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The Sentinel: A Jack Reacher Novel af Lee…
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The Sentinel: A Jack Reacher Novel (udgave 2020)

af Lee Child (Forfatter), Andrew Child (Forfatter)

Serier: Jack Reacher (25)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
4702138,846 (3.64)22
Medlem:Romonko
Titel:The Sentinel: A Jack Reacher Novel
Forfattere:Lee Child (Forfatter)
Andre forfattere:Andrew Child (Forfatter)
Info:Delacorte Press (2020), Edition: First Edition, 368 pages
Samlinger:Series, e-Book
Vurdering:***
Nøgleord:Fiction, Thriller, Jack Reacher, American, Mystery

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The Sentinel af Lee Child

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Viser 1-5 af 21 (næste | vis alle)
Over the span of the Jack Reacher novels I came to a point where I wanted change. I thought Jack was getting a little stale as a character account of the cookie cutter approach of the novels. I always wondered why Jack didn't grow/mature as a character. That question was answered by Child himself when I had a chance to hear him speak in person and was asked that very question. His answer was that Jack wasn't going to change because he, Child, was writing for the avid readers who followed Reacher's cause and had definite expectations. I accepted that at the time but was intrigued when I read his newest book was going to be a joint venture with his brother and Reacher's character would reflect some changes moving forward. The problem, however, is that this novel is like a time-tested recipe where the cook altered some of the ingredients without thinking about the final product. All, or most of the ingredients of the previous Reacher novels are present in some form or fashion in the Sentinel; however, it's like the cook, or in this case the writers, forgot to mix them in the right proportion to produce a product that was still appetizing to the reader. The plot wanders aimlessly through a series of "Reacher" confrontations loosely driven by any number of nefarious bad guys ranging from Russians to Nazis ... somewhat explained but never really developed in terms the underlying issues faced by Rutherford's character. I struggled to get through this one. There simply was nothing that compelled me as a reader to take a stake in what was going on. Sadly, if more attention had been taken to flesh out the narrative with Reacher's character as the driving force it always has been this novel could have knocked it out of the park. ( )
  Hardboiled | Feb 4, 2021 |
I read a review that suggested the addition of Andrew Child to the authorship of the novel made a perceptible impact. Not for me, continues to be enjoyable brain-candy for me. ( )
  brakketh | Jan 30, 2021 |
Yes, he's different and I'm not sure I'm quite on board with the new cerebral Jack Reacher. I knew when i saw that Lee Child (pen name) was co-authoring with his younger brother that it would be different, but after 24 books (this is number 25), maybe it would be a nice change. The ghost of the old Jack Reacher is there, but the essence of Jack Reacher is gone. I kept looking for him, but couldn't find it. Since when would Jack Reacher ever text? When would he ever look at different options when contemplating how to get out of a jam? When would he ever think about non-violent ways to get out of that jam? The pace was different too and maybe that was slowed down by all the thinking (?) that Jack did throughout. Lee Child always used short, spare sentences which moved the pace along at a fast clip. The sentences in this book were long and well-constructed. Sorry. This is not my Jack Reacher. I read the whole book looking for the essence of Jack, but didn't find it. The plot was well-constructed, and the bad guys were horrific, but Jack seemed to just swagger his way through the book, and didn't seem to get involved mentally or emotionally engaged. I gave it an effort, but I found the book wanting. I may have come to the end of the road for one of my favourite anti-heroes. That list has been depleted lately with changes authors have made to their plotting and storyline. ( )
  Romonko | Jan 20, 2021 |
The Sentinel (2020) (Reacher #25) by Lee Child.
I find it hard to write about his book without telling you of the major league spoiler that will be found in the next paragraph. The revelation doesn’t come until about half way into the book, but it is upon this that the entire story revolves. Don’t blame me if you continue to read and then get upset. You have no one to blame but yourself!!!
The Sentinel is a super secret computer program that was designed to safeguard America’s voting process. It works very well. To some foreign agencies, Russia in particular, it works too well. They want it and will stop at almost nothing to procure it.
Something to think about after the last two elections.
Reacher solves a small problem for a band he happened to hear in a club in Nashville. Heading out of town he gets a ride with an insurance executive heading out to a small town to help solve a problem. The town’s computers are being held for ransom. The former IT director for the town has been blamed for the breach and is now an outcast. And, upon entering the small town, he is the first person reacher notices.
It is hard to miss when a man, absent-mindedly walking down the street, is being grabbed by several people and tossed into the back of a car. Reacher, being who he is, sees the set-up unfolding and steps in to lend a hand, or rather a fist or two.
Later, in a coffee shop, Reacher hears the man’s tale and decides there is more going on than just some hatred for the ex-town official. A lot more.
Events seem to spiral as they usually do in a Lee Child novel. While the pace is slow to begin with it ramps up fairly quickly until the final burst of action.
Mr. Child wrote this book with his son, Andrew Child. The younger Child is an accomplished author in his own right and he brings a subtle newness to the series. ( )
  TomDonaghey | Jan 13, 2021 |
I had fallen a few books behind in Lee Child's Jack Reacher series, but when I read that he was passing the reins to his brother Andrew Child, I thought I would catch up with the latest (#25) - The Sentinel. Going forward it will be Andrew Child only.

Reacher does what he does best - just travelling across the country. His latest ride lets him off in Pleasantville, Tennessee. And true to form, he finds trouble when he see injustice and steps in to even the odds. Told to leave town, he digs his heels in even deeper.

I think that's what we all love about Reacher - he's the guy that will stick up for the underdog and right a wrong - in Jack Reacher style. And that style includes some great dialogue before the fists fly. "Rule one: if you don’t know the trouble you’re in, keep Reacher by your side."

This latest book has a fairly intricate plot bringing in a US Intelligence Agency, Nazis, Russians and more. Take that grain of salt and just enjoy a great escapist read.

Now, I am sure Jack Reacher purists will find some fault with someone new. Inevitable. (I noticed he talked a little more and used some technology) But for me, I was entertained and engaged with the book. And that's all I'm asking for - and The Sentinel delivered.

I chose to listen to The Sentinel. I was thrilled to see that the narrator had changed from previous novels and Scott Brick (a favorite of mine) was the new voice. He has the most expressive voice, easy to understand and great to listen to. He interprets the book very well and showcases the book fantastically. The action, tension and more are effortlessly presented for the listener. ( )
  Twink | Jan 7, 2021 |
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Lee Childprimær forfatteralle udgaverberegnet
Child, AndrewForfatterhovedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet

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