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The Mystery of Edwin Drood Illustrated af…
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The Mystery of Edwin Drood Illustrated (original 1870; udgave 2021)

af Charles Dickens (Forfatter)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingSamtaler / Omtaler
2,636453,987 (3.59)1 / 247
John Jasper is haunted and restless. Unhappily settled as choirmaster in the provincial cathedral town of Cloisterham, Jasper finds himself striving for the divine in his music even as he struggles against madness brought on by ennui and opiates. Aware of his unraveling, Jasper believes his salvation may be found in the arms of Rosa, his prized pupil. His only obstacle is her fiance, Edwin Drood - Jasper's nephew.… (mere)
Medlem:BookstoogeLT
Titel:The Mystery of Edwin Drood Illustrated
Forfattere:Charles Dickens (Forfatter)
Info:(2021), 273 pages
Samlinger:Læser for øjeblikket
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Nøgleord:currently reading

Detaljer om værket

Edwin Droods Hemmelighed af Charles Dickens (1870)

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Engelsk (43)  Spansk (1)  Italiensk (1)  Alle sprog (45)
Viser 1-5 af 45 (næste | vis alle)
But Mr. Grewgious seeing nothing there, not even a light in the windows, his gaze wandered from the windows to the stars, as if he would have read in them something that was hidden from him. Many of us would, if we could; but none of us so much as know our letters in the stars yet -- or seem likely to do it, in this state of existence -- and few languages can be read until their alphabets are mastered.

Not one of my favourites, this is perhaps an unfair claim to lodge against a half-finished work. Drood, Dickens 15th novel and the last of his 24 "major" works, was to be published in 12 monthly volumes, but he sadly passed away while putting the finishing touches on instalment 6.

What we are left with is an intriguing mystery in which the core questions seem to have obvious answers, but the purpose of it all remains undefined. Edwin Drood, a seemingly attractive and nice lad, if a bit cocksure, mutually breaks off his engagement with Rosa Bud, his lovely fiancee-since-childhood, receives an ominous warning from the mistress of a local opium den, and then goes walking with a new friend from Ceylon before disappearing into the mist, never to be seen again. Amidst the murky cast of characters who inhabit the world around the intimidating Rochester Cathedral are the two orphans from Ceylon, a quick-witted reverend, an alcoholic gravekeeper, a playwriting secretary and a mysterious new arrival to town (the latter two of whom may be one and the same).

Aesthetically, the novel is a surprise turn, coming after Dickens' dense, autumnal late works like Bleak House and (especially) Our Mutual Friend. Flowers bloom, music fills the air, and Dickens' authorial voice is less controlling, allowing the characters to speak quickly and to the point. The 1860s had been a decade of turmoil for Dickens on a personal level, and one feels like he was breaking away from the heaviness that characterised his most recent novels. There's more in common, perhaps, with his Uncommercial Traveller series written across the mid-to-late '60s, in which Dickens captures moments of life in London and the countryside. At the same time, this has a major drawback in that most of the characters, including Edwin himself, lack many defining traits. Indeed, Helena and Neville - the Ceylonese orphans - are so vague that we're still not sure whether they're merely "dark" from the sun, or are in some way natives!

Much of this is intentional, of course. The late arriving figures of Tartar and Datchery were intended to be filled out later, and no doubt the same is true of Helena and Neville. The novel plays more with Reverend Crisparkle, who seems to be the Inspector Bucket of this piece, and Rosa Bud, who emerges perhaps not fully formed but at least a woman with some great level of initiative, combining the best parts of both Lizzie and Bella from Our Mutual Friend. At the heart of the piece is Edwin's uncle, John Jasper, a man deep in unrequited love and addled by his addiction to opium. Much like Edwin, though, John's character journey comes to an unwitting end and, sadly, it feels like the next instalment would've been the beginning of Dickens piecing together all of the disparate threads.

Evidence from Dickens' family, friends and letters suggests that he wasn't that concerned about the two key mysteries - who is Datchery and what happened to Edwin - being all that ... mysterious. Indeed, he wrote to one friend a suggestion that the novel might become, in its final chapters, a meditation on the evil of the murderer, rather than a surprise revelation. This is actually very fitting, when you consider one of the most tortured characters from Our Mutual Friend, who spends the second half of the novel preparing for, then covering up, a vicious crime, in chapters that are the closest - give or take Lady Dedlock - to internal character study Dickens ever came.

On the subject of endings, I thoroughly recommend Gwyneth Jones' 2012 adaptation for the BBC, of which the final 40 minutes or so comprise entirely original material. While removing Tartar (who seems intended to become the male romantic lead in Dickens' original mind), Jones follows the commonly believed (obvious?) answers to Datchery and the killer, but then throws in numerous surprises, none of which seem at all unreasonable given what came before. In fact, I daresay a few of them sound downright likely.

So, is Drood worth reading despite being unfinished? I'd probably rank it below any other Dickens novel, primarily because of its half-completed status. At the same time, once you've read it, it's fascinating to gaze into the 150 years of Drood-specific arguments that have come from academics and writers of all kinds. There's some great beauty in this novel, particularly the Cathedral which looms large as a character and which almost certainly (as Gwyneth Jones knew) would have been the setting for the book's climax, whatever that may have been. As a work, the book lacks the sublime level of symbolism that characterised Little Dorrit's creaking buildings, Bleak House's combustible crooks, or Our Mutual Friend's piles of dust. It also lacks satisfying character arcs, since everyone except for Rosa seems to be half-hidden from us, by the very nature of the piece.

Still, for Dickens completists, and those who don't mind a read that ends mid-thrust, it's not half bad. ( )
  therebelprince | Nov 15, 2020 |
Uhhh...it's not finished ( )
  Saraishelafs | Nov 4, 2020 |
Liked it, but would have been able to give a better review had it been finished. I loved the BBC film interpretation. I think they made some excellent guesses as to the direction of Dickens's thoughts. ( )
  slmr4242 | Oct 16, 2019 |
An incomplete, and final, book by Dickens. The fact that it was incomplete is a shame, really, because it had just started to pick up for me when the story abruptly ended and there was a lot of setting up, I thought, to make the plot able to flow. Nevertheless, this is not his strongest work and I felt that there was much that would have benefited from editing. Yet, as this is an incomplete work and never shown to publishers before death, I figure that you have to take the book as is.

2.5 stars- worth checking out for Dickens fans. ( )
  DanielSTJ | Aug 1, 2019 |
For the most part, I've liked the Dickens novels I've read; Bleak House is possibly the biggest exception, largely because that novel started to get bogged down about half-way through. This novel, albeit unfinished, doesn't really suffer from that problem. The pacing is good throughout, with perhaps the one exception of the sequence involving a dim London landlady that was nearly the last thing Dickens wrote. One can easily see why a few generations of readers have strained to come up with solutions for the mystery set by Dickens, since it is an intriguing one. (For my part, I believe that there has been no murder, and that Edwin Drood has vanished for his own reasons, to return later.) One of the joys of the book is the setting: Cloisterham (read: Rochester) is vividly evoked, to the point where it is easy to imagine the setting. The only character I wasn't keen on was Rosa Bud (ugh, name). Frankly, I think that Edwin Drood giving her up was a good job. A number of the other characters are a lot of fun, especially the nasty piece of work that is Honeythunder, and the gentle and good Crisparkle. Well worth a read. ( )
  EricCostello | Aug 8, 2018 |
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» Tilføj andre forfattere (40 mulige)

Forfatter navnRolleHvilken slags forfatterVærk?Status
Dickens, Charlesprimær forfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Browne, Hablot K.Illustratormedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Cardwell, MargaretRedaktørmedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Collins, CharlesIllustratormedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Fildes, LukeIllustratormedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Lehmusoksa, RistoOversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Paroissien, DavidRedaktørmedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Piffard, HaroldIllustratormedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Roberts, Sydney CastleIntroduktionmedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Thorn, DavidFortællermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Wilson, AngusIntroduktionmedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
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I am greatly indebted to Grace Hogarth whose idea this was and who gave constant encouragement; to Andre Deutsch for his patience; and most of all to Russell Hoban who, with his characteristic generosity provided me with a most shrewd and penetrating essay that was of the utmost value.
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An ancient English Cathedral Tower?
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A drowsy city, Cloisterham, whose inhabitants seem to suppose, with an inconsistency more strange than rare, that all its changes lie behind it, and that there are no more to come. A queer moral to derive from antiquity, yet older than any traceable antiquity.
"Is there anything new down in the crypt, Durdles?" asks John Jasper.

"Anything old, I think you mean," growls Durdles. "It ain't a spot for novelty."
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PLEASE NOTE: The D. Case: The Truth About The Mystery of Edwin Drood is a separate book and should not be combined with The Mystery of Edwin Drood.

The D. Case is a completion of Dickens' incomplete novel, and was collaborated on by two other writers. This is not the same as Charles Dickens' book. Although Dickens' entire text is included, the additional material is more than Dickens' contribution. Please do not combine these two works.

Do not combine with any edition which has been "completed" by another author.
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John Jasper is haunted and restless. Unhappily settled as choirmaster in the provincial cathedral town of Cloisterham, Jasper finds himself striving for the divine in his music even as he struggles against madness brought on by ennui and opiates. Aware of his unraveling, Jasper believes his salvation may be found in the arms of Rosa, his prized pupil. His only obstacle is her fiance, Edwin Drood - Jasper's nephew.

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Udgaver: 0140439269, 014119992X

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