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Hype : a doctor's guide to medical…
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Hype : a doctor's guide to medical myths, exaggerated claims and bad… (udgave 2018)

af Nina Shapiro, Kristin Loberg (Author.)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingSamtaler
263705,391 (3.5)Ingen
"There is a lot of misinformation thrown around these days, especially online. Headlines tell us to do this, not that--all in the name of living longer, better, thinner, younger. In Hype, Dr. Nina Shapiro distinguishes between the falsehoods and the evidence-backed truth. In her work at Harvard and UCLA, with more than twenty years of experience in both clinical and academic medicine, she helps patients make important health decisions everyday. She's bringing those lessons to life here with a blend of science and personal stories to discuss her dramatic new definition of "a healthy life." Hype covers everything from exercise to supplements, diets to detoxes, alternative medicine to vaccines, and medical testing to media coverage. Shapiro tackles popular misconceptions such as toxic sugar and the importance of drinking eight glasses of water a day. She provides simple solutions anyone can implement, such as worrying less about buying products labeled organic or natural, and more about skipping vaccines, buying into weight-loss fads, and thinking you can treat cancer through diet alone. This book is as much for single individuals in the prime of their lives as it is for parents with young children and the elderly."--Amazon.com. There is a lot of misinformation thrown around these days, and Shapiro helps readers distinguish between the falsehoods and the evidence-backed truth. Using a blend of science and personal stories, she covers everything from exercise to supplements, diets to detoxes, and medical testing to media coverage, while also providing simple solutions anyone can implement.… (mere)
Medlem:TanteLeonie
Titel:Hype : a doctor's guide to medical myths, exaggerated claims and bad advice - how to tell what's real and what's not
Forfattere:Nina Shapiro
Andre forfattere:Kristin Loberg (Author.)
Info:New York : St. Martin's Press, [2018]
Samlinger:Read
Vurdering:***1/2
Nøgleord:health

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Hype: A Doctor's Guide to Medical Myths, Exaggerated Claims, and Bad Advice - How to Tell What's Real and What's Not af Nina Shapiro MD

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With daily doses of email, television, radio and the internet, we are all bombarded with information about medical studies, new medicines and supplements, herbal remedies, almost magical instant cures for everything from foot fungus to obesity, superfoods and dangerous carcinogens. How much of what pops up in our email inboxes, on television commercials and on websites is actually true? And how much is exaggerated, based on skewed data, and outright trickery? This morning alone I woke up to 10 emails about medical and health related subjects ranging from herbal supplements and weight loss to cancer prevention and hair loss. Most were trying to sell me something and others provided links to various websites. It's really hard to rake through all the muck and pick out the factual information, if any. And I get really concerned when I see television ads for new "breakthrough" medications that require almost a minute of disclaimers at the end about it may cause suicidal thoughts, seizures, cancer and a host of other horrible side effects. What is true....and what's BS or media hype?

Nina Shapiro is a surgeon. After working in the medical field for decades, Shapiro has concerns about medical misinformation that most people come across on a daily basis and the potentially dangerous consequences of self-diagnosing illnesses based on misleading, incomplete or exaggerated information. This book seeks to provide a common sense approach for the average person to learn to separate fact from fiction. Shapiro discusses what certain terms like clinical study and scientific study mean, how companies get survey information so they can say their products are "doctor recommended,'' the exaggerated benefits of supplements, how to tell bogus study data from scientific data, the dangers of self diagnosis using unreliable information, benefits and concerns about alternative medicine, and the origins of several myths largely touted as true (like vaccinations supposedly causing autism).

I enjoyed reading this book. Shapiro introduces herself and gives credibility to her opinions by talking about her experiences as a surgeon and her career. Then she gives common sense approaches to wading through all the information readily at our fingertips in today's modern, internet-centric society. She doesn't just point out fallacies believed by ordinary people, but also talks about myths and other beliefs that doctors held as true that had to be disproved by scientific evidence (like red haired people have more problems during and after surgery). We all have been duped by product advertisements, false or misleading information backed by skewed studies and read articles printed by bogus medical journals. I enjoyed reading a book that points out common sense ways to tell truth from fiction, and firm facts from weak correlations. The book is written in easy to understand language with a conversational tone. I found the information interesting and very informative.

**I voluntarily read an advance readers copy of this book from St Martin's Press via NetGalley. All opinions expressed are entirely my own.** ( )
  JuliW | Nov 22, 2020 |
I read this after hearing about it in a Sam Harris podcast with the author. I skimmed it, so don’t consider this a complete review.

When I evaluate a health book, I look at a few litmus issues to decide whether to dig deeper. On one of these, GMO safety, the author is too equivocal, stating "There remains no consensus on GMO safety” and repeating the standard anti-GMO argument about pesticides. She didn’t do enough homework here.

My second litmus is about the microbiome, of which she says little other than that it is “bound to be a game-changer”.

Bottom line: although it’s well-written and reasonable, there wasn’t enough originality to put it on my list of best health books. ( )
  richardSprague | Mar 22, 2020 |
The state of medicine is at best uncertain. We are warned that red wine contains sulfites (on every label), but two ounces of dried apricots contain six times as much. Coconut oil used to be heart-healthy, but no more. Doctors used to recommend no nuts until the age of two. Now they say the earlier the better. Except that they choke infants. Foods become superfoods – for a while. Fatty bran muffins used to be superfoods, for example. Doctors used to recommend smoking, and even appeared in ads. All kinds of useless products claim to be clinically tested and proven. UCLA surgeon and professor Dr. Nina Shapiro is here to straighten it out for you in an encyclopedic tour of her world that she calls Hype.

The book divides easily into lifestyle segments, from foods to fads to surgery to exercise. The chapters list their main points up front, and their takeaways at the end. Very user-friendly.

Medicine is still very much in flux, but Shapiro can say with certainty what we should look out for, avoid, or do moderately. It’s one of those books where it’s pointless to use a highlighter, because the whole thing would be stained yellow and you’d never find anything.

Here are some of the things I want to remember:
-One in 1477 women’s lives is saved by mammograms. False positives put more through expensive and pointless torture.
-A baby aspirin a day for a minimum of five years may save one life in 2000. But can cause excessive bleeding in many others.
-.0000004% of vaccinations result in claims against the vaccination compensation fund.
-Vaccinations only work if the “herd” is protected. Depending on the disease, 80-90% need vaccinations or the disease will spread. Those who opt out put the whole community at risk – for nothing.
-Vitamins are a racket. We get more vitamins daily from our food than we require. Additional supplements do nothing, but possible harm. On the other hand, Shapiro says, the placebo effect is extremely powerful, even on her. So if you think taking vitamins helps, then they do. So keep taking them.
-Vitamin E doesn’t so much prevent cancer as cause it.
-Drinking eight glasses of water day on top of all the water you get from food can kill you.
-Homeopathy is ”an elaborate placebo system”. It has no way to cure anything – unless you believe and expect.
-Homeopathy for cancer is basically suicide. You want real surgery and heavy-duty meds to fight cancer.
-Sitting is the new smoking. It reduces calorie burn, increases bad cholesterol …. And standing all day is no better, just different. We need to move.
-Sugar is the new fat. We need fats. Sugar is killer.
-“Sweat does not contain BPA, pesticides, asbestos, pollutants or other ills we wish to flush out of our system.” Or burn calories.
-Don’t worry so much about toxic chemicals in everything. They are everywhere and not in sufficient quantity to cause damage. Until proven otherwise. (Which is the whole problem.)
-Be wary of bragging: Farm Fresh! No added sugar! Organic! Gluten-free! All Natural! What these actually mean is little or nothing. Fruit juice is just sugar water. With all the valuable fiber removed.
-Published studies are not to be believed. Headlines taken from them are often totally wrong when not just misleading. Every study has its weaknesses. There is no certainty.
-In western consumer societies, buying food is astonishingly complicated. Fraud permeates everything. Fake food abounds. Tune out the marketing and buy basics: raw, fresh and unprocessed. Then make it into whatever you want. (Shapiro however, still hits the vending machines.)
-Western doctors no longer look at patients. They are too busy keying in notes. Nor do they listen any more. They simply order tests. One of Shapiro’s mentors (wisely) says: if you would just listen to the patient, they will eventually tell you exactly what the issue is. (And you don’t have to go to the lab and wait a week.)

There is a lot of common sense and humanity in Hype. Shapiro has a swift and easy style, and likes to sneak the odd sarcastic comment in there too. She gives lots of examples from her own family and friends, as well as memorable cases. Unlike so many in the God business, she is accessible, clearheaded, and forthcoming. She doesn’t always follow her own advice, and owns up to it. If there is an overarching takeaway, it is moderation, as in: processed foods are no good for you, but they won’t kill you.

And eat more fish.

David Wineberg ( )
1 stem DavidWineberg | Apr 16, 2018 |
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"There is a lot of misinformation thrown around these days, especially online. Headlines tell us to do this, not that--all in the name of living longer, better, thinner, younger. In Hype, Dr. Nina Shapiro distinguishes between the falsehoods and the evidence-backed truth. In her work at Harvard and UCLA, with more than twenty years of experience in both clinical and academic medicine, she helps patients make important health decisions everyday. She's bringing those lessons to life here with a blend of science and personal stories to discuss her dramatic new definition of "a healthy life." Hype covers everything from exercise to supplements, diets to detoxes, alternative medicine to vaccines, and medical testing to media coverage. Shapiro tackles popular misconceptions such as toxic sugar and the importance of drinking eight glasses of water a day. She provides simple solutions anyone can implement, such as worrying less about buying products labeled organic or natural, and more about skipping vaccines, buying into weight-loss fads, and thinking you can treat cancer through diet alone. This book is as much for single individuals in the prime of their lives as it is for parents with young children and the elderly."--Amazon.com. There is a lot of misinformation thrown around these days, and Shapiro helps readers distinguish between the falsehoods and the evidence-backed truth. Using a blend of science and personal stories, she covers everything from exercise to supplements, diets to detoxes, and medical testing to media coverage, while also providing simple solutions anyone can implement.

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