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The Georgics

af Publius Vergilius Maro

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One of the greatest poems of the classical world, Virgil's Georgics is a glorious celebration of the eternal beauty of the natural world, now brought vividly to life in a powerful new translation. 'Georgic' means 'to work the earth', and this poetic guide to country living combines practical wisdom on tending the land with exuberant fantasy and eulogies to the rhythms of nature. It describes hills strewn with wild berries in 'vine-spread autumn'; recommends watching the stars to determine the right time to plant seeds; and gives guidance on making wine and keeping bees. Yet the Georgics also tells of angry gods, bloody battles and a natural world fraught with danger from storms, pests and plagues. Expansive in its scope, lush in its language, this extraordinary work is at once a reflection on the cycles of life, death and rebirth, an argument for the nobility of labour and an impassioned reflection on the Roman Empire of Virgil's times. Kimberly Johnson's lyrical verse translation captures all the rich beauty and abundant imagery of the original, re-creating this ancient masterpiece for our times.… (mere)

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» Se også 39 omtaler

Engelsk (8)  Fransk (1)  Svensk (1)  Hollandsk (1)  Alle sprog (11)
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It's a good, solid translation, in accessible English. Book 4 in particular is very Virgilian in style; he really hits his stride in the epic-mythic stuff. The first three books just didn't sound like him at all, and I don't think it's an issue of the translator. Clearly he was still a young poet and polishing his style. Still, a good read. ( )
  mrsmarch | Nov 28, 2018 |
Vergiliuksen "Georgica" on kokoelma paimenlyriikkaa, joka on myös palvellut ikään kuin opetusrunoudellisia tarkoitusperiä. Teos sisältää Teivas Oksalan kattavan esipuheen ja Päivö Oksalan postuumin heksametrisuomennoksen neljännestä kirjasta. (K.L.)
Publius Vergilius Maro (70-19 e.a.a) kirjoitti kolme varsinaista pääteosta. Bucolica oli perinteinen paimenrunoelma, Georgica maanviljelyksen ylistys, ja viimeistelemättömäksi jäänyt Aenis Rooman suvun kantaisän tarina. Vergilius syntyi Andesissa Mantuan (Mantova) luona maalaisperheeseen ja hänestä piti tulla asianajaja ja poliitikko. Hän oli kuitenkin arka ja unelmointiin taipuva luonne, joka viihtyi parhaiten maalla. Taloudellisesti riippumaton tilanne mahdollisti joutenolon ja runoilemisen. Hänen koko toimintansa nivoutuu Caesarin murhan ja Rooman kansalaissodan pyörteisiin ja jälkimaininkeihin. Kaikessa Vergilius oli Octavianuksen, tuon jouluevankeliumin keisari Augustuksen mies.
Kristitty maailma ja kirkko on noteerannut hänen tuotantonsa poikkeuksellisen korkealle sen korkean moraalisen sisällön ja joidenkin profeetallisena pidettyjen säkeiden vuoksi. Laatiessaan suurta runoelmaansa La Divina Comedia eli Jumalainen näytelmä kelpasi Vergilius Dante Alighierille turvalliseksi matkaoppaaksi. Kukapa ei suosisi kotimaakuntansa poikaa. Dantelle Varsinais-Italian poika Vergilius oli kaikki kaikessa. Hänen sanansa Jumalaisen näytelmän toisessa laulussa ovatkin kuvaavat: ”Mun mestarini oot, mun tekijäni: sinulta yksin oppinut ma olen sen tyylin kauniin, jok’ on kunniani.” (indy romanus, blogger)
  Asko_Tolonen | Jun 5, 2018 |
71. The Georgics by Virgil
composed: 29 bce
format: 92 page Kindle public domain e-book (translator unknown)
acquired: from amazon in November
read: Nov 27 - Dec 3
rating: ??

This was much easier on me than the Eclogues. I could follow at the sentence level, and could follow the general themes, and, occasionally, get the references. And there is a nice story at the end on Aristaeus (a god I had never heard of), that includes a wonderful take on Orpheus and Eurydice, and that somehow made the whole book better. But, on the other hand, reading without notes (and reading a public domain translation without even knowing the translator), I was constantly lost. Names and nicknames and place names all passed me by, and somewhat odd English didn't help. Sometimes I would read a sentence several times until concluding that I just didn't understand enough of the words to make any sense of it.

About halfway through this I was able to get a translation by [[L. P. Wilkinson]] from my library. So the first half I read very slowly, struggling the whole way...and still mostly missing whatever points there were. The second half I steamed through, thinking I'll just re-read through Wilkinson. Oddly, that worked better for me...or maybe I just really liked Orpheus.

I'm finding this difficult to review without thinking on the introduction by [[L. P. Wilkinson]] in his translation, which I read after I read this.... in brief Virgil was doing a lot of things here, but mainly he is playing off [[Hesiod]]'s [Works and Days], and heavily under the influence of [[Lucretius]]'s epicurean manifesto - [The Nature of Things] (which I haven't read). The four books of poems form a romantic notion of farm life. Noxious things, like absentee landlords and slaves, aren't mentioned. This is about an idealized farmer running his own farm, and it's very much a celebration of this kind of life. Each book covers a topic - Book 1 farms and fields, Book 2 trees, Book 3 livestock (first large, then smaller), and Book 4 beekeeping. From Hesiod is the idea of giving advice directly to a person on farm management and from Hesiod, somewhat, is the method of how Virgil presents it. Book 1 takes heavily from Hesiod. From Lucretius is a love of extensive details and description - and this is where Virgil excels. The Georgics is considered the first descriptive poem.

It's not, however, a very good farm manual. One might kindly call it a simplification as it lacks critical detail, while giving some ridiculously fanciful advice. Virgil likely grew up on a farm, but he didn't go out and study farming, he studied literature. And it seems almost all his ideas come from the literary pool, as he references freely. That seems to be an important point. But the sense within the descriptions and the charm of them seems to be mostly Virgil's own, and maybe reflects his own experiences.

I read this while thinking about how Virgil might have related to his childhood farms and how, in the Eclogues, he openly mourned the farmers who lost their land. That is, after different stages in the various Roman civil wars, farmers were evicted from their land, and it was handed over veterans in reward for their service. This happened in the exact area, near modern Mantua, where Virgil was from. I like to think that Virgil saw these new comers coming in and taking over land they didn't know and thinking how they must be trying to figure out how to work this land. Could he, perhaps, have thought to give them a book of facetious and obvious advice, sometimes ridiculous, to sort of mock their ignorance of their poorly acquired land? Just my own silly idea....probably better left unsaid.

2016
public domain e-book (translator unknown) https://www.librarything.com/topic/226898#5822200
L. P. Wilkinson translation: https://www.librarything.com/topic/226898#5841962
  dchaikin | Dec 4, 2016 |
I knew going in that this wasn't going to be action packed, like, say, The Aeneid, and it isn't. Actually, that's not quite true. In some places there is plenty of action – where the plague is setting in and everything is dying, where the cattle and horses are going mad with desire (not for each other, thankfully), where the young bull is being pulverized so that he will spontaneously combust into a swarm of bees, where Orpheus is very nearly rescuing Eurydice from Hades... there is really quite a lot of drama here. The drama is broken up, though, by sections in which we are milking goats, arranging shrubberies for bees, and grafting fruit trees. Disease, muck, and war alternate with idyllic stretches of lambs frolicking, bees buzzing among the flowers, and happy farmers resting under shady trees. I picked this up looking for more of the beautiful nature imagery I loved in the Aeneid, and I definitely found that, but the back and forth, between farming lessons, country-living fantasies, myths, and death & destruction kept things interesting. The different sections did not hold together particularly well for me, but I only read this once, with no explanatory material aside from the introduction, and I expect I'd have gotten more out of it if I'd put more in.

There were a few places where I found Fallon's modern colloquialisms and word choices jarring, but mostly the poetry was really lovely. Since I'm not competent to read Latin poetry, I've no idea how this is as a translation, but I do plan to keep an eye out for a different version – Fitzgerald's Aeneid had a more formal feel to it, and this felt a little to “folksy” to me, but maybe the two poems are just very different beasts. The language is very readable, anyway, and the footnotes are good (though I wish they'd been put at the foot of the pages). ( )
1 stem meandmybooks | Aug 6, 2014 |
This was the hardest book to read. I don't know why it was worse than any of the other classics, but it about killed me. Even illustrating the margins didn't help. Good luck ( )
1 stem Snukes | Jun 14, 2013 |
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Virgil's "poem of the land" has shaped the way that English poets write about nature and the countryside since the Renaissance.
 

» Tilføj andre forfattere (67 mulige)

Forfatter navnRolleHvilken slags forfatterVærk?Status
Vergilius Maro, PubliusForfatterprimær forfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Albini, GiuseppeOversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Delille, JacquesOversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Fallon, PeterOversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Ferry, DavidOversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Gerhardt, IdaOversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Janssen, JacquesDesignermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Lewis, C. DayOversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Richelmy, AgostinoRedaktørmedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Vondel, J. van denOversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Wilkinson, L. P.Oversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
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Oprindelig udgivelsesdato
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Vigtige steder
Vigtige begivenheder
Beslægtede film
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What makes the cornfield smile; beneath what star Maecenas, it is meet to turn the sod; Or marry elm with vine; how tend the steer; What pains for cattle-keeping, or what proof; Of patient trial serves for thrifty bees;- Such are my themes.
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This is Virgil’s Georgics in translation only. Do not combine with editions containing a Latin text.
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One of the greatest poems of the classical world, Virgil's Georgics is a glorious celebration of the eternal beauty of the natural world, now brought vividly to life in a powerful new translation. 'Georgic' means 'to work the earth', and this poetic guide to country living combines practical wisdom on tending the land with exuberant fantasy and eulogies to the rhythms of nature. It describes hills strewn with wild berries in 'vine-spread autumn'; recommends watching the stars to determine the right time to plant seeds; and gives guidance on making wine and keeping bees. Yet the Georgics also tells of angry gods, bloody battles and a natural world fraught with danger from storms, pests and plagues. Expansive in its scope, lush in its language, this extraordinary work is at once a reflection on the cycles of life, death and rebirth, an argument for the nobility of labour and an impassioned reflection on the Roman Empire of Virgil's times. Kimberly Johnson's lyrical verse translation captures all the rich beauty and abundant imagery of the original, re-creating this ancient masterpiece for our times.

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