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Janis Joplin : paratiisin arvet af Alice…
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Janis Joplin : paratiisin arvet (udgave 2000)

af Alice Echols

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
283870,205 (3.91)3
Janis Joplin was the skyrocket chick of the sixties, the woman who broke into the boys' club of rock and out of the stifling good-girl femininity of postwar America. With her incredible wall-of-sound vocals, Joplin was the voice of a generation, and when she OD'd on heroin in October 1970, a generation's dreams crashed and burned with her. Alice Echols pushes past the legary Joplin-the red-hot mama of her own invention-as well as the familiar portrait of the screwed-up star victimized by the era she symbolized, to examine the roots of Joplin's muscianship and explore a generation's experiment with high-risk living and the terrible price it exacted. A deeply affecting biography of one of America's most brilliant and tormented stars, Scars of Sweet Paradise is also a vivid and incisive cultural history of an era that changed the world for us all.… (mere)
Medlem:dognose
Titel:Janis Joplin : paratiisin arvet
Forfattere:Alice Echols
Info:Helsinki : Like, 2000.
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

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Scars of Sweet Paradise: The Life and Times of Janis Joplin af Alice Echols

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Viser 1-5 af 8 (næste | vis alle)
I seem to be collecting the life stories of troubled singers at the moment! A tragic member of the 27 club, Janis Joplin was an incredible natural talent, her voice a 'powerful combination of intellect and spontaneous feeling' behind songs like 'Piece of My Heart', 'Me and Bobby McGee' and 'Mercedes Benz'. She released four albums, two of them with her band Big Brother and the Holding Company, and embodied the San Francisco spirit of the 1960s, before sadly overdosing in 1970. There wouldn't seem to be enough of a life to write about, but Alice Echols does justice to her subject, without simpering or sniping (although her claim that 'this book is not a blow-by-blow account of Janis' every fuck and fix' is a bit of a stretch).

Like her 'chameleon's voice' - the 'gravelly Bessie Smith voice' she was known for, but also her natural 'clear and pure' tones - Janis was a woman of contrasting personas. She was the foul-mouthed, cackling star who posed naked, drank and took drugs to excess, but also the intelligent, insecure 'little girl blue' who needed a mother figure and was vulnerable and far too trusting. She loved both men and women, but only wanted to find that 'white picket' life and didn't want to be claimed as a gay role model. And even though she knew she had a good voice, she never truly believed in herself, remembering how she was tormented at high school for her different appearance rather than making the most of her sudden rise to stardom. As I say, another troubled singer, but a fantastic one! Well worth reading about, too. ( )
  AdonisGuilfoyle | Apr 8, 2017 |
I feel like this book was a musical education for me. By completion, I had streamed at least 33 new artists that were mentioned briefly or in-depth in the book. (My favorites, if you’re curious, would be Wanda Jackson, Janis Martin, Lead Belly, The Byrds, and Brownie McGhee and Sonny Terry.) It sort of revived 60s-70s music on my playlist, and quite a few bands are now on my constant musical rotation. Not only is the amount of music mentioned mind-boggling, but the era the book takes place (50s-60s) is written with incredible detail. It talks about the culture, not just in terms of the counterculture, but the “squares” too, as well as gender and skin inequalities, and even pre-50s about the beginning stirrings of what would later be called rock and roll.

To be perfectly honest, I’ve never really held an opinion about Janis Joplin, other than people occasionally telling me I looked like her when I was in high school. Apparently, that was meant as a sort of insult, as people—including Janis herself—often remarked that she was unattractive. To me, though, she never looked bad. I thought she looked natural and pretty, actually. But whatever. I found myself relating hardcore to a lot of Janis’ perceptions on life and school. Growing up, I never really fit in, and even now, I find it easier to hang out with a group of dudes than women. I’ve always been supremely self-conscious, and I’m the first person to talk crap about myself to anyone who will listen. I also felt jilted by the unfair treatment of my classmates growing up, who perceived me as weird and strange. It was interesting to read about her life’s experiences, and how a lot of that isolation shaped her and made her demand that people listen to her, as she gained fame.

SPOILERS (SORT OF):
Things I learned while reading this book:
-About the first light shows and how they came about in the 60s.
-How the charming hippie lifestyle that is so waxed so poetically about was not nearly as gender equitable as people would have you believe.
-Everyone knows about Woodstock, but Monetary Pop Festival was actually the landmark festival that is known for starting off “The Summer of Love,” and inspiring Woodstock and countless other rock festivals.
-“Cheap Thrills,” with Janis and Big Brother, was made to sound like a live album—complete with staged whistling and glass-breaking. This was because it was believed their raw, unpolished sound was at its best when it was live. All those little “mistakes,” and when her voices breaks, could be simply attributed to the “live” nature of the album, not the unpolished way they actually sounded.
-Janis’ favorite liquor was Southern Comfort. Kind of funny, since that was definitely the kind of liquor everyone drank in college.

THE VERDICT:
This book is very frank, very poignant, and very well-written. It includes first-person accounts from Janis’ friends and family (through a few quotes), and writes very logically and factually about incidents that took place during her life. Of course, the author presupposes things, the way Janis might have felt about things, but she backs up a lot of these logically, so it doesn’t seem to crazy that Janis was thinking those things. I think anyone could potentially enjoy this book. It’s meticulously written, informative, fascinating, and it really immerses you in the counterculture of the 60s. As someone who never really any special interest in Janis, I am now thoroughly fascinated. ( )
  Lauraborealis | Mar 17, 2017 |
Very well written, very scholarly, and also rather sedate and dry - which is a complete contrast with the life laid out here by Alice Echols. It's a calm walk alongside Janis' turbulent life, unlike other Janis bios that tend towards scandal and sensation. Echols reports her findings almost clinically and more like a historical journal. Almost the antithesis of the 60s.... and this seems to be where the strength lies in this book. Not your regular "sex drugs and rock and roll" scandal bio. ( )
  TurtleCreekBooks | Dec 11, 2010 |
This portrait of Joplin strives to find something to say that any casual fan wouldn't already know, but only manages occasionally. Still, it does show the importance of revisiting and reconsidering eras of history (like the 60s) that you think you know everything about. Echols is particularly sensitive to the complex relationship between white 60s rockers and the black blues and soul artists who inspired them, only to be usurped by them. ( )
  amydross | Sep 15, 2010 |
I read this back when it first came out & really enjoyed it, but my copy wandered away somewhere so when I saw it at Half-Price books in the U-District in Seattle I knew I wanted to read it again.

I love Janis Joplin - both her music & her spirit. I've read Myra Friedman's Buried Alive: The Biography of Janis Joplin several times, as well. This book offers a somewhat different perspective as it is striving to place Joplin within her cultural context.

I remembered that this biography had more information about the Haight-Ashbury scene than it did, but other than that it was pretty true to my memory. I like the somewhat dispassionate voice of Ms. Echols - it provides a nice counterpoint to the general chaos & excess of its subject & time. I also appreciate that Ms. Echols doesn't try to pigeonhole Joplin, but rather explores her life & her impulses.

There is much to admire in Janis Joplin & much that I relate to in her story. It's hard to be different in a small town & to want acceptance, but be unable or unwilling to become the person who might be accepted. I get her insecurities that coexist with her confidence in herself. I admire her drive & ambition & her overarching talent & I get why she anesthetized herself with alcohol & heroin. It's sad that she overdosed before she could live long enough to figure out that acceptance from the kind of people who require you to be someone you're not isn't really acceptance at all. I like to think she would've grown into her voice, into her abilities, & into herself. ( )
  kraaivrouw | Aug 29, 2009 |
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Alice Echolsprimær forfatteralle udgaverberegnet
Rolle, EkkehardOversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
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If you don't believe there's a price/For this sweet paradise/Just remind me to show you the scars -Bob Dylan "Where Are You Tonight?"
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For my mother and in memory of my father
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When Janis Joplin was a small child her mother found her one night ourside on the sidewalk sleepwalking away from their house. -Introduction
"What's happening never happens there," was how Janis summed up life in her hometown. -Chapter 1, The Great Nowhere
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kids fleeing “the emotional dust bowl of their families, their schools, their hometowns, and their jobs.
Janis’s fame had revealed the limits of the 'San Francisco free thing,' but her real sin was in being a ballsy broad, a chick with acne who took up too much space in the boys’ club of late-sixties rock ’n’ roll. The rock culture of those years was so profoundly masculine that the first time Rolling Stone paid any attention to women, it was in an issue devoted to groupies. As Robert Christgau once noted, 'rock and roll was a shitty place for women.' And San Francisco was no more enlightened than the rest of the country. Women musicians there encountered 'very primitive attitudes,' says Tracy Nelson, the female singer of Mother Earth. Nor did success insulate Janis from sexism; in fact, the more famous she became, the more difficult life grew. When Bob Simmons asked one of the guys in the band if Big Brother would play a benefit for the Avalon, he was told to call Janis: 'That’s the man you gotta talk to.' Janis wasn’t exaggerating when she said about those difficult months, 'They sure laid a lot of shit on me.”"
"And in a world where women were just chicks and old ladies, Janis was seen by some as an uppity, back-stabbing bitch. Following her success, she was considered an obnoxious diva whenever she got huffy with a stagehand, even though the same behavior was perfectly acceptable in male rock stars."
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Janis Joplin was the skyrocket chick of the sixties, the woman who broke into the boys' club of rock and out of the stifling good-girl femininity of postwar America. With her incredible wall-of-sound vocals, Joplin was the voice of a generation, and when she OD'd on heroin in October 1970, a generation's dreams crashed and burned with her. Alice Echols pushes past the legary Joplin-the red-hot mama of her own invention-as well as the familiar portrait of the screwed-up star victimized by the era she symbolized, to examine the roots of Joplin's muscianship and explore a generation's experiment with high-risk living and the terrible price it exacted. A deeply affecting biography of one of America's most brilliant and tormented stars, Scars of Sweet Paradise is also a vivid and incisive cultural history of an era that changed the world for us all.

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