HjemGrupperSnakMereZeitgeist
Søg På Websted
På dette site bruger vi cookies til at levere vores ydelser, forbedre performance, til analyseformål, og (hvis brugeren ikke er logget ind) til reklamer. Ved at bruge LibraryThing anerkender du at have læst og forstået vores vilkår og betingelser inklusive vores politik for håndtering af brugeroplysninger. Din brug af dette site og dets ydelser er underlagt disse vilkår og betingelser.
Hide this

Resultater fra Google Bøger

Klik på en miniature for at gå til Google Books

Seven Deadly Wonders: A Novel (1) (Jack…
Indlæser...

Seven Deadly Wonders: A Novel (1) (Jack West, Jr.) (udgave 2006)

af Matthew Reilly (Forfatter)

Serier: Jack West Junior (1)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
1,815537,117 (3.61)47
Den største skattejagt nogensinde bliver en realitet, da rivaliserende lande og forskellige terrorbander i desperat kapløb forsøger at lokalisere den gamle verdens syv underværker. Hver af disse skjuler nemlig ét stykke af den gyldne sten, som i oldtiden prydede den store pyramide i Giza og tillagdes uindskrænket magt.… (mere)
Medlem:LindaCarmon
Titel:Seven Deadly Wonders: A Novel (1) (Jack West, Jr.)
Forfattere:Matthew Reilly (Forfatter)
Info:Pocket Books (2006), Edition: Pf, 576 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:****
Nøgleord:Ingen

Detaljer om værket

De syv underværker af Matthew Reilly

  1. 30
    The Six Sacred Stones af Matthew Reilly (mestraus)
    mestraus: This second installment of the three part Jack West Jr trilogy is just as fast paced and gripping as 7 Deadly Wonders. This book does not work as a stand alone book, and leaves readers eager for the, as of yet unreleased, third and final chapter to this tall tale.… (mere)
Indlæser...

Bliv medlem af LibraryThing for at finde ud af, om du vil kunne lide denne bog.

Der er ingen diskussionstråde på Snak om denne bog.

» Se også 47 omtaler

Engelsk (51)  Hollandsk (2)  Alle sprog (53)
Viser 1-5 af 53 (næste | vis alle)
Well, it was better than Scarecrow.

I thought the idea was great but lacked something in the execution, especially in the action scenes. Would have made a great movie though.

2.5* ( )
  Lillian_Francis | Feb 24, 2021 |
A few weeks ago someone in my apartment building left a bunch of old magazines and recipe books in the lobby on a shelf that acts as a kind of internal charity shop. Amongst the 2008 editions of Marie Claire magazines was this book. Judging the book by its cover I assumed it would be god-awful pop fiction riding the Dan Brown bandwagon, so I of course picked it up and read it today on a return trip to Oxford.

I confess, the book isn't terrible. I'm used to suspending my sense of disbelief when reading, but I wasn't aware when I started it that Matthew Reilly books require the reader to completely disregard the physical rules of our universe, maybe if I'd been forewarned I'd have enjoyed the book more. But like I said: it wasn't terrible.

There are some issues with the book and I'll get them out of the way quickly. First, Matthew Reilly loves italics. I got the distinct impression he read his first draft and decided there just weren't enough slanty letters, so dropped italic dust all over each page, oftentimes on words that don't even need emphasis.

He also has a thing for exclamation marks. I'm honestly not used to seeing these outside of speech. If something dramatic happens in a book I assume I'll notice, I don't really need an exclamation mark to tell me.

Another punctuation mark of choice is the ellipsis. Far too many times something dramatic started happeneing…
… and then was resolved on the next line. If this were a tv series and those dots represented seven days between broadcasts then they would invoke a lot of tension, but when they involve dropping my eyes to the next line, something they have to do every dozen words anyway, all it does is irk.

The three issues above are infused in a sentence of comedic genius about half way into the book. I present my favourite sentence in Seven Ancient Wonders:

They were being attacked…
from the golf course!

A perhaps misplaced issue I had with the book is the presence of schematic diagrams of the various places visited in the text. They kind of give the impression that the author doesn't quite trust in his ability to describe the current location, or the reader's ability to imagine it.

Finally, and most anally, there's a lot of Egyptian writing mentioned in the book. At their first appearance Reilly called the symbols hieroglyphs, and I rejoiced. Then the next time he said hieroglyphics, and I died a little. He couldn't seem to figure out which one he should use so did what I used to do on French exams and used them both alternately, figuring he'd get at least half of them right. On a similarly pedantic note, at one point he describes a cross shaped room as being "cross shaped", then later describes an identically shaped room as being "†-shaped". Why?

Despite all that the book zips along at such a pace that by the time any of these things annoyed me it was already a few pages passed. It's sillier than Da Vinci Code but, as the author says in an interview at the end of the book, the book is more Indiana Jones than Robert Langdon. Which I'd guessed the nineteenth time the heroes triggered a trap that sent a massive boulder chasing them down a slope…
… and then they dived out of the way just in time! ( )
  imlee | Jul 7, 2020 |
A few weeks ago someone in my apartment building left a bunch of old magazines and recipe books in the lobby on a shelf that acts as a kind of internal charity shop. Amongst the 2008 editions of Marie Claire magazines was this book. Judging the book by its cover I assumed it would be god-awful pop fiction riding the Dan Brown bandwagon, so I of course picked it up and read it today on a return trip to Oxford.

I confess, the book isn't terrible. I'm used to suspending my sense of disbelief when reading, but I wasn't aware when I started it that Matthew Reilly books require the reader to completely disregard the physical rules of our universe, maybe if I'd been forewarned I'd have enjoyed the book more. But like I said: it wasn't terrible.

There are some issues with the book and I'll get them out of the way quickly. First, Matthew Reilly loves italics. I got the distinct impression he read his first draft and decided there just weren't enough slanty letters, so dropped italic dust all over each page, oftentimes on words that don't even need emphasis.

He also has a thing for exclamation marks. I'm honestly not used to seeing these outside of speech. If something dramatic happens in a book I assume I'll notice, I don't really need an exclamation mark to tell me.

Another punctuation mark of choice is the ellipsis. Far too many times something dramatic started happeneing…
… and then was resolved on the next line. If this were a tv series and those dots represented seven days between broadcasts then they would invoke a lot of tension, but when they involve dropping my eyes to the next line, something they have to do every dozen words anyway, all it does is irk.

The three issues above are infused in a sentence of comedic genius about half way into the book. I present my favourite sentence in Seven Ancient Wonders:

They were being attacked…
from the golf course!

A perhaps misplaced issue I had with the book is the presence of schematic diagrams of the various places visited in the text. They kind of give the impression that the author doesn't quite trust in his ability to describe the current location, or the reader's ability to imagine it.

Finally, and most anally, there's a lot of Egyptian writing mentioned in the book. At their first appearance Reilly called the symbols hieroglyphs, and I rejoiced. Then the next time he said hieroglyphics, and I died a little. He couldn't seem to figure out which one he should use so did what I used to do on French exams and used them both alternately, figuring he'd get at least half of them right. On a similarly pedantic note, at one point he describes a cross shaped room as being "cross shaped", then later describes an identically shaped room as being "†-shaped". Why?

Despite all that the book zips along at such a pace that by the time any of these things annoyed me it was already a few pages passed. It's sillier than Da Vinci Code but, as the author says in an interview at the end of the book, the book is more Indiana Jones than Robert Langdon. Which I'd guessed the nineteenth time the heroes triggered a trap that sent a massive boulder chasing them down a slope…
… and then they dived out of the way just in time! ( )
  leezeebee | Jul 6, 2020 |
I say it's SF, but that's only because I haven't bothered to add an Action/Adventure category.

For this is what it is! Yeah, robot arms and flying suits and all, but best of all, and adventure to pick up your 5000 year old Legos or Amon Ra is gonna smite you!

Say what? Is that even in this book? Well, sortof.

What we do have is a rollicking adventure that aims for the sort of pure WOW and AWE factor that is generally missing from today's literature, taking us on a tour through all the Seven Wonders of the World, or whatever is left of them, and doing it without much care in the world for little things like logic. Who needs it?

The book is BIG and Wild and Emotional and best of all, it's full of ancient traps. I'm not kidding. It almost overwhelms the page. As I read this I might as well have been watching Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom on steroids. There's even a little kid. All these burly men in the midst of gun-porn have no problems laying their lives down for her. It's odd but it resolves itself because she's mystically special.

Hell, the whole book is mystically special. :) Add heavy Dan Brown-ish conspiracy theories, wild ancient stories, the Giza Pyramid's capstone, and you'll have a wild feel like the original GI Joe cartoon when they were all on that mystical quest stuff.

Don't get me wrong. I like a good and kooky comic book feel culminating with evil Masonic Americans and evil Catholic Amon Ra worshipers in Europe. I especially love being transported into great pacing, almost non-stop action, and never-ending tests of skill, capture, and pathos. It's kinda perfect for any action movie fan. :) Just turn off the brain and flow with it.

This is the definition of popcorn fiction. And I thought that UF's had it going, lol. I swear I saw Chuck Norris in here. ( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
Remember how exciting the opening sequence of "Raiders of the Lost Ark" is? And if you thought critically about the plausibility of said sequence, things would fall apart? Well, if you can just let go of reality for a while, all of "Seven Deadly Wonders" is like the opening of "Raiders." Non-stop action; crazily imaginative booby traps; and a wonderful cast of characters make Matthew Reilly's first Jack West, Jr. book a helluva ride!

This is a wildly creative story! We learn that there are seven pieces of a capstone that, when put together and sat upon the top of the Great Pyramid at a certain time that only occurs every 4,500 years, one of two incantations can be recited: one for good, one for ill. But if neither is done, it's the end of the world. The Americans and Europeans are searching for these lost treasures as is a another group of less powerful nations. The latter of which is headed by Australian Jack West, Jr. and his mentor, Prof. Max Epper, a Canadian. So our heroes and villains run around the ancient world looking for the seven pieces, which have been secreted within the Seven Ancient Wonders.

As I stated earlier, you must suspend reality with most of Reilly's books. If you can do that, you'll have a great time reading his highly addictive novels. Oh, and one more note: I referenced characters earlier. Most of his good guys are distinctive but not all that in-depth. But ALL the bad guys are pretty generic. Consider them equivalent to Nazis. We don't have to know who they are to hate them. They're Nazis. That's enough. ( )
  Jarratt | Nov 12, 2018 |
Viser 1-5 af 53 (næste | vis alle)
ingen anmeldelser | tilføj en anmeldelse
Du bliver nødt til at logge ind for at redigere data i Almen Viden.
For mere hjælp se Almen Viden hjælpesiden.
Kanonisk titel
Originaltitel
Alternative titler
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Oprindelig udgivelsesdato
Personer/Figurer
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Vigtige steder
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Vigtige begivenheder
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Beslægtede film
Priser og hædersbevisninger
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Indskrift
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
[None]
Tilegnelse
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
For Natalie
Første ord
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
It towered like a god above the mouth of Mandraki harbour, the main port of the island state of Rhodes, much like the Statue of Liberty does today in New York.
Citater
Sidste ord
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
(Klik for at vise Advarsel: Kan indeholde afsløringer.)
Oplysning om flertydighed
Forlagets redaktører
Bagsidecitater
Originalsprog
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

Henvisninger til dette værk andre steder.

Wikipedia på engelsk (1)

Den største skattejagt nogensinde bliver en realitet, da rivaliserende lande og forskellige terrorbander i desperat kapløb forsøger at lokalisere den gamle verdens syv underværker. Hver af disse skjuler nemlig ét stykke af den gyldne sten, som i oldtiden prydede den store pyramide i Giza og tillagdes uindskrænket magt.

No library descriptions found.

Beskrivelse af bogen
Haiku-resume

Populære omslag

Quick Links

Vurdering

Gennemsnit: (3.61)
0.5 8
1 16
1.5 1
2 27
2.5 10
3 93
3.5 24
4 125
4.5 9
5 92

Er det dig?

Bliv LibraryThing-forfatter.

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Brugerbetingelser/Håndtering af brugeroplysninger | Hjælp/FAQs | Blog | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterladte biblioteker | Tidlige Anmeldere | Almen Viden | 162,211,001 bøger! | Topbjælke: Altid synlig