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Confederates in the Attic: Dispatches from…
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Confederates in the Attic: Dispatches from the Unfinished Civil War (udgave 1999)

af Tony Horwitz

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
2,767703,882 (4.11)302
Propelled by his boyhood passion for the Civil War, Horwitz embarks on a search for places and people still held in thrall by America's greatest conflict. The result is an adventure into the soul of the unvanquished South, where the ghosts of the Lost Cause are resurrected through ritual and remembrance. He joins "hardcore" reenactors; witnesses Klan rallies and calls for race war; finds that Andersonville Prison's commander, executed as a war criminal, is now exalted as a martyr and hero; and takes a marathon trek from Antietam to Gettysburg to Appomattox in the company of an eccentric pilgrim. Written with Horwitz's signature blend of humor, history, and hard-nosed journalism, this book brings alive old battlefields and new ones--classrooms, courts, country bars--where the past and the present collide, often in explosive ways.--From publisher description.… (mere)
Medlem:graps
Titel:Confederates in the Attic: Dispatches from the Unfinished Civil War
Forfattere:Tony Horwitz
Info:Vintage (1999), Paperback, 432 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

Detaljer om værket

Confederates in the Attic: Dispatches from the Unfinished Civil War af Tony Horwitz

  1. 30
    Midnat i det gode og ondes have : roman af John Berendt (Leigh22)
    Leigh22: Different subject matter but it tells the story of the new South using anecdotes and speckled with Southern history trivia.
  2. 30
    Them: Adventures with Extremists af Jon Ronson (lquilter)
    lquilter: Jon Ronson's "Them" and Tony Horwitz's "Confederates in the Attic" both offer wry, personal observations of cultures, not their own, often derided by others.
  3. 10
    Midnight Rising: John Brown and the Raid That Sparked the Civil War af Tony Horwitz (John_Vaughan)
  4. 10
    Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory af David W. Blight (Anonym bruger)
  5. 10
    Have a Nice Doomsday: Why Millions of Americans Are Looking Forward to the End of the World af Nicholas Guyatt (infiniteletters)
  6. 00
    The Whites of Their Eyes: The Tea Party's Revolution and the Battle over American History af Jill Lepore (Othemts)
  7. 00
    A Voyage Long and Strange: Rediscovering the New World af Tony Horwitz (John_Vaughan)
  8. 00
    Elvis Presley Boulevard: From Sea to Shining Sea, Almost (Traveler) af Mark Winegardner (amyblue)
  9. 00
    Ghost Riders af Sharyn McCrumb (myshelves)
    myshelves: Novel. The ghosts of those who fought the bitter neighbor-against-neighbor battles of the Civil War in isolated areas where loyalties were divided have not been laid to rest.
  10. 00
    Blue Latitudes: Boldly Going Where Captain Cook Has Gone Before af Tony Horwitz (John_Vaughan)
Indlæser...

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» Se også 302 omtaler

Viser 1-5 af 69 (næste | vis alle)
Horwitz embarked on an odyssey soon after returning to his native U.S. after many years as a foreign correspondent, often in war zones. A chance encounter with Civil War reenactors outside the rural home he shared with his Australian bride rekindles a childhood obsession. It is not his alone, of course. No other event in our history exercises such an emotional hold on our imagination. In this book, he reports on his investigation of this hold.
In the course of his fifteen-month journey, he takes to the field with these reenactors at Shiloh and Gettysburg, as well as exploring sites on his own, both well-known and obscure. His curiosity leads to encounters with a memorable assortment of people, keepers of the flame.
Along the way, he makes the disturbing discovery that in recent years (he wrote in the nineties, the trend he detected has grown in the intervening decades) that the wounds have become more raw.
Horwitz laments the lack of common ground, of a way for Americans to discuss a shared history. His reporting suggests one reason for this. Many of those he met were hazy on the facts. They knew little of what actually happened, and much of what they thought they knew was false. It seems as if this invocation of the war has less to do with what transpired than with the alienation of millions left behind in the rapid transformations in society in our time. The war has become an emblem, a shorthand for grievance.
Like the author, I went through a Civil War obsession that coincided with the sesquicentennial of the war. Unlike him, many of my ancestors fought in it, and joined the Klan after they lost. The name I use for the conflict is the one I learned attending school in the north. It’s symptomatic that it bears another name in the south, where my mother was born. Our biannual visits to her home exposed me to the enduring memory of roadside markers commemorating the smallest of skirmishes and the monumental statue of a Confederate soldier in front of the county courthouse. Fittingly for the dirt-poor area, it was not a steed-mounted general with drawn sword, but common soldier, a “poor man fighting a rich man’s war,” as some of Horwitz’s contacts, less-enamored with Lost Cause propaganda, put it.
Those visits were long ago, before the hardening of attitudes reported by Horwitz. For me, attending school in one region and having close family ties in the other was an early education in knowing that there is more than one side to any issue, and that it helps to look at both dispassionately. That seems to be a trait that ever fewer Americans cherish. Reading this book in the early months of election year 2016 was a sad experience, but I highly recommend it. ( )
  HenrySt123 | Jul 19, 2021 |
adult nonfiction, American culture in the south. Attempts to shed light on what the civil war, confederate spirit, and the confederate flag mean to different groups, from both African-American and white populations in different southern cities. Most amusing are the anecdotes relating to the hard-core confederate reenactors (preferring the all-day marching, sleeping in ditches, eating weevil-infested hardtack to the actual fighting scenes). ( )
  reader1009 | Jul 3, 2021 |
Full of racism and hate, as you would probably expect. Nonetheless, Horwitz manages to keep his tone light and the book is always readable (if a bit too long).

> Nor had the battle much altered the terrain. In 1862 generals still hewed to Napoleonic tactics; they thought trench-digging would demoralize troops and discourage them from going on the offensive

> First Manassas was also the first battle where North and South adopted the annoying habit of calling the same engagement by different names. Southerners tended to name battles after nearby towns—hence, Manassas—while Northerners chose geographic features, usually a body of water: hence Bull Run, the stream on whose banks the fight began. This rule also prevailed at Sharpsburg (known to Northerners as Antietam, after a creek near the town) and Murfreesboro (Stones River), though not at Shiloh, which the South named for a log church, while Northerners originally referred to the battle as Pittsburg Landing, after a nearby docking place. Go figure.

> Petersburg’s apartheid was so profound that graduates of the first integrated class at the city’s main public high school had recently held two twenty-fifth reunions: one for whites, one for blacks. Steve, who had moved to Petersburg straight after law school, planned to flee as soon as he could land a job elsewhere. “This is the anus of the South,” he said.

> There were also posts delineating the “deadline,” a perimeter inside the stockade that no prisoner could cross without risking gunfire from the guard towers (this was also the origin of the modern newspaper phrase). ( )
  breic | Mar 30, 2021 |
Not bad at all. I just couldn't get into it. A few chapters on the topic were enough for me.
  JustZelma | Dec 20, 2020 |
From Novelist: A journalist leads readers on a journey through the Old South, tangling with the forces of white rage, rebel grit, and regional pride in places where the Civil War is more than a memory.
  mackfuma | Oct 17, 2020 |
Viser 1-5 af 69 (næste | vis alle)
Nostalgia tinges ''Confederates in the Attic'' but seldom. One of the ironies of this book is that Horwitz is clearly a deep-dyed peace seeker. His judiciously balanced sympathies make him uncomfortable at times, caught between two camps fighting over turf. He longs for roots in the land. What he has is roots in intellectual honesty.
tilføjet af John_Vaughan | RedigerNY Times, Roy Blount Jr (Jul 18, 1998)
 

» Tilføj andre forfattere (4 mulige)

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Tony Horwitzprimær forfatteralle udgaverberegnet
Addison, ArthurFortællermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
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Southerners are very strange about the war.

-- Shelby Foote
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To my father
who gave me the passion,
and to my mother
who gave me the paint
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In 1965, a century after Appomattox, the Civil War began for me at a musty apartment in New Haven, Connecticut.
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Propelled by his boyhood passion for the Civil War, Horwitz embarks on a search for places and people still held in thrall by America's greatest conflict. The result is an adventure into the soul of the unvanquished South, where the ghosts of the Lost Cause are resurrected through ritual and remembrance. He joins "hardcore" reenactors; witnesses Klan rallies and calls for race war; finds that Andersonville Prison's commander, executed as a war criminal, is now exalted as a martyr and hero; and takes a marathon trek from Antietam to Gettysburg to Appomattox in the company of an eccentric pilgrim. Written with Horwitz's signature blend of humor, history, and hard-nosed journalism, this book brings alive old battlefields and new ones--classrooms, courts, country bars--where the past and the present collide, often in explosive ways.--From publisher description.

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