't help but realise you've been listening to the same three chords for an hour, just with different words over the top.

Fortunately Lovecraft is no Status Quo. When the genre in question is “weird fiction” you can probably guess that things aren't going to become overly formulaic. I was slightly concerned going into the collection that my preconceptions about Lovecraft would prove themselves terribly accurate, that all his stories were essentially about guys wandering around somewhere then bumping into some Eldritch Abomination that is Too Terrible To Describe, and then the guy goes mad and dies. The end. There is, after all, only so many times an author can get away with playing the “indescribable” card before the reader starts to wonder if the subject is truly beyond description or whether the author is just inept or lazy. Lovecraft seems to have been aware of this, with several of his narrators initially lamenting that some abomination is beyond our language to describe, but then confessing that if you can see it you can probably make some attempt at describing it, and doing so. The beings encountered and events experienced in the tales might be confusing for the narrators, even discombobulating, but Lovecraft is never inept or lazy as a writer. ( )
  imlee | Jul 7, 2020 |
A whole range of novels, novellas, and short stories, all set in the same shared multiverse, impassionately overlooked by immeasurably old gods, and based around a city and its satellite towns in New England? It's not hard to see why Lovecraft is considered a major influence on Stephen King.

Having twenty of Lovecraft's works here in one place is both a blessing and a curse for his writing. As noted above, his fiction does take place in a shared universe and oftentimes the action occurs in or around Arkham, Massachusetts. This vast fictional universe – the Cthulhu Mythos – is easier to grasp when juxtaposed like this, and it's easier to appreciate the grandeur of Lovecraft's undertaking. Stories written decades apart still manage to link themes and present a consistent world-picture.

On the other hand, anthologies by authors of a particular genre always run the risk of becoming formulaic long before the end. Especially anthologies of this size: twenty stories covering six hundred pages. It's like a best-of album by Status Quo. You might like their songs individually but after twenty of their greatest hits you can't help but realise you've been listening to the same three chords for an hour, just with different words over the top.

Fortunately Lovecraft is no Status Quo. When the genre in question is “weird fiction” you can probably guess that things aren't going to become overly formulaic. I was slightly concerned going into the collection that my preconceptions about Lovecraft would prove themselves terribly accurate, that all his stories were essentially about guys wandering around somewhere then bumping into some Eldritch Abomination that is Too Terrible To Describe, and then the guy goes mad and dies. The end. There is, after all, only so many times an author can get away with playing the “indescribable” card before the reader starts to wonder if the subject is truly beyond description or whether the author is just inept or lazy. Lovecraft seems to have been aware of this, with several of his narrators initially lamenting that some abomination is beyond our language to describe, but then confessing that if you can see it you can probably make some attempt at describing it, and doing so. The beings encountered and events experienced in the tales might be confusing for the narrators, even discombobulating, but Lovecraft is never inept or lazy as a writer. ( )
  leezeebee | Jul 6, 2020 |
'Great Tales of Horror' collects the twenty most popular and important stories and novellas of H.P. Lovecraft. Each story is headed with a brief caption detailing where and when it was written, where published and Lovecraft's own feelings on the piece and its inspiration, where available.

I knew Lovecraft almost solely by reputation. I'd seen the Cthulhu plushies and Halloween costumes, and a friend has been hosting 'Arkham Horror' game nights for untold millennia, but I had never read anything until one fell night last year. It was past time I read the source material. I found this text only after whispered inquiries at disreputable booksellers led me to a gambreled shop in the back alleys of myth-haunted Brattleboro on a grey night, with the swollen gibbous moon shedding no light on its door. I hope it was a fevered dream, perhaps I just found it on a shelf at work and paid $2.

I don't want to be unfair, Lovecraft was carving out a whole new idea of weird fiction here, but most of the stories left me relieved that they were over. The best stories: "The Color Out of Space" (five stars all day long) and "The Shadow Over Innsmouth" were self-contained and had little of the babbling digressions that dragged down what otherwise would have been great pieces, such as "The Whisperer in the Darkness" and "At the Mountains of Madness". Lovecraft apparently understood that what's most horrible is left unsaid, but he didn't understand that when a narrator kept reminding the reader of everything left unsaid it defeats the point. Lovecraft begs the question and never answers. What he does answer are plot points made obvious by inordinate amount of foreshadowing - of course the writing in the box was his own, of course he was descended from monsters, etc.

I liked the book. Even when Lovecraft's writing was bad it was immense fun. Old New Englanders are just about gone now, but they are undeniably weird and taciturn, and its quite easy to imagine how someone could conceive of dark secrets behind those suspicious faces, residing in those interminably rundown colonial homes and scarcely hidden within those repressed wasp manners. I can understand, too, how hard it would be to keep good servants with dark chanting going on at all hours. Does the idleness of old money always lead to corrupt worship of forgotten gods?

For Lovecraft to even conceive of linking all of his writing together in this way is note-worthy. A better editor and a less racist world-view would have been nice, but as they are, half of these stories are essential reading for connoisseurs of strange fiction.

Start with "The Color out of Space" and "The Dunwich Horror", not the shortest of his titles, but clear favorites, and from there see if you want to go further in.

Some more in-depth reviews of longer works in order they appear in the book:

'At the Mountains of Madness' 11/23/14: 3 Stars

'The Case of Charles Dexter Ward' 1/26/15: 3 Stars

'The Whisperer in Darkness' 4/9/14: 3 Stars ( )
  ManWithAnAgenda | Feb 18, 2019 |
H.P. Lovecraft sits in a rather weird place in history. His books heavily influence modern horror, to the point where "Lovecraftian horror" is an actual subgenre. His mythos is legendary, constantly referenced in works of fiction, and Cthulhu even has his own little niche in pop culture, even among people who have never heard of the original author. Even my spellcheck knows about Cthulhu! Despite all this, his work really isn't widely read. It isn't reprinted nearly as much as other authors of the time period, it's harder to find in bookstores, and even though he is commonly considered one of the greatest horror authors of all time it's rare to find someone who has actually read his stories.

So, after many years of reading about the author, I finally decided to actually read his work. I must say, I'm impressed!

The important thing to remember when reading Lovecraft is how utterly different it was from what made up horror during the time period. When most horror authors were writing about the supernatural; ghosts, vampires, and demons, he was writing about the cosmic. Sure, alien invaders weren't a new concept, H.G. Wells had written War of the Worlds more than a decade before he first published a story, but he made them the stuff of nightmares. Dark, horrible, madness-inducing monsters from the depths of space and time. It was fairly unique for the time.

I say all that, because I'll be the first to admit that his stories are often dense, and plotless. I would consider it the horror version of Tolkien's The Siilmarillion. It's all about the lore, and Lovecraft's strength was world-building. He didn't just write stories, he created believable worlds, alien races, and alternate histories. Sure, there are some plot-driven stories, but his best and most memorable stories are the ones that describe some horrifying cosmic monstrosity. Cthulhu, Yog-Sothoth, Nyarlathotep...THESE are what Lovecraft gave us, and it has inspired horror authors for nearly a hundred years now. ( )
  Ape | Aug 13, 2016 |
Viser 4 af 4

» Tilføj andre forfattere (3 mulige)

Forfatter navnRolleHvilken slags forfatterVærk?Status
H. P. Lovecraftprimær forfatteralle udgaverberegnet
Brock, CharlesOmslagsdesignermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Dziemianowicz, StefanIntroduktionmedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
MacKenzie, DanaIllustratormedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Du bliver nødt til at logge ind for at redigere data i Almen Viden.
For mere hjælp se Almen Viden hjælpesiden.
Kanonisk titel
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Originaltitel
Alternative titler
Oprindelig udgivelsesdato
Personer/Figurer
Vigtige steder
Vigtige begivenheder
Beslægtede film
Priser og hædersbevisninger
Indskrift
Tilegnelse
Første ord
Citater
Sidste ord
Oplysning om flertydighed
Forlagets redaktører
Bagsidecitater
Originalsprog
Canonical DDC/MDS

Henvisninger til dette værk andre steder.

Wikipedia på engelsk

Ingen

H.P. Lovecraft: Great Tales of Horror features twenty of horror master H.P. Lovecraft's classic stories, among them some of the greatest works of horror fiction ever written, including: "The Rats in the Walls," "Pickman's Model," "The Colour out of Space," "The Call of Cthulhu," "The Dunwich Horror," "The Shadow over Innsmouth," "At the Mountains of Madness," "The Shadow out of Time," and "The Haunter of the Dark."

No library descriptions found.

Beskrivelse af bogen
Haiku-resume

Quick Links

Populære omslag

Vurdering

Gennemsnit: (3.76)
0.5 1
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 4
3.5 1
4 9
4.5
5 5

Er det dig?

Bliv LibraryThing-forfatter.

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Brugerbetingelser/Håndtering af brugeroplysninger | Hjælp/FAQs | Blog | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterladte biblioteker | Tidlige Anmeldere | Almen Viden | 159,063,627 bøger! | Topbjælke: Altid synlig