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Ace: What Asexuality Reveals About Desire,…
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Ace: What Asexuality Reveals About Desire, Society, and the Meaning of Sex (original 2020; udgave 2021)

af Angela Chen (Forfatter)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
5811941,459 (4.07)6
LGBTQIA+ (Nonfiction.) Psychology. Sociology. Nonfiction. HTML:An engaging exploration of what it means to be asexual in a world that??s obsessed with sexual attraction, and what the ace perspective can teach all of us about desire and identity.
What exactly is sexual attraction and what is it like to go through life not experiencing it? What does asexuality reveal about gender roles, about romance and consent, and the pressures of society? This accessible examination of asexuality shows that the issues that aces face??confusion around sexual activity, the intersection of sexuality and identity, navigating different needs in relationships??are the same conflicts that nearly all of us will experience. Through a blend of reporting, cultural criticism, and memoir, Ace addresses the misconceptions around the ??A? of LGBTQIA and invites everyone to rethink pleasure and intimacy.
Journalist Angela Chen creates her path to understanding her own asexuality with the perspectives of a diverse group of asexual people. Vulnerable and honest, these stories include a woman who had blood tests done because she was convinced that ??not wanting sex? was a sign of serious illness, and a man who grew up in a religious household and did everything ??right,? only to realize after marriage that his experience of sexuality had never been the same as that of others. Disabled aces, aces of color, gender-nonconforming aces, and aces who both do and don??t want romantic relationships all share their experiences navigating a society in which a lack of sexual attraction is considered abnormal. Chen??s careful cultural analysis explores how societal norms limit understanding of sex and relationships and celebrates the br
… (mere)
Medlem:Mike_B
Titel:Ace: What Asexuality Reveals About Desire, Society, and the Meaning of Sex
Forfattere:Angela Chen (Forfatter)
Info:Beacon Press (2021), 224 pages
Samlinger:Read
Vurdering:****
Nøgleord:Ingen

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Ace: What Asexuality Reveals About Desire, Society, and the Meaning of Sex af Angela Chen (2020)

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» Se også 6 omtaler

Engelsk (16)  Italiensk (1)  Alle sprog (17)
Viser 1-5 af 17 (næste | vis alle)
I'd only heard good things about this book and it did not disappoint. I had some extra interest in this topic as the majority of friends I have made in fandom identify somewhere in the ace/aro spectrum/area. In the book, Chen mentions the tension between writing to give those who are asexual an opportunity to see themselves and writing to explain asexuality to allos (the rest of us), and I think the final product is a vital piece of the conversation for anyone wanting to think deeply about desire and identity.

The combination of personal reflection, interviews, and cultural criticism worked very well for me. I especially appreciated that Chen's commitment to exploring intersectionality with ace identity wasn't just one chapter of the book, it really WAS the book. The way societal scripts of how we are "supposed to" experience desire are so determined by gender, race, ability... Wouldn't we all be better off if we felt less bound to these predetermined scripts? ( )
  greeniezona | Mar 10, 2024 |
4.5 stars, this is excellent. Sexuality is a spectrum and all points on it are valid. There's a lot here that I just need more information on or more time to process - it seems like ace and alo relationships often end up open? And romance vs sexual attraction is still a head scratcher for me. ( )
  KallieGrace | Feb 27, 2024 |
This book is the bee's knees! It's important, groundbreaking, and validating. Everyone on the ace spectrum should read it... and give a copy to friends... or "friends"... who harass and try to gaslight you for being ace. For that matter, people who aren't ace should read it, too. ( )
  swigget | Feb 25, 2024 |
Ace è il libro che sognavo di leggere da quando ho finito di digerire cosa fosse l’asessualità e in che modo fosse sempre stata una parte di me. Volevo leggere qualcosa che non soltanto risonasse con il mio vissuto, ma che portasse la ricchezza dell’esperienza asessuale nella nostra società, in modo da metterne in luce quelle storture che rimangono nascoste sotto strati di inconsapevolezza e convenzioni. Anche quest’orientamento così spesso banalizzato in quellз che non fanno sesso ha molto da dire sulle dinamiche relazionali e su come la sessualità compulsiva sia tossica per chiunque, non solo le persone asessuali.

Chen parte dalla sua storia personale e da quella di altre persone asessuali per mostrare come l’idea che tutti gli esseri umani normali e sani debbano necessariamente avere un certo livello di desiderio di fare sesso – quella che viene chiamata sessualità compulsiva – porta a disumanizzare tuttз coloro che non vogliono farlo. Rifiutarsi di avere rapporti sessuali senza una motivazione ritenuta valida (sia pure Ho il mal di testa), porta immediatamente a pensare che ci sia un qualche problema di salute – un’idea appoggiata in parte anche dal Manuale diagnostico e statistico dei disturbi mentali, che prevede l’esistenza di un disturbo del desiderio sessuale ipoattivo – oppure un rifiuto a impegnarsi seriamente nella relazione.

Ancora peggio quando la sessualità compulsiva si sposa con altre idee oscure della nostra società, come l’impossibilità, per una persona disabile, di avere una vita sessuale proprio a causa della sua disabilità – e quindi la conseguente difficoltà per chi è disabile e asessuale di riconoscere, e veder riconosciuto, il proprio orientamento come una parte di sé e non della propria disabilità. Oppure la necessità di mettere un freno alla sessualità di persone razzializzate perché ritenuta eccessiva e pericolosa per il mantenimento di una inesistente purezza razziale – e la conseguente difficoltà di far emergere l’asessualità perché ritenuta una cosa da bianchз.

Liberare la sessualità dalle rigide gabbie che la volevano accettabile solo a certe condizioni e lasciare le persone libere di praticarla come meglio si confà loro è stata una tappa fondamentale e un processo ancora in corso. Tuttavia, nessunǝ sarà davvero liberǝ finché alla piena libertà di dire sì si affiancherà la libertà di dire no senza temere alcuna conseguenza, alcun giudizio e alcuna patologizzazione. ( )
  lasiepedimore | Jan 18, 2024 |
I feel really bad for rating this book so low because education about asexuality is so important. But I found myself getting frustrated at several points. I'm going to write a review now but I might come back and add to it later. I feel like she covers a lot of important points but I found myself wishing that it had just been a book about compulsory sexuality (which it mostly was) since I didn't particularly enjoy the parts where she talks about herself (she keeps justifying why she ha sex with her boyfriend and often gets repetitive or off track). I'd say that this book is a good exploration of compulsory sexuality but I wouldn't necessarily send people here to learn about asexuality (although there aren't many options...) as this part feels very fragmented between the stronger thread of components of the harms of society's expectations around sex.

But anyway. Some of the things that annoyed me:

Firstly. The dedication. It made me uncomfortable as it very much plays into compulsory sexuality. Many of us don't feel like we are lacking anything because we don't experience sexual attraction. I have never wanted "more" because I am not missing something...

This is a big one because it's a trend I've seen a lot on the online asexual community. Whenever she mentions repulsed people (of which I am one) she has to go one to remind the reader that asexual can have and enjoy sex. Yes, there is a spectrum, but as someone who has had unwanted advanced because of the constant emphasis on neutral and favourable people (no hate to you!) I wish that repulsion could just stand by itself sometimes rather than a prelude to some kind of "but there are others not like THEM".

The author states several times that she's maybe not 100% confident in her sexuality. And this is perfectly okay. But maybe then put more focus on other people instead of trying to justify yourself to the reader?

The false equivalences. No means no doesn't mean that there isn't a range of consents. People saying rape is violence rather than sex doesn't mean that all sex is good.

It jumps around a lot. She'll mention "person X from place Y" in multiple very split up places and it's difficult to keep track of individual stories.

I didn't like the part about aro people and QPRs. It wasn't particularly clear and I often found it to be contradictory. And why, just why would you use killers to introduce this theme??? Aro people are already stereotypically pained as all kinds of negative related things.

The whole discussion about HSDD. Is it a problem that asexual people are diagnosed? Yes. I agree with that. But does that mean it shouldn't exist? No? Of course not? If people are genuinely distressed by their lack of desire (which is separate from attraction anyway?) they should have a way forward and diagnoses can help with that. Don't tell allos it isn't helpful and that maybe they should consider identifying as ace or just get over it instead. Does compulsory sexuality feed into this in a bad way? Of course. But that doesn't mean it's not helpful.

She criticises the asexual community for being too white and goes on to focus on a very small subset (white, middle class, largely American, etc). I mean, at least she was upfront about it but this could have been such a great opportunity to uplift the voices she feels are being drowned out. I also find it troubling that she presents a lot of it as truths. As someone who is from a very different part of the world I can tell you I've had very different experiences. The fact that she states what she's found as the absolute truth is... let's just say not good. Since she has never met a gold star asexual (i.e. no other reasons to not be having sex and never having wanted it) she concludes they can't exist. I have met a handful of aces (far fewer than her since she did research and reached out) and I can tell you they do. While maybe people being so certain about who they are may make others feel confused about their identity it doesn't mean we should be erasing these experiences (especially since most people confident in their asexuality doesn't even use it to belittle others???)

Anyway, I'm going to leave this for now. I had to delay writing this for internet reasons so I may be back later if I remember something else. ( )
  TheAceOfPages | Dec 31, 2023 |
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LGBTQIA+ (Nonfiction.) Psychology. Sociology. Nonfiction. HTML:An engaging exploration of what it means to be asexual in a world that??s obsessed with sexual attraction, and what the ace perspective can teach all of us about desire and identity.
What exactly is sexual attraction and what is it like to go through life not experiencing it? What does asexuality reveal about gender roles, about romance and consent, and the pressures of society? This accessible examination of asexuality shows that the issues that aces face??confusion around sexual activity, the intersection of sexuality and identity, navigating different needs in relationships??are the same conflicts that nearly all of us will experience. Through a blend of reporting, cultural criticism, and memoir, Ace addresses the misconceptions around the ??A? of LGBTQIA and invites everyone to rethink pleasure and intimacy.
Journalist Angela Chen creates her path to understanding her own asexuality with the perspectives of a diverse group of asexual people. Vulnerable and honest, these stories include a woman who had blood tests done because she was convinced that ??not wanting sex? was a sign of serious illness, and a man who grew up in a religious household and did everything ??right,? only to realize after marriage that his experience of sexuality had never been the same as that of others. Disabled aces, aces of color, gender-nonconforming aces, and aces who both do and don??t want romantic relationships all share their experiences navigating a society in which a lack of sexual attraction is considered abnormal. Chen??s careful cultural analysis explores how societal norms limit understanding of sex and relationships and celebrates the br

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