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La Maravilla af Alfredo Véa
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La Maravilla (udgave 1994)

af Alfredo Véa (Forfatter)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
1064199,805 (4.03)2
"Buckeye Road wasn't much of a town, just a place where a pocked and pitted road met an invisible street....It was less that unincorporated, it was unknown..." Yet it is here in the desert outside the Phoenix city limits that Alfredo Vea, Jr., finds a world of marvels spilling out of the adobe homes, tar-paper shacks, rusted Cadillacs, and battered trailers that are otherwise known as "Buckeye." Three thousand years of history and the myths of many cultures, as well as the fates of a dozen unforgettable characters, will all collide one hot summer in 1958; and the events played out on Buckeye Road will amount to nothing less than a new and life-affirming vision of the American Southwest...and of America itself. The vivid symbol of Buckeye Road is La Maravilla--the blanket of marigolds laid upon graves in Mexican cemeteries, and the mythical dog, sacred to the Aztecs, who returns from the under-world to lead his master to Mictlan, the land of the dead. La Maravilla is the embodiment of belonging to two worlds, and of being torn between the love and fear of both. It is the condition and mystery borne by all who inhabit this American outback--whether they are Blacks, Chicanos, Asians, Native Americans, Mexicans, European immigrants, or Anglo misfits. For Beto, the young boy at the center of this magnificent story, it is the dilemma that he must somehow resolve and emerge from whole. For Beto has no parents to guide him--his mother has fled the "old ways" of her Mexican family for a bright new American life beyond the desert sunset in California, where "Indians are history and Sunday is for football, not church!" But in her place, and more than filling it, is Beto's aristocratic Spanish grandmother, a Catholic curandera with a passion for the music of Duke Ellington. He also has his grandfather, a Yaqui Indian whose spirit soars above a desert without frontiers. With this extraordinary first novel, Alfredo Vea, Jr., takes his place in the first rank of America… (mere)
Medlem:QuixoticBooks
Titel:La Maravilla
Forfattere:Alfredo Véa (Forfatter)
Info:Plume (1994), Edition: Reprint, 320 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:$20.00, Used - Remainder

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La maravilla af Alfredo Vea

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Véa overwrites, but in such an exuberant way that you don't mind it. La Maravilla isn't plot driven. It centers on a young boy, Alberto, who lives with his grandparents on Buckeye Road, a desert village outside of Phoenix that is home to society's dregs. Beto's grandparents teach him about the natural world, compassion, religion, and indigenous values, and Véa peppers the book with his inimitable digressions about physics, history, race, and language. It's easy to see how Beto's character leads directly to Jesse Pasadoble, the protagonist of Véa's later novel, Gods Go Begging. ( )
  jalbacutler | Jan 10, 2017 |
2010 ( )
  mjshuster | Aug 11, 2010 |
This novel never fails to leave me in an entirely other world once the last page is read. The strength of the relationships between Josefina and everyone around her, her grandson not least, is very definitely the backbone of this work. It is fleshed out in the stories of the people who populate this world, the human slag heap outside of Phoenix, Arizona in the 1950's. There are small enclaves of people from almost everywhere, and their interactions, or lack thereof, inform the life of the small boy through whose actions and eyes this story is mostly told.
I first read this novel for a Chicano Literature class and have re-read it with chilled spine and trembling hands once a year since then. It is a tremendous work that serves to reconnect me with the bones and sinews of truly wonderful storycraft. ( )
  WaxPoetic | May 29, 2009 |
magical, including the relationship between the boy and his grandfather and grandmother. The people who surround him are bizarre in just the right ways too. ( )
  BCCJillster | Jul 9, 2006 |
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"Buckeye Road wasn't much of a town, just a place where a pocked and pitted road met an invisible street....It was less that unincorporated, it was unknown..." Yet it is here in the desert outside the Phoenix city limits that Alfredo Vea, Jr., finds a world of marvels spilling out of the adobe homes, tar-paper shacks, rusted Cadillacs, and battered trailers that are otherwise known as "Buckeye." Three thousand years of history and the myths of many cultures, as well as the fates of a dozen unforgettable characters, will all collide one hot summer in 1958; and the events played out on Buckeye Road will amount to nothing less than a new and life-affirming vision of the American Southwest...and of America itself. The vivid symbol of Buckeye Road is La Maravilla--the blanket of marigolds laid upon graves in Mexican cemeteries, and the mythical dog, sacred to the Aztecs, who returns from the under-world to lead his master to Mictlan, the land of the dead. La Maravilla is the embodiment of belonging to two worlds, and of being torn between the love and fear of both. It is the condition and mystery borne by all who inhabit this American outback--whether they are Blacks, Chicanos, Asians, Native Americans, Mexicans, European immigrants, or Anglo misfits. For Beto, the young boy at the center of this magnificent story, it is the dilemma that he must somehow resolve and emerge from whole. For Beto has no parents to guide him--his mother has fled the "old ways" of her Mexican family for a bright new American life beyond the desert sunset in California, where "Indians are history and Sunday is for football, not church!" But in her place, and more than filling it, is Beto's aristocratic Spanish grandmother, a Catholic curandera with a passion for the music of Duke Ellington. He also has his grandfather, a Yaqui Indian whose spirit soars above a desert without frontiers. With this extraordinary first novel, Alfredo Vea, Jr., takes his place in the first rank of America

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