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LaGuardia af Nnedi Okorafor
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LaGuardia (udgave 2019)

af Nnedi Okorafor (Forfatter)

Serier: LaGuardia (1-4)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
12010183,011 (3.93)8
"In an alternate world where aliens have integrated with society, pregnant Nigerian-American doctor Future Nwafor Chukwuebuka has just smuggled an illegal alien plant named Letme Live through LaGuardia International and Interstellar Airport... and that's not the only thing she's hiding. She and Letme become part of a community of human and alien immigrants; but as their crusade for equality continues and the birth of her child nears, Future -- and her entire world -- begins to change."-- "On a planet Earth bursting with integrated extraterrestrial life, Future Nwafor Chukwuebuka is running from Nigeria under mysterious conditions. She's five months pregnant, her fiance doesn't know she's left... and she's smuggling an illegal, sentient plant into New York."--Provided by publisher.… (mere)
Medlem:pppaaatttt
Titel:LaGuardia
Forfattere:Nnedi Okorafor (Forfatter)
Info:Berger Books (2019), 136 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

Work Information

LaGuardia af Nnedi Okorafor

Ingen
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» Se også 8 omtaler

Viser 1-5 af 10 (næste | vis alle)
Hugo 2020 Nominations (Best Graphic);

Stars: 3

I tried to go into this one without listening to my preconceived notions from having read Nnedi Okorafor's [b:The Night Masquerade|34386617|The Night Masquerade (Binti, #3)|Nnedi Okorafor|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1495725402l/34386617._SY75_.jpg|55477512] (which to read required me to the read the two before it at the same time last year, as well) & [b:Black Panther: Long Live the King|36673422|Black Panther Long Live the King|Nnedi Okorafor|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1526771280l/36673422._SY75_.jpg|58459948], which were both in the Hugo Nominations for 2019.

My opinion of Nnedi's writing seems to hold pretty much true at this point. I very much see the point of the immigrant/emigrant "alien" life open-border policy story, told side by side with poc main and tertiary characters, but the story just didn't move me. I wonder if it would have been better in print for me. The art was definitely not a problem.

I definitely feel the strong theme of the world's current focus on police brutality and xenophobia loudly in this book, where we see it excised on aliens (and cross-species/interracial) exchanges in the car checks, the airport lines, the hospital, and the workplace. While there was a lot of very on-point touching of topics, I feel like this story just rushed through them and made them fine shortly after. ( )
  wanderlustlover | Aug 21, 2021 |
I'm always on the lookout for new comics. I don't follow the industry particularly closely, so a lot of titles slipped my attention. But I kept hearing about Nnedi Okorafor's LaGuardia. It was part of Dark Horse Comics' Berger Books imprint, a line of titles spearheaded by Karen Berger of Vertigo Comics fame – an editor whose work I've adored. It was a sci-fi comic that imagined an alternate Earth where aliens had integrated themselves among humanity – a premise that's right up my alley. And it just won Eisner and Hugo Awards. So, I finally read it. And, man, it's good. While I wish it was a bit longer, LaGuardia is a superb read. Featuring gorgeous artwork and intriguing world-building, it's reflective of our current societal problems and a wildly captivating read.

LaGuardia follows Future, a heavily-pregnant Nigerian-American woman, who smuggles an alien plantform, Letme Live, out of Nigeria and into America to protect them from an ongoing war between various plantforms. Upon arriving at LaGuardia Airport, Future encounters an America that is both prejudiced against and hostile to alien life-forms – in addition to America's seemingly endless prejudice against people of color. Future returns to her grandmother's home and settles down in America with Letme Live. And from there, we witness America's descent into fear.

The rhetoric used against the aliens in LaGuardia is intentionally similar to that used against immigrants and people of color in America today. There are anti-alien protests, travel bans to and from countries with high alien populations, and various businesses and establishments with a strong anti-alien bias. I found this approach to alien immigration deeply fascinating and depressingly realistic. For as much as we'd like to think we'd welcome aliens with open arms, we wouldn't. Something like this is exactly what we'd do and it was fascinating to see a comic explorer that idea in such detail.

I would honestly read several more comics featuring Okorafor's alien politics. Her worldbuilding in LaGuardia was beyond fascinating; it's my favorite aspect of the story. She doesn't overwhelm with exposition; instead, she chooses to drop readers into this living and breathing world and have us piece together all that is happening. It's a great way to convey the exposition while getting audiences invested in the sociopolitical climate of the comic. I loved every piece of the conflict she provided even if I wanted more of it. I love science fiction politics, whether they're hopeful or whether they're bleak, and I loved what LaGuardia had to say about our current sociopolitical climate in America.

Unfortunately, I found the plot and most of the character development a bit less successful. Now, to be fair, the plot is intriguing enough, with there being a bit of a mystery involving why Future left Nigeria and her fiance, and what's going on with her child, but much of that gets rushed in the story's four issues. There's just not enough room in these issues to explore everything that Okorafor wants to, so some things get a bit rushed. There's not a great sense of the passage of time and a few subplots aren't explored anywhere near as thoroughly as I like – namely those involving some of the aliens Future's grandmother houses and the one involving Citizen, Future's fiance. The same is true for much of the character work. Future's arc is solid, but almost everyone else also suffers from this lack of time with which to develop them. Now, neither of these problems comes close to ruining the comic. I thoroughly enjoyed reading it and I found its message powerful and its world so interesting and well-built that these problems registered as mere speed bumps – but they're worth mentioning. With a few extra issues, I think they could have been solved. But such is life.

The artwork, drawn by Tana Ford and colored by James Devlin, is beautiful. Ford creates an engaging world that's a perfect blend of alien and familiar. Locales are immediately recognizable and the alien design is as varied as human life is. Her artwork makes Okorafor's world feel as alive as it reads. Devlin's colors are the final piece of this puzzle. The colors are vibrant and pop off the page, imbuing Ford's art with that final breath of life. Combined, the artwork is simply gorgeous. It deftly facilitates the understanding of the comic's story while being beautiful to behold.

Ultimately, LaGuardia is a great read. Its short issue count hurts it a little bit, limiting the room it has to fully develop its plot and characters, but the world created by Okorafor is one well worth visiting. It presents a mirror to our modern society, transplanting our current prejudices onto alien beings. At times, it is depressingly realistic, but there is an aura of hope that emanates throughout. LaGuardia is a must-read for all sci-fi and comic fans and is a delight from start to finish. ( )
  thoroughlyme | Apr 23, 2021 |
https://nwhyte.livejournal.com/3427712.html

Aliens have landed some time ago; some of the countries of the world are adapting well to integrating this new source of diversity, others are not, and our pregnant heroine is navigating the human/alien encounter inside her own body as well as in her dealings with society in New York and Nigeria. Well done and realised. Slightly inconclusive. ( )
  nwhyte | Oct 7, 2020 |
This is an enjoyable graphic novel, and one that makes you think. There are definite parallels drawn between the near-future fictional world presented and our modern-day real world. I especially appreciated Okorafor's notes at the end about how she came up with the concept for this story.

Also, I got a bit of a Nigerian history lesson with this graphic novel. Parts of it were in the text, but other parts I looked up myself afterward because I knew nothing about the Nigerian-Biafran War. I always appreciate when fiction teaches me something about the real world. ( )
  ca.bookwyrm | Aug 5, 2020 |
I moderately enjoyed this, which places it in the upper tier of Okorafor books I've read. It's an obvious riff on Trump-era immigration politics, where it's aliens who have trouble immigrating into a xenophobic United States. I think a good sfnal take on a contemporary issue will make you think about it in a new way; this, however, didn't really make me realize anything that I didn't already know. It's fun, but ultimately shallow. I felt it suffered because the character work seemed very rush-- key emotional truths about the characters are just kind of tossed off, and as a result, the ending doesn't land with the punch that it wants to. I had sort of a mixed reaction to Tana Ford's art, which I realized when I read the backmatter might be down to the inking (which she does herself) and/or the coloring (by James Devlin). I found her pencils more expressive and organic.
  Stevil2001 | May 18, 2020 |
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» Tilføj andre forfattere (1 mulig)

Forfatter navnRolleHvilken slags forfatterVærk?Status
Nnedi Okoraforprimær forfatteralle udgaverberegnet
Devlin, JamesColouristhovedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Ford, TanaIllustratorhovedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Cipriano, SalLetterermedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet

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LaGuardia (1-4)

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Oprindelig udgivelsesdato
Personer/Figurer
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To all the extraterrestrials who have come, are currently here, and will arrive. Including my cat Periwinkle Chukwu. You are welcome. And to my daughter Anyaugo, who read and loved this story first. - Nnedi Okorafor
For Kirsten - Who listens and loves, and reminds me to water the garden. - Tana Ford
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Leavers Guide Introduction
So you have decided to leave Naija. OK, o. No problem. We will not stop you.
Citater
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Ingen

"In an alternate world where aliens have integrated with society, pregnant Nigerian-American doctor Future Nwafor Chukwuebuka has just smuggled an illegal alien plant named Letme Live through LaGuardia International and Interstellar Airport... and that's not the only thing she's hiding. She and Letme become part of a community of human and alien immigrants; but as their crusade for equality continues and the birth of her child nears, Future -- and her entire world -- begins to change."-- "On a planet Earth bursting with integrated extraterrestrial life, Future Nwafor Chukwuebuka is running from Nigeria under mysterious conditions. She's five months pregnant, her fiance doesn't know she's left... and she's smuggling an illegal, sentient plant into New York."--Provided by publisher.

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