HjemGrupperSnakMereZeitgeist
Søg På Websted
På dette site bruger vi cookies til at levere vores ydelser, forbedre performance, til analyseformål, og (hvis brugeren ikke er logget ind) til reklamer. Ved at bruge LibraryThing anerkender du at have læst og forstået vores vilkår og betingelser inklusive vores politik for håndtering af brugeroplysninger. Din brug af dette site og dets ydelser er underlagt disse vilkår og betingelser.

Resultater fra Google Bøger

Klik på en miniature for at gå til Google Books

Indlæser...

The Deluge

af Stephen Markley

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
20910127,720 (3.94)2
"This book is, simply put, a modern classic. If you read it, you'll never forget it. Prophetic, terrifying, uplifting." --Stephen King From the bestselling author of Ohio, a masterful American epic charting a near future approaching collapse and a nascent but strengthening solidarity. In the first decades of the 21st century, the world is convulsing, its governments mired in gridlock while a patient but unrelenting ecological crisis looms. America is in upheaval, battered by violent weather and extreme politics. In California in 2013, Tony Pietrus, a scientist studying deposits of undersea methane, receives a death threat. His fate will become bound to a stunning cast of characters--a broken drug addict, a star advertising strategist, a neurodivergent mathematician, a cunning eco-terrorist, an actor turned religious zealot, and a brazen young activist named Kate Morris, who, in the mountains of Wyoming, begins a project that will alter the course of the decades to come. From the Gulf Coast to Los Angeles, the Midwest to Washington, DC, their intertwined odysseys unfold against a stark backdrop of accelerating chaos as they summon courage, galvanize a nation, fall to their own fear, and find wild hope in the face of staggering odds. As their stories hurtle toward a spectacular climax, each faces a reckoning: what will they sacrifice to salvage humanity's last chance at a future? A singular achievement, The Deluge is a once-in-a-generation novel that meets the moment as few works of art ever have.… (mere)
Indlæser...

Bliv medlem af LibraryThing for at finde ud af, om du vil kunne lide denne bog.

Der er ingen diskussionstråde på Snak om denne bog.

» Se også 2 omtaler

Engelsk (8)  Hollandsk (1)  Alle sprog (9)
Viser 1-5 af 9 (næste | vis alle)
Stephen Markley had high ambitions for his book: “emotionally reorient the reader around what’s happening, so we can actually feel in our hearts what the stakes of this moment actually are.”

This moment refers to the ongoing predicament of our biosphere: The Deluge is climate fiction.

As with any book, it won’t work for everyone. Especially if you don’t believe rapidly reducing our carbon emissions is necessary, or if you feel the current American political & economical system generates enough equity, The Deluge might annoy you for ideological reasons. Markley does try to be balanced – more on that below – but it’s no denying this book advocates progressive measures rather than conservative ones. It’s impossible to write books that appeal to everybody on the political spectrum, and this book won’t convince anyone who doesn’t already think society is in peril because of human emissions. But for those who do, it will put the urgency in much, much sharper focus.

So, for me, Markley did achieve his goals: the novel gave me new insights, and it affected me emotionally. I cried numerous times while reading it, and it put a knot in my stomach – tight and then even tighter.

The Deluge is set in the US, and its 880 pages chronicle 2013 to 2040. It is a big, big book of the sprawling kind, told through the eyes of seven characters – a scientist, a poor drug addict, an ecoterrorist, a Washington policy adviser, an advertising strategist, a high profile activist and her partner.

These characters all have families and friends, and it is trough their well-drawn relations Markley managed to evoke strong emotions in me, as the cast experience climate catastrophes and political upheaval primarily while they are connected to other human beings. In a sense, this book is as much about love and friendship as it is about ecological systems and politics: we fear for what’s coming, because we fear for our loved ones.

The Deluge is immersive, cinematic reading. Stephen King called it the best book he read in 2022 and “a modern classic (…) Prophetic, terrifying, uplifting.” I concur. At times I felt 14 again, utterly absorbed by The Stand. Markley wrote that kind of book – with the occasional boardroom debate thrown in. It’s arguably better, as The Stand had no real-world stakes.

The novel was 13 years in the making, and so Markley had to constantly revise and change stuff he’d already written to suit new political and scientific developments. It makes it an exceptionally timely book: to really experience what Markley pulled off, you need to read this now – not in 10 years.

So what exactly does he achieve in The Deluge – aside from showing, on a basic level, what could happen the coming decades: drought, fire, flood, food scarcity, inflation, migration & death?

(...)

Full review on Weighing A Pig Doesn't Fatten It ( )
  bormgans | Jan 7, 2024 |
DNF; abandoned at page 168. It was a slog, with too many characters, POV shifts and too much exposition. Get to the point. It’s been compared to The Stand. At least King gave us characters we wanted to spend time with alongside one hell of a road trip. The Deluge is a deluge of words; it needs to be severely trimmed down. ( )
  EZLivin | Jul 4, 2023 |
This book is a lot. It extrapolates every bad thing in the US today to an existential crisis 10 years from now. Worst case scenario. With that said, any one of these crises are plausible. It seems like some of the impact of the book is dampened by the length of the saga. Worth the read if you have the courage and the stamina. Might make a great epic movie or series. ( )
  ghefferon | Apr 29, 2023 |
Every activist should read this book no matter what their chosen cause is, but especially climate change. ( )
  cmnorman | Mar 16, 2023 |
Tonight I finished The Deluge, the second novel of Stephen Markley, one that I had been waiting eagerly for since I was so blown away by his first novel Ohio.

The Deluge is a brick of a book but I kept turning those 900 pages and I was once again in awe of Markley’s writing. This one has a large, sprawling plot with lots of diverse and inclusive characters: female, male, black, white, gay, straight, non-binary. I loved the way Markley just brings them on the stage without talking about their coming out, endured racism or anti feminism. They just are there and they are naturally who they are.

This is a story with a message, and one of the utmost importance and urgency: climate change and what it can do to us.
Markley shows us how society can unravel within a decade from now due to the changing climate itself and the way people react to it. They do here, in both violent and nonviolent ways. It is a warning and I’m going to say something I never did before but here goes: you should read this book. To get shaken up and realize what’s happening to our world.

The Deluge is a highly political and activist novel and Markley uses his talent as a novelist to step into the discussion and he does so in a loud and urgent way, which is I believe the only way that works. The New York Times wrote about him: “novelists often preen as moralists, but he’s the genuine article.”

The style Markley uses is very interesting. Chapters are now and then written as newspaper or magazine articles, notes appear in boxes within the text. He excels though when he writes about his characters. There I see his compassion for them and also the magnificence of Markley as a novelist, just like in Ohio. I have the feeling that he will turn into one of the important writers of our time.

Read this book!
  leoslittlebooklife | Jan 30, 2023 |
Viser 1-5 af 9 (næste | vis alle)
“The Deluge” is long on ambition. It’s also long, weighing in at nearly 900 pages — baggy, restless, immersive. Centrifugal forces threaten to tear it apart, but Markley soldiers on, in hyper-real mode. A kind of metanovel floats just above the surface of “The Deluge,” satire that reads like a darker, dissonant riff on Joe Klein’s “Primary Colors,” unfolding in collages of tabloid headlines, Vanity Fair profiles and opinion pieces by the likes of Al Gore, interspersed among the chapters. The author’s just as fascinated with the sausage-making of legislation as with greenhouse gases.... Markley’s eye is on the near future, but he’s also preoccupied with the near past, relitigating recent traumas: a Washington in lockdown, N.Y.P.D. teams fanning across Lower Manhattan and a Trump 2.0 who makes the original look like a stroll in the park. The Covid pandemic seems “long ago.” This is fiction on an impossibly grand scale. We struggle to wrap our arms around it.... Markley’s right to peer forward, though: defiant, Cassandra-like, screaming into the void. Novelists often preen as moralists, but he’s the genuine article. As humanity hurtles needlessly toward catastrophe, the powerful make and break the rules, dodging accountability and sucking up resources. Meanwhile, it’s getting hot in here, and there, and everywhere.
tilføjet af Lemeritus | RedigerNew York Times, Hamilton Cain (pay site) (Jan 10, 2023)
 
Stephen Markley’s new climate-change epic, “The Deluge,” is a lot. A lot of characters, a lot of politicking and a lot of devastation, filling a lot of pages. But a lot of it is entertaining, and its length is purposeful: A realistic projection of the collapse of civilization as we know it takes some easing into. As one character puts it: “One must be careful in the handling of difficult realities. People cannot hear bad news all at once.” ... For all its well-researched details about methane hydrates and carbon sequestration, and all the weather calamities it depicts, “The Deluge” isn’t just concerned with climate change. Another major theme is something else it posits as an immediate risk: identity politics, which in this novel leads to divisive, distracting tribalism, exacerbates white supremacism and shifts our focus away from the radical change required to fix our most existential problems. That’s an extremely debatable point, but you can see why Markley includes it. He’s tried to write a big, unifying novel that has something for everyone — fans of horror, thrillers, science fiction, literary fiction and more. So it’s only natural that he’d play to both sides of the political aisle. He’d make room for hobbits and wizards if he realistically could. This novel might try to do the impossible; but as with the climate, so with novels: Why not try?
tilføjet af Lemeritus | RedigerWashington Post, Mark Athitakis (pay site) (Jan 6, 2023)
 
Ahyper-realistic, alarming vision of the world destabilized by climate change. This sprawling novel, about 900 pages long, covers three decades of American life, beginning in 2013, as partisan divisions widen and the effects of rising global temperatures become more pronounced, and extending to a cataclysmic near future marked by social and ecological collapse.... This is an exhaustively researched book, crammed full of commentary and speculation on contemporary trends: widening wealth gaps, political polarization, the inefficacy of reformist measures to address environmental threats, the blinkered resistance of conservative forces, the inevitability of violent assaults on scapegoats as currents of irrationality pulse through the nation. There are intriguing surprises in this chronicle of accelerating disorder and anomie, and the conclusion rewards those who persevere through the thickets of character development, though overall the novel has difficulty sustaining narrative momentum, and its extraordinary length seems, at last, rather unjustified.... This is an exhaustively researched book, crammed full of commentary and speculation on contemporary trends: widening wealth gaps, political polarization, the inefficacy of reformist measures to address environmental threats, the blinkered resistance of conservative forces, the inevitability of violent assaults on scapegoats as currents of irrationality pulse through the nation. There are intriguing surprises in this chronicle of accelerating disorder and anomie, and the conclusion rewards those who persevere through the thickets of character development, though overall the novel has difficulty sustaining narrative momentum, and its extraordinary length seems, at last, rather unjustified.
tilføjet af Lemeritus | RedigerKirkus Review (Nov 15, 2022)
 
In this brilliant dystopian epic from Markley (Ohio), spanning from 2013 to 2040, a range of characters attempt to avert catastrophic climate change, sometimes at great personal risk, and with varying degrees of success....Markley makes this anything but didactic; his nuanced characterizations of individuals with different approaches to the existential threat make the perils they encounter feel real as they navigate cover-ups and lies. It’s a disturbing tour de force.
tilføjet af Lemeritus | RedigerPublisher's Weekly (Sep 13, 2022)
 
Du bliver nødt til at logge ind for at redigere data i Almen Viden.
For mere hjælp se Almen Viden hjælpesiden.
Kanonisk titel
Originaltitel
Alternative titler
Oprindelig udgivelsesdato
Personer/Figurer
Vigtige steder
Vigtige begivenheder
Beslægtede film
Indskrift
Tilegnelse
Første ord
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
One of the grad assistants has left the mail in a pile by the lab's primary computer. The first envelope Tony Pietrus opened was a confirmation letter from the American Geophysical Union for an appearance at the annual AGU to present initial research findings. The second envelope would change the way Tony felt about the world. He never got around to the rest of the day's mail. -The Phase Transitions of Methane Hydrates, 2013
Citater
Sidste ord
Oplysning om flertydighed
Forlagets redaktører
Bagsidecitater
Originalsprog
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

Henvisninger til dette værk andre steder.

Wikipedia på engelsk

Ingen

"This book is, simply put, a modern classic. If you read it, you'll never forget it. Prophetic, terrifying, uplifting." --Stephen King From the bestselling author of Ohio, a masterful American epic charting a near future approaching collapse and a nascent but strengthening solidarity. In the first decades of the 21st century, the world is convulsing, its governments mired in gridlock while a patient but unrelenting ecological crisis looms. America is in upheaval, battered by violent weather and extreme politics. In California in 2013, Tony Pietrus, a scientist studying deposits of undersea methane, receives a death threat. His fate will become bound to a stunning cast of characters--a broken drug addict, a star advertising strategist, a neurodivergent mathematician, a cunning eco-terrorist, an actor turned religious zealot, and a brazen young activist named Kate Morris, who, in the mountains of Wyoming, begins a project that will alter the course of the decades to come. From the Gulf Coast to Los Angeles, the Midwest to Washington, DC, their intertwined odysseys unfold against a stark backdrop of accelerating chaos as they summon courage, galvanize a nation, fall to their own fear, and find wild hope in the face of staggering odds. As their stories hurtle toward a spectacular climax, each faces a reckoning: what will they sacrifice to salvage humanity's last chance at a future? A singular achievement, The Deluge is a once-in-a-generation novel that meets the moment as few works of art ever have.

No library descriptions found.

Beskrivelse af bogen
Haiku-resume

Current Discussions

Ingen

Populære omslag

Quick Links

Vurdering

Gennemsnit: (3.94)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2
2.5
3 4
3.5 2
4 17
4.5 4
5 7

Er det dig?

Bliv LibraryThing-forfatter.

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Brugerbetingelser/Håndtering af brugeroplysninger | Hjælp/FAQs | Blog | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterladte biblioteker | Tidlige Anmeldere | Almen Viden | 201,797,467 bøger! | Topbjælke: Altid synlig