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God's Secretaries: The Making of the King…
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God's Secretaries: The Making of the King James Bible (udgave 2003)

af Adam Nicolson (Forfatter)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
1,534369,005 (3.73)102
"A net of complex currents flowed across Jacobean England. This was the England of Shakespeare, Jonson and Bacon; of the Gunpowder Plot; the worst outbreak of the plague England had ever seen; Arcadian landscapes; murderous, toxic slums; and, above all, of sometimes overwhelming religious passion. Jacobean England was both more godly and less godly than it had ever been, and the entire culture was drawn taut between the polarities." "This was the world that created the King James Bible. It is the greatest work of English prose ever written, and it is no coincidence that the translation was made at the moment "Englishness" and the English language had come into its first passionate maturity. Boisterous, elegant, subtle, majestic, finely nuanced, sonorous and musical, the English of Jacobean England has a more encompassing idea of its own reach and scope than any before or since. It is a form of the language that drips with potency and sensitivity. The age, with all its conflicts, explains the book." "The sponsor and guide of the whole Bible project was the King himself, the brilliant, ugly and profoundly peace-loving James the Sixth of Scotland and First of England. Trained almost from birth to manage the rivalries of political factions at home, James saw in England the chance for a sort of irenic Eden over which the new translation of the Bible was to preside. It was to be a Bible for everyone, and as God's lieutenant on earth, he would use it to unify his kingdom. The dream of Jacobean peace, guaranteed by an elision of royal power and divine glory, lies behind a Bible of extraordinary grace and everlasting literary power." "About fifty scholars from Cambridge, Oxford and London did the work, drawing on many previous versions, and created a text which, for all its failings, has never been equaled. That is the central question of this book: How did this group of near-anonymous divines, muddled, drunk, self-serving, ambitious, ruthless, obsequious, pedantic and flawed as they were, manage to bring off this astonishing translation? How did such ordinary men make such extraordinary prose? In God's Secretaries, Adam Nicolson gives a fascinating and dramatic account of the accession and ambition of the first Stuart king; of the scholars who labored for seven years to create his Bible; of the influences that shaped their work and of the beliefs that colored their world, immersing us in an age whose greatest monument is not a painting or a building, but a book."--BOOK JACKET.… (mere)
Medlem:HH_Library
Titel:God's Secretaries: The Making of the King James Bible
Forfattere:Adam Nicolson (Forfatter)
Info:Harper (2003), Edition: 1st, 281 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

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God's Secretaries: The Making of the King James Bible af Adam Nicolson

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God's Secretaries by Adam Nicholson is focused on the translators of the King James Bible, and the political climate they worked in, rather than on the translation itself. The presents a behind-the-scenes view of Jacobean England and the events that led to King James's approval of a new version of the English Bible.

I've read a few books on the early English versions of the Bible, but the perspective presented in God's Secretaries is one I hadn't read before. The book was quite informative, although at times it got tedious. For someone who already knows a bit about the history of English Bible translations, this could be a good book to fill in some of the gaps. I would not recommend this book to someone who is looking for a general overview of English Bible Translations. ( )
  BibleQuestions | Aug 8, 2021 |
Could have been more interesting than it was, plus I questioned some of Nicolson's theses. ( )
  AldusManutius | Jul 5, 2020 |
Jacobean England was the England of Shakespeare, Jonson, and Bacon. Jacobean England was both more godly and less godly than the country had ever been, and the entire culture was drawn taut between these polarities. This was the world that created the King James Bible. It is no coincidence that the translation was made at the moment "Englishness." The English language had come into its first passionate maturity. The English of Jacobean England has a more encompassing idea of its scope than any form of the language before or since. It drips with potency and sensitivity.
  PAFM | Apr 20, 2020 |
I have no idea how the author managed to fill so many pages with so little information. The entire book seemed filled with nothing but inference and speculation.
  fionaanne | Dec 6, 2019 |
This is not a Christian work. It is a history of the people and the times surrounding the translation and publication of the world's best-selling book. And it is an engaging account, with only a little bit of bias exhibited in the writing.

The author used and credited the research of others, expanding it whenever possible with recent discoveries from the ancient libraries of England. Unfortunately the majority of documentation was lost over the centuries, especially in the Great Fire of London in 1666, and the full history is hidden. The people involved in the making of the King James Bible are not vilified (for the most part), but are shown for what they were: flawed but mainly sincere men from religious and non-religious vocations within seventeenth century Britain.

Having already read about the religious persecutions of the time, I was disappointed in what I perceived as a recurring bias against the Puritan and Separatist movements, but the author did a good job recounting the history of the group that would later land in the new world and be known as the Pilgrims. I was also disappointed that he repeated the oft-told but disputable claims of some regarding manuscript evidence, but for most readers it won't matter.

Overall, a good though flawed history. ( )
  fuzzi | Jun 8, 2019 |
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Few moments in English history have been more hungry for the future, its mercurial possibilities and its hope of richness, than the spring of 1603.
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God's Secretaries: the Making of the King James Bible (U.S. title) was published in the UK as "Power and Glory: Jacobean England and the Making of the King James Bible."
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"A net of complex currents flowed across Jacobean England. This was the England of Shakespeare, Jonson and Bacon; of the Gunpowder Plot; the worst outbreak of the plague England had ever seen; Arcadian landscapes; murderous, toxic slums; and, above all, of sometimes overwhelming religious passion. Jacobean England was both more godly and less godly than it had ever been, and the entire culture was drawn taut between the polarities." "This was the world that created the King James Bible. It is the greatest work of English prose ever written, and it is no coincidence that the translation was made at the moment "Englishness" and the English language had come into its first passionate maturity. Boisterous, elegant, subtle, majestic, finely nuanced, sonorous and musical, the English of Jacobean England has a more encompassing idea of its own reach and scope than any before or since. It is a form of the language that drips with potency and sensitivity. The age, with all its conflicts, explains the book." "The sponsor and guide of the whole Bible project was the King himself, the brilliant, ugly and profoundly peace-loving James the Sixth of Scotland and First of England. Trained almost from birth to manage the rivalries of political factions at home, James saw in England the chance for a sort of irenic Eden over which the new translation of the Bible was to preside. It was to be a Bible for everyone, and as God's lieutenant on earth, he would use it to unify his kingdom. The dream of Jacobean peace, guaranteed by an elision of royal power and divine glory, lies behind a Bible of extraordinary grace and everlasting literary power." "About fifty scholars from Cambridge, Oxford and London did the work, drawing on many previous versions, and created a text which, for all its failings, has never been equaled. That is the central question of this book: How did this group of near-anonymous divines, muddled, drunk, self-serving, ambitious, ruthless, obsequious, pedantic and flawed as they were, manage to bring off this astonishing translation? How did such ordinary men make such extraordinary prose? In God's Secretaries, Adam Nicolson gives a fascinating and dramatic account of the accession and ambition of the first Stuart king; of the scholars who labored for seven years to create his Bible; of the influences that shaped their work and of the beliefs that colored their world, immersing us in an age whose greatest monument is not a painting or a building, but a book."--BOOK JACKET.

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