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Enter Jeeves: 15 Early Stories

af P. G. Wodehouse

Andre forfattere: David A. Jasen (Redaktør)

Serier: Jeeves (Short stories)

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351554,875 (4.05)15
Born in England in 1881, Sir P(elham) G(renville) Wodehouse delighted generations of readers with his whimsical tales of the deliciously dim aristocrat Bertie Wooster and Jeeves, his brainy, imperturbable manservant. Many are unaware, however, that Bertie had a prototype -- Reggie Pepper -- who stumbled into the same worrying situations involving old school chums with romantic troubles, irate female relatives, threatening suitors, and other troublemakers. This is the only collection to contain the first eight Jeeves short stories as well as the complete Reggie Pepper series. Included are such delightful tales as "Extricating Young Gussie," "The Aunt and the Sluggard," Leave It to Jeeves," "Jeeves and the Hard-Boiled Egg," "Absent Treatment, "Rallying Round Clarence," "Concealed Art," and more. Awash in an eternal glow of old-boy camaraderie, these stories offer hours of delightfully diverting entertainment sure to recaptivate Wodehouse fans of old as well as tickling the fancy of new readers, who will soon find themselves caught up in the splendidly superficial antics of Messrs. Wooster, Jeeves, Pepper, et al.… (mere)

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Viser 5 af 5
Not only does this have early Wooster and Jeeves stories----not sure it's all of them, though---but also, purportedly, the complete set of Reggie Pepper, a forerunner of Bertie Wooster, albeit without Jeeves. Most of the Reggie stories were new to me, making this a nice find. ( )
  raizel | Dec 27, 2012 |
I've just started reading Wodehouse and I'm gald I read one of the novels first. The stories in this collection aren't bad, but they do get a bit repetitive. Not surprising given that they were likely published over a period of time and the shortness tends to make the formula more noticeable.

On the other hand, there's what I consider to be an absolutely brilliant Jeeves story that's a nice twist on the character in "Jeeves in the Springtime". I don't want to ruin the surprise (which is somewhat guessable, but still fun). The problem being if you haven't read one or two of the novels you probably don't get how it steps out of character. (Or rather, appreciate it fro the brief glimpse you get into his character when he's not being the most incredible butler on earth.)

I'll probably pick a few more Wodehouse to people. I don't know though if I'd recommend this collection, except for the purposes of the short story I mention above. ( )
  JonathanGorman | May 6, 2011 |
I adore Jeeves and Bertie, but mostly I love Plum's wordplay. ( )
1 stem ofstoneandice | Jul 28, 2010 |
Having heard a lot of my fellow LTers rave about P. G. Wodehouse, I was eager to get to this collection of early Bertie and Jeeves stories. Maybe I was expecting too much. Like the reviewer below, I found them to be very repetitive. Wodehouse creates two memorable characters who, by now, have become archetypes: the rather easily flustered but always conscious that he needs to keep his cool young British man of the upper class, and his wise, all-knowing "man" who solves his dilemmas. Apparently young artistocrats falling for vaudeville ingenues was a popular trope of the time, since it appears in more than half of the stories.

In short, this was a quick, light read with some insight into the facade of the British upper class, but I probably won't be seeking out more books by Wodehouse. ( )
  Cariola | Jul 5, 2010 |
Well, my first Wodehouse has come and gone and, to be honest, I'm a bit disappointed. Not that I didn't like his style or sense of humour, but I'd heard so many good things about him here on LT that I can't help feeling that I've somehow missed something. Like the Universe has conspired to keep me from enjoying a perfectly good author. I enjoyed some parts of the book and it definitely had its funny moments. But, overall, the short stories were repetitive, both thematically and stylistically and included way too many one-dimensional characters, including the protagonists. The Wooster and Jeeves stories? Rich and idle Englishman's uncle/aunt threatens to cut his allowance if the fella' doesn't meet a particular request of said aunt or uncle's. He asks for help from another rich and idle gentleman, Bertie Wooster. His butler, Jeeves usually comes up with a plan and solves the problem. In exchange, Bertie gets rid of a particular clothing item that offends Jeeves's exquisite taste. Once it's an ugly suit, in another story, it's a moustache (okay, not a clothing item), in a different one a pair of socks. The Reggie Pepper stories? Almost the same plot, except this time he solves his friends' problems on his own, without any butler being dragged in. It's like the novelist is writing the same narrative over and over again. Of course, this is some of Wodehouse's earliest stuff we're talking about, so I'd say some faults are excusable to a certain degree. It's certainly not unusual for an author, especially a young one, to write the same story again and again until he perfects it. If the author later gains fame, all the variations of those stories are almost sure to find some greedy bastard willing to publish them. And I wish they wouldn't. Just because some authors' fans would even read their shopping lists, doesn't mean they should be given the chance to. If I wasn't so obsessed about finishing all books started if it kills me, I would've probably stopped midway through. And would've probably enjoyed the book more if I had. After a while, however, it felt extremely tiring reading almost identical plots narrated using an almost identical choice of words. I realize this was probably not the ideal Wodehouse to start with, so I'm not giving up on the chap just yet. Next time I'll try one of his novels - not least because it's trickier to find the same story ad nauseam in novel form :)

So, to conclude -
Didn't like: repetitive storylines, repetitive choice of words, one-dimensional characters, too high expectations that weren't met

Liked: witty, funny parts, very characteristic vocabulary and style (the words "chap" , "chump", "rummy", the adding of "-what?" after every sentence and the expression "wasn't it Shakespeare or some other smart chap that said..." are now part of my vocabulary. If I ever wanna do a Wodehouse imitation, I'll be able to pull it off now :P) ( )
4 stem girlunderglass | Mar 15, 2009 |
Viser 5 af 5
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Forfatter navnRolleHvilken slags forfatterVærk?Status
Wodehouse, P. G.Forfatterprimær forfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Jasen, David A.Redaktørmedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet

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Jeeves (Short stories)

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Born in England in 1881, Sir P(elham) G(renville) Wodehouse delighted generations of readers with his whimsical tales of the deliciously dim aristocrat Bertie Wooster and Jeeves, his brainy, imperturbable manservant. Many are unaware, however, that Bertie had a prototype -- Reggie Pepper -- who stumbled into the same worrying situations involving old school chums with romantic troubles, irate female relatives, threatening suitors, and other troublemakers. This is the only collection to contain the first eight Jeeves short stories as well as the complete Reggie Pepper series. Included are such delightful tales as "Extricating Young Gussie," "The Aunt and the Sluggard," Leave It to Jeeves," "Jeeves and the Hard-Boiled Egg," "Absent Treatment, "Rallying Round Clarence," "Concealed Art," and more. Awash in an eternal glow of old-boy camaraderie, these stories offer hours of delightfully diverting entertainment sure to recaptivate Wodehouse fans of old as well as tickling the fancy of new readers, who will soon find themselves caught up in the splendidly superficial antics of Messrs. Wooster, Jeeves, Pepper, et al.

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