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How to Know a Person: The Art of Seeing…
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How to Know a Person: The Art of Seeing Others Deeply and Being Deeply Seen (udgave 2023)

af David Brooks (Forfatter)

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311784,710 (4.05)2
Philosophy. Self-Improvement. Sociology. Nonfiction. HTML:NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A practical, heartfelt guide to the art of truly knowing another person in order to foster deeper connections at home, at work, and throughout our livesfrom the author of The Road to Character and The Second Mountain
As David Brooks observes, There is one skill that lies at the heart of any healthy person, family, school, community organization, or society: the ability to see someone else deeply and make them feel seento accurately know another person, to let them feel valued, heard, and understood.
And yet we humans dont do this well. All around us are people who feel invisible, unseen, misunderstood. In How to Know a Person, Brooks sets out to help us do better, posing questions that are essential for all of us: If you want to know a person, what kind of attention should you cast on them? What kind of conversations should you have? What parts of a persons story should you pay attention to?
Driven by his trademark sense of curiosity and his determination to grow as a person, Brooks draws from the fields of psychology and neuroscience and from the worlds of theater, philosophy, history, and education to present a welcoming, hopeful, integrated approach to human connection. How to Know a Person helps readers become more understanding and considerate toward others, and to find the joy that comes from being seen. Along the way it offers a possible remedy for a society that is riven by fragmentation, hostility, and misperception.
The act of seeing another person, Brooks argues, is profoundly creative: How can we look somebody in the eye and see something large in them, and in turn, see something larger in ourselves? How to Know a Person is for anyone searching for connection, and yearning to be understood.
… (mere)
Medlem:wilkinsonmr
Titel:How to Know a Person: The Art of Seeing Others Deeply and Being Deeply Seen
Forfattere:David Brooks (Forfatter)
Info:Random House (2023), 320 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
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How to Know a Person: The Art of Seeing Others Deeply and Being Deeply Seen af David Brooks

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I read Bobos in Paradise years back when it first came out. This is better; or rather, it starts out similarly and a little detachedly, but improved as it went - especially as it got personal.

Brooks is a good writer and an astute observer. Everyone sees the world through their specific lens. Brooks sees the world through affluent, well-heeled eyes--this is what he knows, what he lives, and the social circles through which he travels. That's an observation, not a faulting. Sometimes it shows up in his writing - like when he makes a point about how a plumber has to be super-careful to be taken as credible among an educated, academic crowd. That's likely true from the POV of an educated, academic, coastal-dwelling, Ivy-leagueish type of crowd. But the plumber? If he's mixing with that crowd at all, he's not looking to impress them and he doesn't care what they think of him--he knows plenty about life and people that many elitists don't and never will.

This book is really a gentle way to tell elitists to get out of their ivory towers, burst the bubbles they live in, or step out from behind their screen and mix it up with real people. That there's joy in understanding and seeing a person - not an identify, not a stereotype, not a political party, but the complex, nuanced, and wonder-full person right in front of them. In my experience, many don't want to, some don't know how to, and Brooks points out what they're missing. Also, he offers advice on ways to do it.

The chapter where Brooks' writing got personal is when he tells about his childhood, lifelong friend who succumbed to suicide. That got real and vulnerable and was Brooks at his best.

Recommended primarily to those who denigrate people who think differently, hold fewer degrees, or work 'dirty' jobs, as somehow less than and/or those who've ever used the phrase "flyover country" unironically. ( )
  angiestahl | May 12, 2024 |
Summary: An exploration of how we might see people deeply and help them know that they are seen.

Most of us would want to be known as people who help people feel seen and to be deeply seen ourselves. But in our most honest moments, we have to admit we are not very good at this. We don’t listen well. We are far more capable of trying to impress others with our stories, our wit, our accomplishments. One of the most winsome aspects of this book is David Brooks candid admission that this characterizes his relationships far too often, even during his journey to explore this subject.

With his trademark clarity mixing research and personal narrative, Brooks describes the nature of good relationships, where people are seen by each other. He organizes this inquiry into three parts. The first of these is “I See You.” He speaks of how important and how lacking this is. He writes about the ways we often size up and diminish others. By contrast, he describes the qualities of an Illuminator, a model he will hold up and develop throughout the book: tender, receptive, actively curious, affectionate, generous, and holistic, seeing the whole person. Such people also are skilled in the practice of accompaniment, a relaxed awareness of the other as we share life with them. He discusses the marks of good conversations, where we loop back, actively listening, and avoid being the “topper.” He distinguishes between unhelpful questions where we stay superficial and the questions that take us deeper, that invite people to share something more of themselves.

The second part of the book goes deeper in seeing others in their struggles. One of the most powerful chapters in this section concerns how you serve someone in despair, and Brooks narrates his efforts to do this with a friend who eventually ended his life. He writes about what it means to empathize, describing it as mirroring, mentalizing, and caring. He speaks of how Illuminators are both aware of how they’ve been shaped by suffering and allow others who are suffering to process this question.

The final part of the book explores what it means to see people in their strengths. He summarizes personality with “the Big Five” ((he’s not much of a Myers-Briggs fan): extroversion, conscientiousness, neuroticism, agreeableness, and openness. He has a chapter on life tasks, reminding us that people are in a lifelong process of growth and that knowing someone involves discerning where in that process they are. He explores how we listen to and understand life stories and watch for how ancestors show up. He concludes with asking about the nature of wisdom and how it is acquired over a life, and how that changes our relationships.

In a time where we are so divided, where depression and anxiety are skyrocketing and our Surgeon General has named loneliness as a public health crisis, David Brooks has written a book that represents both a way to address many of these concerns and that appeals to “the better angels of our nature.” He writes as a fellow-learner on the journey, not as an authority. He speaks to one of the basics of life that often is overshadowed by the glitzy and the glamourous. He reminds us of the qualities of a good friend. He encourages me to want to be one. ( )
  BobonBooks | Apr 23, 2024 |
Brooks is an excellent popularizer of social psych and social wisdom. Not a lit review, but a survey of the ways we can know others and the ways we avoid knowing and being known. Richly elaborated with examples from friends, from his reading, and from his own life. A very thoughtful book that is offered as an antidote for our alienated and polarized age. ( )
  brianstagner | Feb 28, 2024 |
The first two-thirds were a bit dull. Read like a smart person's "How to Win Friends" book, but with updated data, anecdotes, and references. However, I found the last third incredibly valuable and useful in his discussion of personality types. After dismissing Meyers-Briggs as fun but frivolous, he launches into a powerful explanation of how important it is that the world is made up of various personality types. But he also makes a beautiful and empathetic case for valuing each type of personality fully--with all its strengths and flaws. It's a clear and attainable approach to practicing real empathy. It's an idea that I'll be chewing on for quite some time. I highly recommend this book! ( )
  trauman | Feb 6, 2024 |
I chose this book because I admire David Brooks more than just about any other political writer/commentator of our time. And that might be a bit unusual since he is considered a “conservative pundit.” At least he used to be considered that. I am probably on the opposite side of that political continuum. These days most people see Brooks as a middle of the road commentator more than a partisan one. That’s because he is so wise. This book ostensibly attempts to teach its reader to learn to be better at getting to know our fellow man and woman in ways most of us never really thought about. It is very prescriptive with a plethora of anecdotes and references. The notes section is excellent with easy hyper links back to the text they refer to in the book. All of that said, as a 73-year-old retiree, I almost wish Brooks had made this a 20-minute TED talk rather than a full blown book. Perhaps if I were still working and were 30 years younger, I would feel differently. I guess maybe I see myself as being beyond hope of long term improvement of my people skills. I could see Brooks’ book being used in social science class at the college level, and maybe it is. I think in that context it would be valuable. Anytime I see David Brooks’ name as a guest anywhere, I sit up and pay attention. That is just how important what he has to say is. David Brooks is something of a national treasure. ( )
  FormerEnglishTeacher | Jan 8, 2024 |
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Philosophy. Self-Improvement. Sociology. Nonfiction. HTML:NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A practical, heartfelt guide to the art of truly knowing another person in order to foster deeper connections at home, at work, and throughout our livesfrom the author of The Road to Character and The Second Mountain
As David Brooks observes, There is one skill that lies at the heart of any healthy person, family, school, community organization, or society: the ability to see someone else deeply and make them feel seento accurately know another person, to let them feel valued, heard, and understood.
And yet we humans dont do this well. All around us are people who feel invisible, unseen, misunderstood. In How to Know a Person, Brooks sets out to help us do better, posing questions that are essential for all of us: If you want to know a person, what kind of attention should you cast on them? What kind of conversations should you have? What parts of a persons story should you pay attention to?
Driven by his trademark sense of curiosity and his determination to grow as a person, Brooks draws from the fields of psychology and neuroscience and from the worlds of theater, philosophy, history, and education to present a welcoming, hopeful, integrated approach to human connection. How to Know a Person helps readers become more understanding and considerate toward others, and to find the joy that comes from being seen. Along the way it offers a possible remedy for a society that is riven by fragmentation, hostility, and misperception.
The act of seeing another person, Brooks argues, is profoundly creative: How can we look somebody in the eye and see something large in them, and in turn, see something larger in ourselves? How to Know a Person is for anyone searching for connection, and yearning to be understood.

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