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Aztec Blood af Gary Jennings
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Aztec Blood (original 2001; udgave 2002)

af Gary Jennings (Forfatter)

Serier: Aztec (Book 3)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
280271,094 (3.52)9
The third volume in Gary Jennings' historical epic that began with theAztecandAztec Autumn. Now comes the thrillingAztec Blood. In this colorful and exciting era of swords and cloaks, upheaval and revolution, a young beggar boy, in whose blood runs that of both Spanish and Aztec royalty must claim his birthright. From the torrid streets of the City of the Dead along the Veracruz Coast to the ageless glory of Seville in Old Spain, Cristo the Bastardo connives fights, and loves as he seeks the truth--without knowing that he will be the founder of a proud new people. As we follow the loves and adventures of Cristo and experience the colorful splendor and barbarism of the era, a vanished culture is brought back to life in all its magnificence. "This exotic, sensuous novel works on many levels. It is at once history, mystery, and a coming-of-age novel all permeated by the teeming world of seventeenth century Mexico as seen through the eyes of a teenage boy." --Library Journal… (mere)
Medlem:kmactavish
Titel:Aztec Blood
Forfattere:Gary Jennings (Forfatter)
Info:Tor Books (2002), 768 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:fiction

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Aztec Blood af Gary Jennings (2001)

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First, I have to confess that I'm a big fan of Gary Jennings. Whatever one thinks of his early work (i.e. what was published while he was still alive), it's broad in scope, rich in detail, and absolutely epic. What really grabs me, though, is his intricacy and the texture he's able to draw across his broad landscapes.

"Aztec Blood" is the first of several books (and more on the way) written based on notes and outlines and published after his death. While "Aztec Blood" (the third in his "Aztec" series) doesn't compete or compare well head-to-head with his original "Aztec", I found myself drawn in and gobbling up all 750 pages.

For fans of his earlier Aztec work, there are no direct connections between "Blood" and "Aztec" and "Aztec Autumn". But the characteristics of his main character, Cristo the Bastardo, are similar to the protagonists in the other two books - he's adventurous, very self-aware, and very prone to drama.

It's impossible to truly summarize the story here...I will leave that to previous reviewers and book summaries. Suffice it to say that "Aztec Blood" is heavily focused on the class differences of early-to-mid Spanish Colonialism in post-conquest Mexico. In Cristo's journeys of self discovery in which he's seeking both physical and spiritual origins, the reader explores the impact of the Spanish Conquest on native "indios", first generation-born new world Spaniards, and old world Spaniards as well. It's terrifically insightful and rich in the history and research that one finds in Jennings' other work.

The story contains sword fights, heroic rescues and escapes, love, sex and multiple detailed run-ins with the Spanish Inquisition.

Characters bounce in and out, often falling subject to Cristo's ill-fated existence. The most persistent of characters is Mateo...a living Don Quixote who pulls Cristo along as he chases innumerable windmills. At first Mateo is a bit predictable and fairly unlikeable (purposely so, for the record), but I found myself almost audibly cheering for the two banditos as they traipse across New Spain and the Atlantic following women, riches and schemes in the typically broad Jennings landscape.

The books is not great. But it pulled me in: I cared about the characters...I cared how the persistent dramatic threads concluded (and there were many threads)...and I was drawn to feel as the characters felt. I didn't love the ending, but I felt resolved and satisfied. The journey of reading Jennings more than makes up for any specific flaws in the stories themselves.

I recommend this enjoyable read. ( )
1 stem JGolomb | Aug 4, 2010 |
It isn't quite what Gary Jennings would have done, I'm sure, but this ghost writer still does a worthy job at entertaining. The greatest divergence from Jennings is the emphasis on Spain rather than the Aztec culture, and this ghost writer seems more adverse to writing tragedy.

Edit: I've since learned that Gary Jennings had most of this written in draft upon his death, and his editor then completed it. It does capture and carry the same general tone as the previous books, but its violence is toned down and the ending is happier as noted; maybe those were the editor's contributions. As usual in these cases, we'll never know (i.e., never be told). ( )
  Cecrow | Jan 8, 2008 |
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Aztec (Book 3)
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Oprindelig udgivelsesdato
Personer/Figurer
Vigtige steder
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Beslægtede film
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Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
The birth of a great people occurred after the conquest of Mexico and the mix of Spanish and indigenous blood:

     All mixed bloods were called castas . . . These street people, who huddled, starved, and begged on every corner of the town . . . were known as léperos. Social lepers, they begged, did odd jobs, and robbed. By the seventeenth century, mobs of léperos thronged the capital and constituted a growing threat to public order. They could be wantonly destructive, even murderous . . . they were the first Mexican bandits . . .

     The lépero lived as he could . . . ready to cut either a throat or a purse, begging for food or work, screaming under the whips of the town authorities . . .

     Ironically, the léperos were to survive, grow, and finally inherit modern Mexico. They proved, not the degeneracy of man, but mankind's tenacity in the face of hideous adversity.

                                        - T. R. Fehrenback, Fire and Blood
Does any man truly know who his father is?

- Homer, The Odyssey
Often not a whisper of trouble reached the accused until the blow actually fell . . . Kept in solitary imprisonment, cut off entirely from his friends outside, denied the sympathy of support he might derive from their visits or communications, he was left to brood despairingly, a prey to agonized doubts, in ignorance even of the charges brought against him.

                              - Maj. Arthur Griffiths, In Spanish Prisons
Tilegnelse
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
For Joyce Servis

Also with gratitude to
Junius Podrug and Robert Gleason,
Gary Jennings's editor
Første ord
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
To His Most Excellency Don Diego Veles de Maldonato y
Pimentel, Conde de Priego, Marqués de la Marche, Knight of
Santiago, Viceroy of New Spain by Appointment of His Most
Catholic Majesty Emperor Felipe, our Lord King


As Capitán of the Guard for Your Most Excellency's prison, it has been my duty to examine on Cristóbal, known to all as Cristo the Bastardo.
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The third volume in Gary Jennings' historical epic that began with theAztecandAztec Autumn. Now comes the thrillingAztec Blood. In this colorful and exciting era of swords and cloaks, upheaval and revolution, a young beggar boy, in whose blood runs that of both Spanish and Aztec royalty must claim his birthright. From the torrid streets of the City of the Dead along the Veracruz Coast to the ageless glory of Seville in Old Spain, Cristo the Bastardo connives fights, and loves as he seeks the truth--without knowing that he will be the founder of a proud new people. As we follow the loves and adventures of Cristo and experience the colorful splendor and barbarism of the era, a vanished culture is brought back to life in all its magnificence. "This exotic, sensuous novel works on many levels. It is at once history, mystery, and a coming-of-age novel all permeated by the teeming world of seventeenth century Mexico as seen through the eyes of a teenage boy." --Library Journal

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