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Stony the Road: Reconstruction, White…
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Stony the Road: Reconstruction, White Supremacy, and the Rise of Jim Crow (original 2019; udgave 2019)

af Henry Louis Gates Jr. (Forfatter)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
276673,123 (3.93)10
"A profound new rendering of the struggle by African-Americans for equality after the Civil War and the violent counter-revolution that resubjugated them, as seen through the prism of the war of images and ideas that have left an enduring racist stain on the American mind. The abolition of slavery in the aftermath of the Civil War is a familiar story, as is the civil rights revolution that transformed the nation after World War II. But the century in between remains a mystery: if emancipation sparked 'a new birth of freedom' in Lincoln's America, why was it necessary to march in Martin Luther King, Jr.'s America? In this new book, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., one of our leading chroniclers of the African-American experience, seeks to answer that question in a history that moves from the Reconstruction Era to the 'nadir' of the African-American experience under Jim Crow, through to World War I and the Harlem Renaissance. Through his close reading of the visual culture of this tragic era, Gates reveals the many faces of Jim Crow and how, together, they reinforced a stark color line between white and black Americans. Bringing a lifetime of wisdom to bear as a scholar, filmmaker, and public intellectual, Gates uncovers the roots of structural racism in our own time, while showing how African Americans after slavery combatted it by articulating a vision of a "New Negro" to force the nation to recognize their humanity and unique contributions to America as it hurtled toward the modern age. The book will be accompanied by a new PBS documentary series on the same topic, with full promotional support from PBS"--… (mere)
Medlem:jlouise352
Titel:Stony the Road: Reconstruction, White Supremacy, and the Rise of Jim Crow
Forfattere:Henry Louis Gates Jr. (Forfatter)
Info:Penguin Press (2019), Edition: 1st Edition, 320 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

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Stony the Road: Reconstruction, White Supremacy, and the Rise of Jim Crow af Henry Louis Gates Jr. (2019)

Nyligt tilføjet afRKMJ, aezull, rchall78, 100sheets, Keith.94928, privat bibliotek, amcheri, potenza, tlwright
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Difficult but important read. ( )
  aezull | Jun 14, 2021 |
A profound new rendering of the struggle by African-Americans for equality after the Civil War and the violent counter-revolution that resubjugated them, as seen through the prism of the war of images and ideas that have left an enduring racist stain on the American mind.~Book Browse
  stlukeschurch | Mar 10, 2021 |
this is chock full of information and an excellent reference to keep for the future. i'm sure that i'll look back at it to refresh my memory about certain events or people, or for the historical illustrations. there is really a lot of information here.

as a book to read, it's quite academic and tough to get through. i think, in fact, that it probably loses some of the audience who can benefit from this information. i'll need to work through it again to make sure i didn't miss stuff and to remind myself of what i'm sure i've already forgotten.

"Being an advocate of the abolition of slavery was not the same thing as being a proponent of the fundamental equality of black and white people, or the unity of the human species..., to say nothing of equal citizenship rights and equal protection under the law."

"After all, when the smoke cleared after Lee's surrender at Appomattox, cotton still had to be picked, and the Negro's labor had to be exploited as ruthlessly and as effectively as possible. Any expectation of "equal rights" or "equal protection of the law" had to be obliterated, and the massive potential of the black male vote in key Southern states thwarted, if the old order of a slave-based Confederate society was to be reestablished as seamlessly as possible." ( )
  overlycriticalelisa | Mar 4, 2021 |
The day I finished this book, I read a news story about an effort to interpret one of the Reconstruction acts to favor a corporation over communities of African-Americans, bringing home the message of Gates's book: African-Americans have had to struggle throughout their history, but particularly since the end of the Civil War, against white supremacist and racist acts, images and words which seek to keep them subordinate not only to whites but to corporate needs. Some of the impact, a large part of the impact, for me was in the images Gates has collected to illustrate how white Americans have consistently denied humanity to African-Americans. I had not realized how pervasive this was throughout our shared history. ( )
  nmele | Sep 5, 2019 |
Skip Gates does not right dispassionately about the subject of Reconstruction and its subsequent overthrow in the 1870's, but he does paint a vivid picture of life under Jim Crow and how racial prejudice became institutionalized in this country.
Reconstruction came immediately after the end of the Civil War when the South was divided into several military districts and occupied by the Union Army. In this brief period (1865-1877) the former slaves were admitted to schools, given the vote and in many states, elected to Congress. Unfortunately, with the Panic of 1873, many in the northern states turned their focus away from the newly freed slaves to more pressing economic matters and in 1877, in order to end a standoff in the presidential election of 1876, Reconstruction ended.

Southern Democrats’ promises to protect civil and political rights of blacks were not kept, and the end of federal interference in southern affairs led to widespread disenfranchisement of blacks voters. From the late 1870's onward, southern legislatures passed a series of laws requiring the separation of whites from “persons of color” on public transportation, in schools, parks, restaurants, theaters and other locations. Known as the “Jim Crow laws” (after a popular minstrel act developed in the antebellum years), these segregationist statutes governed life in the South through the middle of the next century, ending only after the hard-won successes of the civil rights movement in the 1960's.

The South also developed the myth of the "Lost Cause" to justify Jim Crow. The Lost Cause myth was based on two falsehoods. First, that the Civil War was not an act of treason but rather a revolt against an overreaching federal government and second that slavery did not start the war

Since the white power structure realized that the freed slaves' ultimate power would be achieved through their exercise of their right to vote, every effort was made to suppress that right. At least 10% of the black members of constitutional conventions in the South in 1867-8 became victims of Klan violence, including 7 who were murdered. Likewise the South Carolina legislature closed the newly integrated University in 1876 and re-opened it in 1880 as a segregated institution. And of course the promised Redistribution of land never happened.

Jim Crow legislation that was quickly passed in the 1880's did not occur in a vacuum. It was bolstered by the ideology of white supremacy that developed in order to maintain the country's racial hierarchy in the face of emancipation and black citizenship, White power enforced through the nation's cultural, economic, educational, legal and violently extra-legal systems, including lynching. At its core were the paired myths of white women's rape and black men's brutality, the convict lease system, disenfranchisement, and the chocking off of access to capital and property ownership. Added all together and these produced the self-fulfilling prophecies of racial stereotypes that are still held in wide belief today.

The racial mythology produced seven basic African-American stereotypes:
:
• The Contented Slave
• the Brute Negro
• the Wretched Freedman
• the Comic Negro
• the Tragic Mulatto
• the Local Color Negro
• the Exotic Primitive

These stereotypes ere supported by racial "science" that "proved" fundamental biological differences between black people and white people. These "differences" gave credence to the argument for legal segregation. To prove that the Negroes were happy as slaves and hopelessly unequipped for freedom. The Negro was established as a contented slave, entertaining child and docile ward until misled by "radical agitators," when he became a dangerous beast.

The educated African American tried to counteract these stereotypes by adopting Booker T. Washington's theory of the "New Negro" - : Middle class, educated & respectable. Of course, while some of these African Americans became successful through this reinvention of themselves, they never pleased the hardcore racists who were never going to accept any black person, no matter how refined. And neither did the "New Negro" please activists in the black community. As early as 1910, The Chicago Defender wrote " those who represent that young progressive class, that class that represent our colleges, that class that represents our business and professional side; but they are the class that the South is preparing to raise a monument to, the 'Good Nigger,' the Uncle Tom class."

It would take until 100 years after the end of the Civil War for Southern blacks to gain their right to vote as well as the right to equal access in public accommodations. And yet, fifty years after that landmark legislation, we see efforts once again to suppress their vote.

I'd advise everyone to read this book and just think about how your own thoughts and actions have been affected by the reaction to Reconstruction. ( )
1 stem etxgardener | Jun 23, 2019 |
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"A profound new rendering of the struggle by African-Americans for equality after the Civil War and the violent counter-revolution that resubjugated them, as seen through the prism of the war of images and ideas that have left an enduring racist stain on the American mind. The abolition of slavery in the aftermath of the Civil War is a familiar story, as is the civil rights revolution that transformed the nation after World War II. But the century in between remains a mystery: if emancipation sparked 'a new birth of freedom' in Lincoln's America, why was it necessary to march in Martin Luther King, Jr.'s America? In this new book, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., one of our leading chroniclers of the African-American experience, seeks to answer that question in a history that moves from the Reconstruction Era to the 'nadir' of the African-American experience under Jim Crow, through to World War I and the Harlem Renaissance. Through his close reading of the visual culture of this tragic era, Gates reveals the many faces of Jim Crow and how, together, they reinforced a stark color line between white and black Americans. Bringing a lifetime of wisdom to bear as a scholar, filmmaker, and public intellectual, Gates uncovers the roots of structural racism in our own time, while showing how African Americans after slavery combatted it by articulating a vision of a "New Negro" to force the nation to recognize their humanity and unique contributions to America as it hurtled toward the modern age. The book will be accompanied by a new PBS documentary series on the same topic, with full promotional support from PBS"--

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