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Mont-Saint-Michel and Chartres (1905)

af Henry Adams

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9251116,858 (3.9)19
This first paperback facsimile of the classic 1913 edition includes thirteen photographs and numerous illustrations of the great cathedrals of Northern France. Henry Adams referred to this book as "A Study of Thirteenth-Century Unity," and its expansive scope, together with the author's deep understanding of the period, makes it a classic in art history as well as in American literature. He wrote, "I wanted to show the intensity of the vital energy of a given time, and of course that intensity had to be stated in its two highest terms-religion and art." Henry Adams' record of his journeys through France, searching for images of unity in an age of conflict, is accompanied by observations on literature, politics, religion, and maior church leaders such as Abelard, St. Francis of Assisi, and St. Thomas Aquinas.… (mere)

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Henry Adams toured French mediæval gothic architecture, and apparently took a lot of notes, focusing on the Grande Cathedrals of Mont-Saint-Michel (built in the 1100s) and Chartres (built in the late 1100s to 1200s). The notes became the book. If that were the extent of the book, however, it could be summed with a few nice photos and captions. But there’s also 360 pages of mystery and fascination surrounding the architecture. Most of the book is Adams’ observations on the culture surrounding the buildings, moreso than on the buildings themselves. Adams takes us on a gothic travelogue through the intrigues of mediæval royal families of France, clashes in the cloisters of church hierarchy, power struggles in church and court, dark-age philosophers and poets telling stories captured in sparkling gothic stained-glass perfection.

Reminiscent of Melville’s long chapters on the anatomy of the whale, there are long detailed descriptions of the elements of the cathedral. Wading through that pays off. The stories told literally and figuratively in the massive stained glass paintings, in themselves and in their relation to other architectural features, represent the heart and soul of people’s faith, fears, allegiances, loves, hates, and pivotal events of the time.

So many fascinating stories and events converge in the 1100s and 1200s: the Golden Legend; the founding of Orders; the Chanson de Roland as metaphor for Mont-Saint-Michel, or vice versa; the intellectual romance of Abélard and Héloïse, Christian of Troyes retelling the age-old story of Tristan and Iseult (originating from a pre-Islamic Persian story); the famous invention and flowering of “Courteous Love” and how it is epitomized in the chantefable Aucassins et Nicolette; the real-life romances of Thibaut and Blanche of Castille; the backdrop of the Crusades; the touching familial closeness of Richard Cœur de Lion and Mary of Champagne; the Magna Charta and the Zodiac Window; the scholastic vs. mystic battles of theology between Abélard and Bernard of Clairvaux; inquiries into universals of geometry and syllogisms, and unity versus multiplicity; the controversy of the two Popes and its effects on people’s careers. The book closes out the 1200s with Thomas Aquinas’ rise from “dumb ox” to Summa Theologica—building his Church Intellectual to complement the Church Architectural—a “gothic Cathedral to the Trinity” (329). As Adams puts it, “His sense of scale and proportion was that of the great architects of his age” (354, 355). For culture, science, and art, the equilibrium of the universe rested on the delicate balance of the flying buttresses.

To most people, the above references have little meaning, if any. But if you read this book, they will have a lot of meaning and enrich your experience. The broad brushstrokes across history, occasionally filled in with colorful detail, renewed my interest in the period. So after finishing the book, I searched on key people and events and found additional fascinating bits of historical intrigue. The book covers so much of the culture, arts, science, philosophy, politics, and social aspects of the period, it’s a great reference point for further investigation.
( )
  Coutre | Dec 23, 2020 |
This is a history of France in the 11th through the 13th Centuries, as told through architecture, and was very interesting. ( )
  JBarringer | Dec 30, 2017 |
Mr. Adams was a descendant of the Adamses of Massachusetts and could afford the travel necessary to write this description of two medieval masterpieces for the American public. Both studies have since been replaced by modern analyses of the their functions, but the initial work has charms. The style is literate, and not condescending. He is a keen observer of the sites, and meditates on them with a sensibility formed by the popular attitudes of the later nineteenth century, the mindset that created the arthuriana of Howard Pyle and many faux-medieval country houses. Restful to read as an artefact. ( )
  DinadansFriend | Dec 20, 2013 |
637. Mont-Saint Michel and Chartres, by Henry Adams (read 14 Dec 1960) Some of the imagery in this was far-fetched, I thought. ( )
  Schmerguls | Jul 23, 2013 |
This is a fascinating description and analysis not only of mediæval architecture but of twelfth and thirteenth century Western society, culture, and values and their connection to their history and their neighbours. A very civilised book.
  Fledgist | Nov 24, 2012 |
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» Tilføj andre forfattere (4 mulige)

Forfatter navnRolleHvilken slags forfatterVærk?Status
Henry Adamsprimær forfatteralle udgaverberegnet
Baskin, LeonardOmslagsdesignermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Carney, RaymondIntroduktionmedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Chamberlain, SamuelIllustratormedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Cram, Ralph AdamsIntroduktionmedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Samuels, ErnestIntroduktionmedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
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This first paperback facsimile of the classic 1913 edition includes thirteen photographs and numerous illustrations of the great cathedrals of Northern France. Henry Adams referred to this book as "A Study of Thirteenth-Century Unity," and its expansive scope, together with the author's deep understanding of the period, makes it a classic in art history as well as in American literature. He wrote, "I wanted to show the intensity of the vital energy of a given time, and of course that intensity had to be stated in its two highest terms-religion and art." Henry Adams' record of his journeys through France, searching for images of unity in an age of conflict, is accompanied by observations on literature, politics, religion, and maior church leaders such as Abelard, St. Francis of Assisi, and St. Thomas Aquinas.

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