HjemGrupperSnakMereZeitgeist
Søg På Websted
På dette site bruger vi cookies til at levere vores ydelser, forbedre performance, til analyseformål, og (hvis brugeren ikke er logget ind) til reklamer. Ved at bruge LibraryThing anerkender du at have læst og forstået vores vilkår og betingelser inklusive vores politik for håndtering af brugeroplysninger. Din brug af dette site og dets ydelser er underlagt disse vilkår og betingelser.
Hide this

Resultater fra Google Bøger

Klik på en miniature for at gå til Google Books

You Can't Go Home Again af Thomas Wolfe
Indlæser...

You Can't Go Home Again (original 1940; udgave 1973)

af Thomas Wolfe

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
1,525238,755 (4.03)46
Now available in an all-new HarperPerennial Classics edition Thomas Wolfe's YOU CAN'T GO HOME AGAIN tells the poignant story of a successful novelist, ostracized by family and friends, who subsequently embarks on a world-wide search for his own identity and personal renewal. Perennial Classics editions include updated author biographies and a history of the book's publication.… (mere)
Medlem:KilroyWasHere
Titel:You Can't Go Home Again
Forfattere:Thomas Wolfe
Info:HarperCollins Publishers (1973), Paperback
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

Detaljer om værket

You Can't Go Home Again af Thomas Wolfe (1940)

Indlæser...

Bliv medlem af LibraryThing for at finde ud af, om du vil kunne lide denne bog.

Der er ingen diskussionstråde på Snak om denne bog.

» Se også 46 omtaler

Viser 1-5 af 23 (næste | vis alle)
"You Can’t Go Home Again" is a story of the 1930s - outdated language and extremely politically incorrect, with long-winded sentences and paragraphs, a rambling plot, and several chapters that have little significance except to add weight to this 743 page novel.

The themes include the Stock Market crash of 1929, the Depression, and pre- World War II years seen from the eyes of an American living in Germany. On a more personal level it explores the life of a struggling writer, and his journey to success as a well known respected author.

Thomas Wolfe’s claim to fame is his character development. And in order to capitalize on that talent he must create a variety of eccentric characters and exploit their anomalous physical distinctions and emotional quirks. Needless to say, there is no need for using your own imagination, Mr. Wolfe makes his characters attributes crystal clear.

And the plot? You know simply by the title that the narrator can’t go home again. And that means both physically and in a more abstract philosophical way. Not only has he burned his bridges (so to speak) amongst his home town residents, but the world is changing so quickly and so irrevocably that the familiar past life is gone - forever. The cancel culture of today will not approve of Wolfe’s philosophy. In a sentence - as an author “There can be no compromise with the truth.” If the truth hurts - so be it.

Having actually lived in Germany prior to the start of WW II, upon his return to the USA, Thomas Wolfe was outspoken about the atrocities he witnessed against the Jews. In many ways this novel is autobiographical. And interestingly, "You Can’t Go Home Again" was not published until after Thomas Wolfe’s death in 1938 - and his books were then banned in Germany.

The authenticity, themes, and observations could easily have rated this book a 5 Star and perhaps upon it’s first release it did rate that well, but by today’s standards it is a bit bloated and several whole chapters could have been eliminated to make the plot more powerful. ( )
  LadyLo | Mar 12, 2021 |
This is another thing about whether you can go home. When I was little my father disowned us from both sides of our family. Only very recently, a year or two ago did I start seeing my mother's two sisters. I've been invited to a birthday for one of them this weekend, at which I would see oodles of my mother's side of the family, really all there would be to see. Do I go? Every time I think about it, I can't help saying to myself You Can't Go Home, but maybe you can? Maybe? If you suddenly for the first time, in effect, see all these people you might have spent your life with and didn't, is that like going home? I don't know....Does it work? Or will I just feel like I should have left things just as they were.

---------------------------------------------

I’ve always known the truth of this, you can’t go home again. Yet, as I’ve spent more time in Adelaide, my home town, over the last few months than I have collectively since I first left in the mid-eighties, I’ve found it even more painful than I expected. For the first time in so many years I’ve started taking buses again and reverting to childhood, sitting at the back, like a young love is going to magically appear next to me and…

I’ve started going to the shopping centre local to my mother again and just stepping into the place makes me want to cry. I don’t want to, please don’t make me go in there, I keep saying to my mother, it’s too big, I get lost, since I can’t tell her why. It, like the buses, is a time machine that takes me right back to my teens, right back to that heady time when everybody in the world loved you and you didn’t even notice, right back to a time where, in the tree of analysis, you took a move that determined your life from that point, but you are back there again, and this time, maybe, you could take that other move and maybe…

If you want to be in the place, the very place you are right now, if that is where you want to be, then everything that came before it, even the miserable, even the fucked-up-what-on-earth-were-you-thinking-about, every bit of it has brought you here.

So, I’m thinking I should spend some months with my mother, just move back to Adelaide for some months, why not, I’m living out of a suitcase anyway and she’d have a nice time and there really isn’t a reason it should hurt me, I love going for visits, it’s just a long visit, but. Usually I don’t go on a bus there. I never step foot in the shopping centre. You can’t go home, this won’t be going home because it can’t be. I shouldn’t be scared of this, should I.
( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
This is another thing about whether you can go home. When I was little my father disowned us from both sides of our family. Only very recently, a year or two ago did I start seeing my mother's two sisters. I've been invited to a birthday for one of them this weekend, at which I would see oodles of my mother's side of the family, really all there would be to see. Do I go? Every time I think about it, I can't help saying to myself You Can't Go Home, but maybe you can? Maybe? If you suddenly for the first time, in effect, see all these people you might have spent your life with and didn't, is that like going home? I don't know....Does it work? Or will I just feel like I should have left things just as they were.

---------------------------------------------

I’ve always known the truth of this, you can’t go home again. Yet, as I’ve spent more time in Adelaide, my home town, over the last few months than I have collectively since I first left in the mid-eighties, I’ve found it even more painful than I expected. For the first time in so many years I’ve started taking buses again and reverting to childhood, sitting at the back, like a young love is going to magically appear next to me and…

I’ve started going to the shopping centre local to my mother again and just stepping into the place makes me want to cry. I don’t want to, please don’t make me go in there, I keep saying to my mother, it’s too big, I get lost, since I can’t tell her why. It, like the buses, is a time machine that takes me right back to my teens, right back to that heady time when everybody in the world loved you and you didn’t even notice, right back to a time where, in the tree of analysis, you took a move that determined your life from that point, but you are back there again, and this time, maybe, you could take that other move and maybe…

If you want to be in the place, the very place you are right now, if that is where you want to be, then everything that came before it, even the miserable, even the fucked-up-what-on-earth-were-you-thinking-about, every bit of it has brought you here.

So, I’m thinking I should spend some months with my mother, just move back to Adelaide for some months, why not, I’m living out of a suitcase anyway and she’d have a nice time and there really isn’t a reason it should hurt me, I love going for visits, it’s just a long visit, but. Usually I don’t go on a bus there. I never step foot in the shopping centre. You can’t go home, this won’t be going home because it can’t be. I shouldn’t be scared of this, should I.
( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
This is another thing about whether you can go home. When I was little my father disowned us from both sides of our family. Only very recently, a year or two ago did I start seeing my mother's two sisters. I've been invited to a birthday for one of them this weekend, at which I would see oodles of my mother's side of the family, really all there would be to see. Do I go? Every time I think about it, I can't help saying to myself You Can't Go Home, but maybe you can? Maybe? If you suddenly for the first time, in effect, see all these people you might have spent your life with and didn't, is that like going home? I don't know....Does it work? Or will I just feel like I should have left things just as they were.

---------------------------------------------

I’ve always known the truth of this, you can’t go home again. Yet, as I’ve spent more time in Adelaide, my home town, over the last few months than I have collectively since I first left in the mid-eighties, I’ve found it even more painful than I expected. For the first time in so many years I’ve started taking buses again and reverting to childhood, sitting at the back, like a young love is going to magically appear next to me and…

I’ve started going to the shopping centre local to my mother again and just stepping into the place makes me want to cry. I don’t want to, please don’t make me go in there, I keep saying to my mother, it’s too big, I get lost, since I can’t tell her why. It, like the buses, is a time machine that takes me right back to my teens, right back to that heady time when everybody in the world loved you and you didn’t even notice, right back to a time where, in the tree of analysis, you took a move that determined your life from that point, but you are back there again, and this time, maybe, you could take that other move and maybe…

If you want to be in the place, the very place you are right now, if that is where you want to be, then everything that came before it, even the miserable, even the fucked-up-what-on-earth-were-you-thinking-about, every bit of it has brought you here.

So, I’m thinking I should spend some months with my mother, just move back to Adelaide for some months, why not, I’m living out of a suitcase anyway and she’d have a nice time and there really isn’t a reason it should hurt me, I love going for visits, it’s just a long visit, but. Usually I don’t go on a bus there. I never step foot in the shopping centre. You can’t go home, this won’t be going home because it can’t be. I shouldn’t be scared of this, should I.
( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
I picture Thomas Wolfe as a precocious 15-year-old kid on the playground, carrying around a 2000-page magnum opus in his lunch pail and shoving other kids aside as he surveys vast soccer fields, and watches clumsy Philistines dangling like cherubs from the monkey bars.
Fast forward a few years, and he's found a generous and encouraging editor, he's traveled widely, dabbled in play writing, and now carts around a wheelbarrow with his unpublished masterpiece balanced like a paper pyramid, still observing the human beings in his vicinity critically and sniffing out myths and legends, legacies and crumbling empires, between the close-printed lines of newspaper articles...
Look Homeward, Angel was a very powerful book. It influenced me at the time I read it. I felt myself utterly convinced by Wolfe's skewed Romanticism. Right away, You Can't Go Home Again comes off as the same kind of novel, or possibly, another chapter from the same vast novel.
This novel encapsulates Wolfe's mind, or seems to, in all of its labyrinthine wanderings. This book is an especially good example of his eccentricities. The characters are downright caricatures, cartoonish, amusing mash-ups. George Webber, the protagonist, is no less vain or self-serving at times. He fritters away countless hours scaling the obelisks of his imagined destiny. The scenes are transparently autobiographical, or attain that effect through manipulation.
Luckily, there are many side characters, all of them charming, each exemplifying a certain downfall of forthright American monsters. Nonetheless, the texture that is woven through these absurd descriptions and even absurder soliloquies was almost painfully beautiful to me at times. I don't easily tire of Wolfe's sprawling nature.
Reading his books is like sailing a sea. You glimpse glittering treasures beneath the surface, and legions of sea monsters, but the tides carry you along and you must leave them behind.
So you see this brilliant America vanishing as you turn the pages. If you look up from the words, true life appears all of a sudden bland. There is a certain mesmerism at work in the rhythm of his words, perhaps, unlike anything else in literature. At least, you won't easily find a book so captivating, in such a plethora of ways, so angelically bound by its own laws of passion, that it sabotages your sense of proportion and glues your eyes to the page. ( )
  LSPopovich | Apr 8, 2020 |
Viser 1-5 af 23 (næste | vis alle)
ingen anmeldelser | tilføj en anmeldelse

» Tilføj andre forfattere (3 mulige)

Forfatter navnRolleHvilken slags forfatterVærk?Status
Thomas Wolfeprimær forfatteralle udgaverberegnet
Gorey, EdwardOmslagsfotograf/tegner/...medforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Hill, JamesOmslagsfotograf/tegner/...medforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet

Belongs to Publisher Series

Has the (non-series) prequel

Du bliver nødt til at logge ind for at redigere data i Almen Viden.
For mere hjælp se Almen Viden hjælpesiden.
Kanonisk titel
Originaltitel
Alternative titler
Oprindelig udgivelsesdato
Personer/Figurer
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Vigtige steder
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Vigtige begivenheder
Beslægtede film
Priser og hædersbevisninger
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Indskrift
Tilegnelse
Første ord
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
It was the hour of twilight on a soft spring day toward the end of April in the year of Our Lord 1929, and George Webber leaned his elbows on the sill of his back window and looked out at what he could see of New York.
Citater
Sidste ord
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
(Klik for at vise Advarsel: Kan indeholde afsløringer.)
Oplysning om flertydighed
Forlagets redaktører
Bagsidecitater
Originalsprog
Canonical DDC/MDS

Henvisninger til dette værk andre steder.

Wikipedia på engelsk (1)

Now available in an all-new HarperPerennial Classics edition Thomas Wolfe's YOU CAN'T GO HOME AGAIN tells the poignant story of a successful novelist, ostracized by family and friends, who subsequently embarks on a world-wide search for his own identity and personal renewal. Perennial Classics editions include updated author biographies and a history of the book's publication.

No library descriptions found.

Beskrivelse af bogen
Haiku-resume

Quick Links

Populære omslag

Vurdering

Gennemsnit: (4.03)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 9
2.5 2
3 37
3.5 5
4 62
4.5 5
5 66

Er det dig?

Bliv LibraryThing-forfatter.

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Brugerbetingelser/Håndtering af brugeroplysninger | Hjælp/FAQs | Blog | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterladte biblioteker | Tidlige Anmeldere | Almen Viden | 159,124,747 bøger! | Topbjælke: Altid synlig