HjemGrupperSnakMereZeitgeist
På dette site bruger vi cookies til at levere vores ydelser, forbedre performance, til analyseformål, og (hvis brugeren ikke er logget ind) til reklamer. Ved at bruge LibraryThing anerkender du at have læst og forstået vores vilkår og betingelser inklusive vores politik for håndtering af brugeroplysninger. Din brug af dette site og dets ydelser er underlagt disse vilkår og betingelser.
Hide this

Resultater fra Google Bøger

Klik på en miniature for at gå til Google Books

The dark heart of Italy af Tobias Jones
Indlæser...

The dark heart of Italy (udgave 2003)

af Tobias Jones

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
5181534,690 (3.58)14
In 1999 Tobias Jones immigrated to Italy, expecting to discover the pastoral bliss described by centuries of foreign visitors. Instead, he found a very different country: one besieged by unfathomable terrorism and deep-seated paranoia. The Dark Heart of Italy is Jones's account of his four-year voyage across the Italian peninsula. Jones writes not just about Italy's art, climate, and cuisine but also about the much livelier and stranger sides of the Bel Paese: the language, soccer, Catholicism, cinema, television, and terrorism. Why, he wonders, does the parliament need a "slaughter commission"? Why do bombs still explode every time politics start getting serious? Why does everyone urge him to go home as soon as possible, saying that Italy is a "brothel"? Most of all, why does one man, Silvio Berlusconi-in the words of a famous song-appear to own everything from Padre Nostro (Our Father) to Cosa Nostra (the Mafia)? The Italy that emerges from Jones's travels is a country scarred by civil wars and "illustrious corpses"; a country that is proudly visual rather than verbal, based on aesthetics rather than ethics; a country where crime is hardly ever followed by punishment; a place of incredible illusionism, where it is impossible to distinguish fantasy from reality and fact from fiction.… (mere)
Medlem:alanhutton
Titel:The dark heart of Italy
Forfattere:Tobias Jones
Info:London : Faber and Faber, 2003.
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

Detaljer om værket

The Dark Heart of Italy af Tobias Jones

Ingen.

Europe (316)
Indlæser...

Bliv medlem af LibraryThing for at finde ud af, om du vil kunne lide denne bog.

Der er ingen diskussionstråde på Snak om denne bog.

» Se også 14 omtaler

Viser 1-5 af 15 (næste | vis alle)
This is a book written and published about the last time I visited northern Italy and Florence (2004) and journalistically covers an era in which I intermittently lived and loved there (1976-2003). I wanted to read, in retrospect, what was reported, thru Tobias Jones' English, younger, naïve, and rather successful, eyes. Also this reportage and travel book comes from the perspective of a British male in love with an Italian (whom he has married and has 3 children), soccer, and Italy. This work is written with a rather Leftist, utopian bent missing the knowledge and lacking the understanding of the courtly, Latin history and traditions, which seems so opaque to the democratic Anglo-Saxon culture. ( )
1 stem JayLivernois | Apr 9, 2018 |
I enjoyed reading this book and it did provide me with an interesting introduction to recent Italian history and current affairs. There are chapters dedicated to the period of native left vs right wing terrorism, other organised crime and the state's response, Italian TV, football, rampant illegal building etc etc which are loosely tied together with reference to recurring themes of corruption, poor governance, regional loyalism and other particular aspects of `Italian culture'. It would not be honest of me to say that much of what I read - mostly the good or quirky rather than the bad - did not ring true from my own experiences of Italian friends and holidays there.

However, it may seem trite but it is probably necessary to add that the book is essentially a series of gross generalisations, with all of the issues associated with these. In summary, the DHoI is entertaining and certainly informative but far from analytically rigorous. ( )
  cwhouston | Nov 21, 2010 |
If you read this book and like me appreciate it if certain things just work, then you will understand you can never live in Italy. A well written, pacy introduction to Italian society from an outsider's perspective. ( )
  Warlord74 | Oct 29, 2010 |
  benskinner | Sep 17, 2009 |
The wonder of this book is not that it reveals something new, even at the time it was originally written (2003), because it doesn't, but that the author is still alive, in Italy. Am I cynic? Maybe.

Italy is a fantastic country with a diversity of cultures and kitchens, full of beauty, but it's a country both high on civilization and low on it. Every time I visit the country I feel a calm descending on me, revelling in ordering a macchiato in the knowledge I'll get some high quality coffee. In many ways 'italian' to me is a by-word for style.

But every time I'm also anguished by the stubborn backwardness. Internet connection at your hotel? Weeeeell... One time I spent a day and a half arguing with staff before they said that of course could I have an internet connection - for €5/30 minutes. Two days and ceaseless arguments later they actually admitted that I could have a 24 hour access card for €18.
At that time I had almost left for another hotel, more forthcoming on the internet issue, had it not been for the fact that my hotel had a socket I could use to recharge my laptop while the other one (where a colleague of mine stayed) demanded a special adapter... and the conference centre hosting the conference we attended offered free internet (but a lack of sockets).

I also despair at the highways leading nowhere, the strikes ("buses to Palermo today, sorry, strike, you'll have to take the train", "to Olbia? Well, it's a strike so I don't know which trains will run but there's on in an hour which will take you half the way, if it leaves"), the skeleton buildings that never will be finished...

It's also a violent country, strung out on each side of a polarised rift that to all evidence seems to be much the same - political violence, nepotism, angry corrupted old men, wherever you go. I long ago gave up on knowing who was in power, other than when it's that man Berlusconi, and that is mainly down to the fact that he distinguishes himself as a fount of idiocy.

The author discusses the politics, the culture, and a lot of things Italian, and was accused of paining a too dark a picture, but personally I think his love for his adopted country is evident. That makes the book more than the righteous pamphlet it could had been - it makes it enjoyable.

He comes to no conclusion, naturally - this is more a chronicle than anything else. But as such it's very good.

If you have any interest in understanding the diversity of cultures that exists on this planet this book this book ought to be high on your must-read list. ( )
4 stem Busifer | Jan 17, 2009 |
Viser 1-5 af 15 (næste | vis alle)
ingen anmeldelser | tilføj en anmeldelse
Du bliver nødt til at logge ind for at redigere data i Almen Viden.
For mere hjælp se Almen Viden hjælpesiden.
Kanonisk titel
Originaltitel
Alternative titler
Oprindelig udgivelsesdato
Personer/Figurer
Vigtige steder
Information fra den hollandske Almen Viden. Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Vigtige begivenheder
Beslægtede film
Priser og hædersbevisninger
Indskrift
Tilegnelse
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
For Francesca Lenzi
Første ord
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Preface
'Travellers, without exception,' wrote Stendhal in 1824, 'are wont to confine their descriptions of Italy to the realm of the inanimate; their portraits concern only the mountains, the sites, the sublime manifestations of nature in that happy land ...' Even today, that is still very much the case.
Citater
Sidste ord
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
(Klik for at vise Advarsel: Kan indeholde afsløringer.)
Oplysning om flertydighed
Forlagets redaktører
Bagsidecitater
Originalsprog
Canonical DDC/MDS

Henvisninger til dette værk andre steder.

Wikipedia på engelsk (1)

In 1999 Tobias Jones immigrated to Italy, expecting to discover the pastoral bliss described by centuries of foreign visitors. Instead, he found a very different country: one besieged by unfathomable terrorism and deep-seated paranoia. The Dark Heart of Italy is Jones's account of his four-year voyage across the Italian peninsula. Jones writes not just about Italy's art, climate, and cuisine but also about the much livelier and stranger sides of the Bel Paese: the language, soccer, Catholicism, cinema, television, and terrorism. Why, he wonders, does the parliament need a "slaughter commission"? Why do bombs still explode every time politics start getting serious? Why does everyone urge him to go home as soon as possible, saying that Italy is a "brothel"? Most of all, why does one man, Silvio Berlusconi-in the words of a famous song-appear to own everything from Padre Nostro (Our Father) to Cosa Nostra (the Mafia)? The Italy that emerges from Jones's travels is a country scarred by civil wars and "illustrious corpses"; a country that is proudly visual rather than verbal, based on aesthetics rather than ethics; a country where crime is hardly ever followed by punishment; a place of incredible illusionism, where it is impossible to distinguish fantasy from reality and fact from fiction.

No library descriptions found.

Beskrivelse af bogen
Haiku-resume

Quick Links

Populære omslag

Vurdering

Gennemsnit: (3.58)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 8
2.5 3
3 19
3.5 10
4 38
4.5 3
5 8

Er det dig?

Bliv LibraryThing-forfatter.

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Brugerbetingelser/Håndtering af brugeroplysninger | Hjælp/FAQs | Blog | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterladte biblioteker | Tidlige Anmeldere | Almen Viden | 155,574,665 bøger! | Topbjælke: Altid synlig