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Henry's Freedom Box

af Ellen Levine

Andre forfattere: Kadir Nelson (Illustrator)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
2,8014633,608 (4.5)21
A fictionalized account of how in 1849 a Virginia slave, Henry "Box" Brown, escapes to freedom by shipping himself in a wooden crate from Richmond to Philadelphia.
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» Se også 21 omtaler

Viser 1-5 af 462 (næste | vis alle)
Course evaluation:

Personal Response: I loved this simple, yet powerful story. The images are haunting and show the sadness that Henry feels throughout his life. It is appropriate for any age level, yet an ideal story to introduce young readers to slavery and the Underground Railroad.

Evaluation: The content of this story will appeal to all age groups, but is particularly appropriate for early elementary readers; children will immediately relate to Henry, shown in the first few pages with his mother and reflecting on not having a birthday. The plot is moves at a steady pace, but the Levine also makes use of symbolism and detailed description throughout the story. Nelson’s illustrations reflect the somber mood of the story, using muted, rich tones and casting a shadow over Henry’s face for most of the story. The images are reproductions of the original lithograph of Henry Brown, evoking the historic setting and making each scene feel more authentic. ( )
  JustZelma | Dec 20, 2020 |
Historical Fiction- Life as a slave- Escape from Slavery

Henry was a slave who was sold from his mother and father to a new master. While working for his new master he married and had 3 children. One day while he was at work, his wife and 3 children got sold to someone else and he would never see them again. With the help of a friend and town doctor, he mailed himself to Pennsylvania in a box. When he arrived he finally had a birthday of freedom, as slaves do not know their actual birthdays. He was also finally given a middle name. He was now known as Henry Box Brown.

I thought this book was so sad how his family was sold away from him and he literally had to mail himself to escape slavery. This book would help students to see how terrible of a time this was, and things they had to do to live and the fact that they had very very little freedoms.
  KelcieBailey | Oct 30, 2020 |
Award Winning Book: Caldecott Medal! This historical fiction and picture book is a must read! This story is tale like nothing before. It is a journey of a young boy who is also a slave that doesn't know anything about himself except that he wants to be free. He ends up mailing himself hopefully to freedom. This sweet story will leave students with multiple feelings of sadness, heartache, understanding, empathy, hope, inspiration, and love. This book brings to light some of the historical facts regarding slavery and the conditions in which they lived, such as never even knowing how old you are because nobody really cared. This story should definitely be read to students when discussing equality, Black History Month, Martin Luther King and Harriet Tubman. This book will be a story that students will be able to discuss their thoughts, opinions, and share ideas of how we can even make this world a better place yet.
  katieronning | Jul 19, 2020 |
"Henry's Freedom Box" by Ellen Levine and illustrated by Kadir Nelson is a powerful non-fictional story about an African American man, Henry Brown, and his unfortunately real-life experience. The story takes place in the United States and Henry Freedom is born into slavery and endures every hardship that came with slavery in America. After Henry losses his family he makes the courageous decision to mail himself in a wooden box to freedom in the north. It is so crucial to use and show students work by African American artists as well as stories about America's ugly and disgraceful history, no matter what the demographic of your students. I enjoyed this story as the author delivered the powerful life of Henry Brown clearly and concisely and the illustrations by Kadir Nelson only add to the story. I am excited to use this book, over and over again in my future classroom. ( )
  JAdair1 | May 12, 2020 |
This book is another one of the inspirational stories I read this semester. It does a great job telling how someone can always get to where they want to be, no matter their situation. Henry even got out of his situation by putting himself in a box to be shipped. ( )
  Dscruggs24 | Apr 27, 2020 |
Viser 1-5 af 462 (næste | vis alle)
Levine (Freedom's Children) recounts the true story of Henry Brown, a slave who mailed himself to freedom. Thanks to Nelson's (Ellington Was Not a Street) penetrating portraits, readers will feel as if they can experience Henry's thoughts and feelings as he matures through unthinkable adversity. As a boy, separated from his mother, he goes to work in his new master's tobacco factory and eventually meets and marries another slave, with whom he has three children. In a heartwrenching scene depicted in a dramatically shaded pencil, watercolor and oil illustration, Henry watches as his family—suddenly sold in the slave market—disappears down the road. Henry then enlists the help of an abolitionist doctor and mails himself in a wooden crate "to a place where there are no slaves!" He travels by horse-drawn cart, steamboat and train before his box is delivered to the Philadelphia address of the doctor's friends on March 30, 1849. Alongside Henry's anguished thoughts en route, Nelson's clever cutaway images reveal the man in his cramped quarters (at times upside-down). A concluding note provides answers to questions that readers may wish had been integrated into the story line, such as where did Henry begin his journey? (Richmond, Va.); how long did it take? (27 hours). Readers never learn about Henry's life as a free man—or, perhaps unavoidably, whether he was ever reunited with his family. Still, these powerful illustrations will make readers feel as if they have gained insight into a resourceful man and his extraordinary story. Ages 4-8. (Jan.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

tilføjet af sriches | RedigerPublisher's Weekly, Reed Business Information
 

Gr 2–5—Inspired by an actual 1830s lithograph, this beautifully crafted picture book briefly relates the story of Henry "Box" Brown's daring escape from slavery. Torn from his mother as a child, and then forcibly separated from his wife and children as an adult, a heartsick and desperate Brown conspired with abolitionists and successfully traveled north to Philadelphia in a packing crate. His journey took just over one full day, during which he was often sideways or upside down in a wooden crate large enough to hold him, but small enough not to betray its contents. The story ends with a reimagining of the lithograph that inspired it, in which Henry Brown emerges from his unhappy confinement—in every sense of the word—and smiles upon his arrival in a comfortable Pennsylvania parlor. Particularly considering the broad scope of Levine's otherwise well-written story, some of the ancillary "facts" related in her text are unnecessarily dubious; reports vary, for instance, as to whether the man who sealed Henry into the crate was a doctor or a cobbler. And, while the text places Henry's arrival on March 30, other sources claim March 24 or 25. Nelson's illustrations, always powerful and nuanced, depict the evolution of a self-possessed child into a determined and fearless young man. While some of the specifics are unfortunately questionable, this book solidly conveys the generalities of Henry Brown's story.—Catherine Threadgill, Charleston County Public Library, SC
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
tilføjet af sriches | RedigerSchool Library Journal, Catherine Threadgill
 

» Tilføj andre forfattere (7 mulige)

Forfatter navnRolleHvilken slags forfatterVærk?Status
Ellen Levineprimær forfatteralle udgaverberegnet
Nelson, KadirIllustratormedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet

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A fictionalized account of how in 1849 a Virginia slave, Henry "Box" Brown, escapes to freedom by shipping himself in a wooden crate from Richmond to Philadelphia.

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