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Your Inner Fish: A Journey into the 3.5-Billion-Year History of the Human…

af Neil Shubin

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MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
2,123635,381 (3.94)154
Neil Shubin, a leading paleontologist and professor of anatomy who discovered Tiktaalik--the "missing link" that made headlines around the world in April 2006--tells the story of evolution by tracing the organs of the human body back millions of years, long before the first creatures walked the earth. By examining fossils and DNA, Shubin shows us that our hands actually resemble fish fins, our head is organized like that of a long-extinct jawless fish, and major parts of our genome look and function like those of worms and bacteria.--From publisher description.… (mere)
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» Se også 154 omtaler

Engelsk (60)  Hollandsk (1)  Norsk (1)  Italiensk (1)  Alle sprog (63)
Viser 1-5 af 63 (næste | vis alle)
Your Inner Fish
A Journey into the 3.5-Billion-Year History of the Human Body
By: Neil Shubin
This was a terrific look at how nature was a recycler of ideas! Through the years if something didn't work nature didn't necessarily make a new creature but used recycled ideas on creatures to see where that would lead. The book just didn't cover paleontology but also genetics, biology, and more. It was very informative and interesting! The way the information is presented is light and comfortable, touch of humor, and easy to follow. If this genre interests you, then this is a must read! ( )
  MontzaleeW | Dec 29, 2020 |
I read the German translation. There were a few mistakes I noticed, but the translation was smooth and easy to read.

In many ways I agree with the reviewers who felt that a lot of the detail could easily have been left out - and I skimmed and skipped when it got too much for me. I certainly realized early on that I would not enjoy most aspects of his job. This starts with crawling around in snow and slush in the middle of summer, and goes on to staring at similar features of various animals under a microscope for hours on end. Or even to trying to teach human anatomy to college premed majors. (For that matter, even learning the names of every bone and muscle myself.)

On the other hand, what shone brightly from every page was the fact that Shubin does enjoy his work. He is fascinated by the details he goes on (and on) about. He is enthusiastic about teaching.

So if lots of details about fish innards are not really your thing, and you aren't really ready for your inner sea anemone, be prepared to skip some parts. Oh, but don't miss the explanation of why human males get hernias. Or did just enjoy that because my husband was recently diagnosed with one? Well, you never know what detail might just be interesting.

It is still worthwhile reading the book for the general view of human development and the reminder that we should try to keep to our sense of wonder about the world. ( )
  MarthaJeanne | Oct 23, 2020 |
It was ok...interesting but could have been an article rather than a book. ( )
  baruthcook | Aug 26, 2020 |
A fairly good lay introduction to developmental biology, although there were several sections I think could have been clarified further or even expanded. I know some reviewers have said it came across as an argument for evolution, but to me it simply presupposed evolution and common ancestry and proceeded from there.

If you've ever wondered what you have in common with a sea anemone, one of the answers is that you and the sea anemone both use versions of the same gene, called hox, to organize an important body axis. In humans, it's the anterior-posterior axis, or "head to tail" in higher animals. Sea anemones obviously have different parts, and in them the equivalent axis is known as the oral-aboral axis. We, along with frogs and mice, also share commonalities in the genes responsible for organizing the dorsal and ventral sides of the body, to the extent that the product of one of these genes is interchangeable between frogs and sea anemones! ( )
  Jennifer708 | Mar 21, 2020 |
A fairly good lay introduction to developmental biology, although there were several sections I think could have been clarified further or even expanded. I know some reviewers have said it came across as an argument for evolution, but to me it simply presupposed evolution and common ancestry and proceeded from there.

If you've ever wondered what you have in common with a sea anemone, one of the answers is that you and the sea anemone both use versions of the same gene, called hox, to organize an important body axis. In humans, it's the anterior-posterior axis, or "head to tail" in higher animals. Sea anemones obviously have different parts, and in them the equivalent axis is known as the oral-aboral axis. We, along with frogs and mice, also share commonalities in the genes responsible for organizing the dorsal and ventral sides of the body, to the extent that the product of one of these genes is interchangeable between frogs and sea anemones! ( )
  Jennifer708 | Mar 21, 2020 |
Viser 1-5 af 63 (næste | vis alle)
Shubin's engaging book reveals our fishy origins (for which we can thank hiccupping and hernias) and shows how life on Earth is profoundly interrelated. A book after Darwin's heart.
tilføjet af waitingtoderail | RedigerThe Guardian, PD Smith (Jan 31, 2009)
 
Shubin connects with sections on his own work discovering fossils, and on the sometimes surprising roots of modern human complaints. But the paleontologist can't escape his own academic history — much of Your Inner Fish reads like a cross between fleshed-out lecture notes and a dummed-down textbook.
 
Your Inner Fish combines Shubin's and others' discoveries to present a twenty-first-century anatomy lesson. The simple, passionate writing may turn more than a few high-school students into aspiring biologists.
tilføjet af jlelliott | RedigerNature, Carl Zimmer (pay site) (Jan 17, 2008)
 

» Tilføj andre forfattere (3 mulige)

Forfatter navnRolleHvilken slags forfatterVærk?Status
Shubin, Neilprimær forfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Barth, BrianOmslagsdesignermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Cashman, MarcFortællermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Monoyios, KalliopiIllustratormedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Nieuwstadt, Mark vanOversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
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Neil Shubin, a leading paleontologist and professor of anatomy who discovered Tiktaalik--the "missing link" that made headlines around the world in April 2006--tells the story of evolution by tracing the organs of the human body back millions of years, long before the first creatures walked the earth. By examining fossils and DNA, Shubin shows us that our hands actually resemble fish fins, our head is organized like that of a long-extinct jawless fish, and major parts of our genome look and function like those of worms and bacteria.--From publisher description.

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