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Walking a Sacred Path: Rediscovering the…
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Walking a Sacred Path: Rediscovering the Labyrinth (udgave 1996)

af Lauren Artress

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
502336,061 (3.83)1
'Walking the Labyrinth' has re-emerged today as a metaphor for the spiritual journey and a powerful tool for transformation. This walking meditation is an archetype, a mystical ritual found in all religious traditions. It quiets the mind and opens the soul. Walking a Sacred Path explores the historical origins of this divine imprint and shares the discoveries of modern day seekers. It shows readers the potential of the labyrinth to inspire change and renewal, and serves as a guide to help us develop the higher level of human awareness readers need to survive in this century.… (mere)
Medlem:Firstplymouth
Titel:Walking a Sacred Path: Rediscovering the Labyrinth
Forfattere:Lauren Artress
Info:Riverhead Trade (1996), Paperback, 224 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
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Nøgleord:Ingen

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Walking a Sacred Path: Rediscovering the Labyrinth af Lauren Artress

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Viser 3 af 3
This book shows the potential to inspire change and renewal and guides the reader towards a higher level of human awareness.
  LibraryPAH | Jun 12, 2019 |
Good overview of the origins and state of the modern grassroots labyrinth movement, with many ideas on how to use the labyrinth as a tool for personal spiritual growth and community building. TIP: The author occasionally quotes a passage without citing the author in the text. The citations are in the Notes section at the back of the book. I was annoyed that the book has no index. ( )
  dunyazade | Sep 11, 2009 |
#44, 2006

This is a wonderful book, which I found to be filled with all sorts of spiritual wisdom. Artress gives a good overview of the benefits that can be had by labyrinth walking, and using the labyrinth as a tool or “blueprint” for tapping into your inner wisdom, and connecting with divine wisdom, as well. (Although I do agree with the previous reviewer that the book is light on historical information and details of sacred geometry; and I myself was put off by the focus being almost entirely on one type of labyrinth, with little mention of others. So if these were the things the reader went in hoping to find, I can fully understand her disappointment).

What I liked best about the book, though, was reading Artress’ general ideas about spirituality, religion, and self-development. As I was reading, I came across gem after gem that made me think, “Yes!” or, “Oh, I GET it now.” Her worldview and vision of the Divine is closely aligned to my own; something I found surprising, since she is a member of Christian clergy (and yes, I have some “issues” with what that has meant to me in the past). If I’d known someone like her in my youth, though, and been offered a vision like hers of what Christianity can be, perhaps I wouldn’t have turned away from the church at a young age.

For me her central topic is the paradigm shift that happened after the Middle Ages, when human society (at least in the West) switched focus to a “scientific” view of the world, with belief in only what can be seen, touched, and measured by the rational mind. When the invisible and mystical were no longer valued, this stripped most people of the ability to relate to the Divine in a great number of meaningful ways, and the ways the church responded to this did more harm than help, leading to the rather dark and dire times in which we find ourselves living today. Artress feels that by coming back to an acceptance of the mystical (wih the labyrinth being a powerful tool for doing this), humankind can begin to find the healing we so desperately need for ourselves, our fellow beings, and our world. Also, while she writes the book primarily referencing the Christian church, she makes it clear that the labyrinth can be used by people of all traditions and belief systems.

As I said, I think the most powerful aspects of this book for me had little to do with labyrinths, or walking them, but just her overview of spirituality. I’m now reading her new book, which is a workbook about various specific ways of using the labyrinth, and I’m interested to see how (or if) her approach has shifted during the eleven years between books. I would highly recommend this book to anyone who is interested in an introduction to the labyrinth, and also to people who are interested in what I’d consider to be progressive ideas about spirituality.

Oh, and I think it’s also worth mentioning that Artress is affliliated with Grace Cathedral in San Francisco, a church I have visited (although I have not had the opportunity to walk any of the labyrinths there – yet. I plan to make the effort to do that sometime this summer). Perhaps this was part of the reason I connected so strongly with the author – she feels more “accessible” to me than many other authors (as there’s a chance I could walk into the church one day and actually be able to speak with her). She’s also helped to inspire me with the labyrinth project I’m doing at my son’s school (a week from tomorrow, the children will be able to walk it for the first time).

I truly enjoyed this book. I found it meaningful and powerful, and would not hesitate in recommending it to others. I also intend to keep this one in my own library, as I’m sure I’ll want to refer to it again in the future.

LJ Discussion ( )
  herebedragons | Jan 14, 2007 |
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'Walking the Labyrinth' has re-emerged today as a metaphor for the spiritual journey and a powerful tool for transformation. This walking meditation is an archetype, a mystical ritual found in all religious traditions. It quiets the mind and opens the soul. Walking a Sacred Path explores the historical origins of this divine imprint and shares the discoveries of modern day seekers. It shows readers the potential of the labyrinth to inspire change and renewal, and serves as a guide to help us develop the higher level of human awareness readers need to survive in this century.

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