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Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow

af Gabrielle Zevin

Andre forfattere: Se andre forfattere sektionen.

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
4,2221842,745 (4.1)135
"A modern love story about two childhood friends, Sam, raised by an actress mother in LA's Koreatown, and Sadie, from the wealthy Jewish enclave of Beverly Hills, who reunite as adults to create video games, finding an intimacy in digital worlds that eludes them in their real lives, from the New York Times best-selling author of The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry"--… (mere)
  1. 00
    The Unseen World af Liz Moore (pbirch01)
    pbirch01: Both involve computer programming, are set in both Boston and California, and include ruminations on the intersection between humans and technology
  2. 00
    Version Control af Dexter Palmer (pbirch01)
    pbirch01: Both use the idea of a conversation with someone who is not there as an equivalent to AI
  3. 00
    Goodbye for Now af Laurie Frankel (baystateRA)
    baystateRA: Algorithms and romantic attraction. Young computer start-up partners and how they can and can’t love each other. Bittersweet and beautifully written like Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow.
  4. 00
    The Startup Wife af Tahmima Anam (Othemts)
Indlæser...

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» Se også 135 omtaler

Engelsk (176)  Catalansk (2)  Hollandsk (1)  Ungarsk (1)  Alle sprog (180)
Viser 1-5 af 180 (næste | vis alle)
This book has several ups and downs. Each character is tragic, losing something dear and having an unclear resolution of anything gained in the loss. Sam and Sadie are complex in faults and their differences led to a satisfying ending.
  ohheybrian | Feb 23, 2024 |
A feat of multilayered storytelling that isn’t afraid to take risks and really truly offers up a book like no other. It’s a reading experience that, while not for everyone, is absolutely delightful in its own right and had me entertained the whole way through.

Adding because I don't see many people mention this: if you plan to read, PLEASE check for content warnings. They include emotional abuse, domestic violence, anti-Semitism, suicide, anti-Asian racism, homophobia, detailed descriptions of bodily injury/item protruding from body, mass gun violence, referenced abortion, PTSD, depression, post-partum depression, and several traumatic deaths. ( )
  deborahee | Feb 23, 2024 |
I had read this last year, but our book group is discussing it next week. I thought that I'd skim, maybe read a few chapters....well, I ended up falling right into the story and read the whole thing and loved it again. Last year I rated 4.5 stars, I am going to up it to 5 stars based on the re-read being so compelling.

I know that some folks had issues with parts of this book, especially the end. It's true that the main characters, Sadie and Sam, are both characters with some major flaws. But I loved the way the book chronicled the ups and downs of their friendship, and interwove the game world and the real world.

This time around I also enjoyed thinking about the way that the "real world" is also a game in some ways. Here's a quote that gets at that, from right at the beginning:

"A truly magnificent thing about the way the brain was coded, Sam thought, was that it couls say "Excuse me" while meaning "Screw you." Unless they were unreliable or clearly established as lunatics or scoundrels, characters in novels, movies, and games were meant to be taken at face value---the totality of what they did or what they said. But people--the ordinary, the de ent and basically honest--couldn't get through the day without that one indispensable bit of programming that allowed you to say one thing and mean, feel, even do, another." ( )
  banjo123 | Feb 17, 2024 |
I was a bit wary of starting this book, because the reviews are very 'Marmite' - and also, Sunday Times bestsellers are not my friends - but overall, I'm giving four stars for readability. Think Normal People does Ready Player One, written by Donna Tartt and following a plot from Tara Jenkins Reid - unlikeable characters, ridiculous plot, surprisingly addictive reading. And the gaming aspect didn't bother me, either - I have no interest in games, but Zevin writes programming and graphics like Walter Tevis covers chess.

Did I have issues with the book? Well, of course! The characters are irritating and wholly unrealistic, from Sadie the manic pixie mean girl who holds petty grievances against her 'best friend' and has bad taste in men, to Sam, who is only marginally less pathetic than Jude from A Little Life. Marx, the good-looking plot device of a best friend turned love interest, ticks so many boxes that he's just crying out for a Netflix adaptation. Also, the writing veers between narrative voices like Daisy Jones and is insultingly simplistic in places: “The poor man’s Chris Cornell,” Marx whispered, referencing the lead singer of the grunge band Soundgarden. Also, yes, I do know what doppelganger means and I'm embarrassed for any Americans who fall into Sam's dismissive demographic.

Quick to read, glad to finish. ( )
  AdonisGuilfoyle | Feb 8, 2024 |
In 2007, when I wrote a book about gaming in libraries, Will Wright was exploring how games could make people feel emotions (like guilt), and the US was slow in recognizing video games as an art form while the UK had already established an award category for video games at BAFTA, while I was arguing they were valid ways of telling a story that involved the player in the creation of that story. Zevin pesents a world where creators set out to make works of art, even based on the style of a famous work of art, in this brilliant, intricately plotted novel about friendship and gaming.

Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow follows the trajectory of two friends who love one another but never get together. Their partnership at Unfair Games, their video game company, is more important At twelve, Korean-American Sam is recovering from a car accident in the hospital while eleven-year old’s Sadie’s sister Alice is getting cancer treatment. They form a friendship playing Super Mario Bros. and the staff begs Sadie to come back and visit–Sam, coming to terms with his mother’s death and a crippling injury hadn’t spoken until she showed up. She makes him her bat mitzvah volunteer project and wins a community service award from Hadassah. When he finds out, they don’t talk for six years, until he spies her in a subway station–she’s attending MIT and he is at Harvard. Hollering “you have died of dysentery!” gets her attention, and they resume their friendship and eventually talking about designing a game together. His friend and roommate Marx bankrolls an apartment and they name Marx their producer; he takes care of many details for their company, their friendship, their lives. The narrative follows their intertwining paths through the games they design together.

With characters that attend Ivy league schools, the vocabulary is smart and lush: nihilistic, verisimilitude, deictic, obfuscation, jejune, azure, simulacrum, portmanteau, fecund, echt, tautology. The allusions reference The Phantom Tollbooth, Emily Dickinson, Shakespeare, the Illiad… and indirectly, Grand Theft Childhood. The timeline spans nearly twenty years and is set squarely in Generation X, with many familiar touchstones: Tamagotchis, Magic Eye, texting, same-sex marriage, MMORPGs, groundbreaking video game titles, September 11th.

The writing is spectacular and frequently, beautifully profound as the characters reflect on their abilities and disabilities; their identities and ethnicities; love and loss; mazes, puzzles, and maps; immortality and do-overs; art and sex and death and play. The narrative moves back and forth in time and yet never gets lost. So many details come back full circle, like when you die in a game and go back to the save point. Throughout the novel, the narrator breaks the fourth wall, such as when the reader is invited to consider an interview with game designer Sam Mazer in Kotaku. This also allows us to review events through a more modern lens of systemic racism, appropriation, and sexism. Another section goes meta like a game and changes the perspective to second person, playing on interactive text adventures. Another is in third person, narrating the lives of the avatars the characters create. Full disclosure: this book made me weep.

Sometimes the writing reminded me of Lev Grossman’s The Magicians, with its detail on coding and debugging akin to the drudgery of magic drills at Brakebills Academy and flawed dynamic characters who stick together no matter what. Sometimes it called to mind Francesca Lia Block’s Weetzie Bat, with it’s LA setting and evocative lists of things and strong sensory detail. And as a gamer about to turn 48, who cut her teeth on the Oregon Trail on a classroom’s Apple IIe and Donkey Kong on a cocktail arcade table at the local Papa Gino’s, I kept seeing this as a love letter to gaming that recognizes video games for the art they are.

I checked this out through OverDrive at my local public library and logged onto bookshop.org to order a copy and it’s currently out of print and backordered! I blame Harry and his 2 million copy first print run.

https://hiplibrariansbookblog.com/2023/01/13/tomorrow-and-tomorrow-and-tomorrow-... ( )
  informationgoddess29 | Feb 4, 2024 |
Viser 1-5 af 180 (næste | vis alle)
To me, Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow is not about video games or work. It is about stories.

What Sadie and Sam do in the novel – through the guise of video game design – is create stories with and for each other. Unable to replay their past, as both the main characters grow older they re-interpret their shared history to play out their future with each other. Unwilling (or unable) to allow Sadie to leave his life, Sam uses the work of game design to try to keep her creating shared stories with him.

A relationship is just another form of world-building.
 
Her story begins around the turn of the century, when two college students, Samson Mazer (mathematics at Harvard) and Sadie Green (computer science at MIT), bump into each other at a train station. The pair haven’t spoken since childhood, when they met in the games room of a hospital
tilføjet af rakerman | RedigerThe Guardian, Pippa Bailey (Jul 18, 2022)
 
Gabrielle Zevin is (...) a Literary Gamer — in fact, she describes her devotion to the medium as “lifelong” — and in her delightful and absorbing new novel, “Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow,” Richard Powers’s “Galatea 2.2” and the stealth-action video game “Metal Gear Solid” stand uncontroversially side by side in the minds of her characters as foundational source texts.

...

whimsicruelty — a smiling, bright-eyed march into pitch-black narrative material
tilføjet af rakerman | RedigerNew York Times, Tom Bissel (pay site) (Jul 8, 2022)
 

» Tilføj andre forfattere (1 mulig)

Forfatter navnRolleHvilken slags forfatterVærk?Status
Gabrielle Zevinprimær forfatteralle udgaverberegnet
Cihi, JulianFortællermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Kim, JenniferFortællermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet

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That Love is all there is,
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Before Mazer invented himself as Mazer, he was Samson Mazer, and before he was Samson Mazer, he was Samson Masur--a change of two letters that transformed him from a nice, ostensibly Jewish boy to a Professional Builder of Worlds--and for most of his youth, he was Sam, S.A.M. on the hall of fame on his grandfather's Donkey Kong machine, but mainly Sam.
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"A modern love story about two childhood friends, Sam, raised by an actress mother in LA's Koreatown, and Sadie, from the wealthy Jewish enclave of Beverly Hills, who reunite as adults to create video games, finding an intimacy in digital worlds that eludes them in their real lives, from the New York Times best-selling author of The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry"--

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