HjemGrupperSnakUdforskZeitgeist
Søg På Websted
På dette site bruger vi cookies til at levere vores ydelser, forbedre performance, til analyseformål, og (hvis brugeren ikke er logget ind) til reklamer. Ved at bruge LibraryThing anerkender du at have læst og forstået vores vilkår og betingelser inklusive vores politik for håndtering af brugeroplysninger. Din brug af dette site og dets ydelser er underlagt disse vilkår og betingelser.
Hide this

Resultater fra Google Bøger

Klik på en miniature for at gå til Google Books

Daughter of a Daughter of a Queen: A Novel…
Indlæser...

Daughter of a Daughter of a Queen: A Novel (udgave 2018)

af Sarah Bird (Forfatter)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
17720123,112 (4.16)3
"The compelling, hidden story of Cathy Williams, a former slave and the first woman to ever serve in the US Army "Here's the first thing you need to know about Miss Cathy Williams: I am the daughter of a daughter of a queen and my Mama never let me forget it." Missouri, 1864 Powerful, epic, and compelling, Daughter of a Daughter of a Queen shines light on a nearly forgotten figure in history. Cathy Williams was born and lived a slave until the Union army comes and destroys the only world she's known. Separated from her family, she makes the impossible decision, to fight in the army disguised as a man with the Buffalo Soldiers. With courage and wit, Cathy must not only fight for her survival and freedom in the ultimate man's world, but never give up on her mission to find her family, and the man she loves. Beautiful, strong, and impactful, Cathy's story is one that illustrates the force of hidden history come to light, the strength of women, and the power of love"--… (mere)
Medlem:RandasLibrary
Titel:Daughter of a Daughter of a Queen: A Novel
Forfattere:Sarah Bird (Forfatter)
Info:St. Martin's Press (2018), 403 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

Work Information

Daughter of a Daughter of a Queen: A Novel af Sarah Bird

Indlæser...

Bliv medlem af LibraryThing for at finde ud af, om du vil kunne lide denne bog.

Der er ingen diskussionstråde på Snak om denne bog.

» Se også 3 omtaler

Viser 1-5 af 20 (næste | vis alle)
Progress update: I was absolutely loving this book...until characters went completely out of character in order to drive the inevitable romance forward with eye-rolling tropes. Now no one seems to care whether Cathy's caught out. Sigh. I should finish in a day or two. Full review to come then.

~~~

Full Review:

Well, I guess I probably set myself up for disappointment with this one. I just wanted so badly to love it, but in the end it fell into a bunch of corny romance-y tropes that just lost me--though I want to emphasize that said tropes are totally valid and may well be what others absolutely love, so if this sounds like a book you want to read, please don't let me deter you! It's definitely worth it, and I'm still glad I read it.

The writing style was absolutely beautiful, a perfect balance of dialect with the intelligence and wisdom that came from Cathy's upbringing with a remarkable family and an educated father from the North. I appreciated that Cathy never learned to read and write for herself--so often that's treated as a turning point for a character, and as a reader I do understand that, but literacy is also an immense privilege that not everyone can have, and it's important to see that illiteracy and a lack of formal education in no way takes from the worth and strength of remarkable people.

The historicity of people and events seems impeccable, though I don't know enough details about this time period (a big part of my attraction to the book) to know for sure. It seems a bit convenient that Cathy/Cathay's troop never had to actually hunt down and slaughter Native Americans, but at least there was still some discussion about the conflicting feelings some soldiers may have felt about their mission.

The book was suspenseful and agonizing in a way that many woman-disguised-as-a-man books are not. It seems that most of those books gloss over the realities of just how dangerous it was to be a woman in the past and the potentially brutal consequences if the character is caught. That agony of always being on the edge of discovery was palpable, and I was glad that my commuting time for reading gave me some breaks.

There was so much to love in the first two thirds of this book...but unfortunately it's time to get back to my disappointment. I can pinpoint the exact moment where everything went off the rails for my personal brand of enjoyment: page 282.

I'd resigned myself early to the fact that we *had* to have a love interest, because of *course* no woman is complete without a perfect man in her life. Cathy's quick bond with a dying soldier in the early pages of the book was believeable enough to me, someone who has made fast--if temporary--friends in unfamiliar new situations. I'd also kind of accepted that it might be possible for Cathy to have a major crush in spite of her constant anxiety about being found out, and to a few stupid actions in the name of love. I thought that Cathy's early, failed encounters with the love interest were realistic responses and well done, so I had hope for a more realistic ending.

Instead, oh boy. I'm going to get really specific with the spoilers here, so stop reading now if you have any interest in this book.


Starting with page 282 the romance tropes and stupid actions started piling on thick:
>> deathly-cold-and-only-body-heat-will-save-them
>> love-makes-her-beautiful
>> insta-love
>> randy-as-rabbits
>> sex-solves-(almost)-everything
>> bury-your-gays (I slightly forgave this one when my prediction that the love interest would die also came trueish)
>> romantic-partners-can't-have-platonic-friends
>> she's-suddenly-so-gullible
>> life's-not-worth-living-without-him

Everyone seemed out of character after this point. After years of saying that being thought gay was almost as bad as being caught a woman, suddenly Cathay doesn't much care who sees her sneaking off for a roll in the hay with another soldier. The level-headed, practical love interest is off his head careless. The black villain seemed like an idiot for basically knowing Cathay's secret but never outright saying it or demanding blackmail. The white villain was ludicrously, suicidally stupid (though given some of the stupid things people have done out west, I couldn't find this totally unbelievable). The third corner of the obligatory love triangle is suddenly happy for Cathay instead of jealous and sad (okay, I honestly thought that was refreshing!).

Everything became more predictable, too. Sure, I'd guessed some of the key romantic plot points--hard to avoid it when you've read as much as I have and when every. single. book. about a strong woman in history *has* to have a love interests--but suddenly I was plodding through every "twist" as inevitably as the Buffalo Soldiers plodded through the desert.

Then the ending felt rushed compared to so much else. After being highly, rightly suspicious of white men, Cathy just takes it without question that her love interest is dead. There was even that soppy line about learning each other's bodies completely, which turned out not to be true when it mattered most. There was no explanation for why Cathy chose not to go south into Mexico or west to San Francisco, either of which seemed more likely than going north into the States that had so failed every single black person. Again, I guessed the very last twist, and consequently the final chapter felt more trite than anything else, like a very clumsy attempt at an Atonement-type ending.

I realize this all sounds harsh. My only excuse, if it exists, is that I felt so let down by the final third after loving the first third so much, that the disappointment makes me more critical. Well, that and I tend to criticize the media that I either love or hate. Since I'm definitely not on the hate spectrum here, I think it's because I wish that last third had done the rest of the book justice.


Ah well. Let me say again that this book was well worth the read, no matter how annoyed I was during the last third of the book. I learned so much about the "contraband" slaves in the Civil War, the Buffalo Soldiers, and--of course--Cathy Williams. It was a privilege to read about her, even if it was fiction, and I'm glad I did so. I just wish her fictional self could have had less silly romance washing out the tough, never-quit attitude her character had for most of the book.

Quotes & Comments

I didn't take many quotes because I was enjoying the writing and snark so much that I knew I'd never stop once I started. Please read through page 281 1/2!

p. 207: Not a spoiler, but I was interested in Sergeant Allbright's theory of why slavery took off. He theorizes that it's because the presence of water meant bigger crops, which meant more laborers were needed. So out west in the desert, there was no need for slaves. It's an interesting idea, and one that probably only applies to the States, since there were plenty of nomadic, desert-dwelling Biblical slave-holding societies. Of course, Egypt does also fit the pattern. Still...makes me think.

p. 214: Okay, so Cathy's trick to show off Cathay's peeing powers has really been bothering me. Wouldn't the coffeepot spout have had ragged metal edges? Yikes! And how the heck would she know where to put the large end? Most women today don't know where the pee comes out, and that's with the benefit of mirrors to check out what's down there!

p. 296: The man-illusion-maintaining trick with Mary the Murderer seemed cruel to me. Mary hadn't done anything to hurt Cathy and she also wasn't white, so I was surprised that there was almost no description of sympathy or guilt for the way Cathy used her. Cathy is normally a very introspective character, so I would have expected some kind of pondering on the nature of redemption, once the immediate fear had passed.

p. 365: Kind of sadly ironic these days that crossing the Rio Grande into Mexico is the ticket to freedom here.

p. 375: Also not a spoiler, and the only quote: "The instant that doing the right thing became a financial advantage, the mob of curs turned righteous..." Yep, ain't that the state of the world. All these corporate diversity campaigns supporting gay rights and hiring athletes of color to represent them only once it presents more of a financial gain than a potential liability. Ugh. Cynical and feels true.

And finally, what is with that useless historical note? If there's hardly anything about Cathy, I want to know everything that we do know!

Anyway, this FINALLY concludes my review. Again, all the reasons this went from awesome to annoying for me may very well be the reasons why others would love this book. The first two third are worth it. Don't let me put you off! ( )
  books-n-pickles | Oct 29, 2021 |
Cathy Williams started life as a slave. But her mother never let her forget that she was the daughter of a daughter of an African queen. She was born in Missouri in the 1840s and worked as a slave in Little Dixie until a Union Army general came and burned the farm. Mistaking Cathy for a boy, the general took her to be a cook's assistant. Later, she posed as a boy again to join the Buffalo Soldiers and fought in the Civil War.

What a great book! Cathy is strong, brave and true to herself. She perseveres through intense hardship and the horrors of war. As an old woman she stands up to those who scoff at her to proudly tell her story. Lovely!

For me, this book was absolutely captivating. Cathy is such a strong main character and she goes through so much. She never let anything beat her down. I found this story disturbing because of the images of slavery, war and prejudice...but also quite empowering and uplifting. Cathy had one hell of a life because she never stopped living it like she was the granddaughter of a warrior. Beautiful and haunting story!

I loved this book. I am definitely going to read more by this author!

**I voluntarily read a review copy of this book from St. Martins Press via NetGalley. All opinions expressed are entirely my own.** ( )
  JuliW | Nov 22, 2020 |
This is great historical fiction based on an actual former slave, Cathy/Cathay Williams, the first woman to enlist in the peacetime U. S. Army (disguised as a man of course) after the Civil War, and the only one to ever serve with the Buffalo Soldiers. The real Cathy Williams disappears after 1892., which gives author Sarah Bird a lot of leeway with the story. Bahni Turpin brings Cathy (the narrator) to life in the audiobook edition. ( )
  riofriotex | Mar 31, 2020 |
I could not finish this one because I felt the whole thing was too predictable. This doesn’t mean it was a bad novel. Cathy is a kick-ass character, feisty and independent even when she knows such behavior could get her killed. I simply got tired of her bullish approach to everything because her behavior never changed. It is a perfectly decent piece of historical fiction that sheds some light on an unsung feminist hero.
  jmchshannon | Dec 28, 2019 |
This is astonishingly good. So good it makes me want to give up writing now because I will never write a novel this good. The protagonist/narrator is unforgettable, based on a real woman named Cathy Williams who was born into slavery, became General Philip Sheridan's cook during the Civil War, then enlisted in the Buffalo Soldiers - as a man named William Cathay. At the beginning, Cathy's voice seemed a touch too modern to me, but she quickly grew on me, and I was riveted all the way to the end. Bird pulls it off with panache, and Cathy's remarkable life justifies Bird's choices. Truly great historical fiction can take familiar settings and make them seem brand new, which is exactly what happens here as we see slavery, the Civil War, and the American West through Cathy's eyes. Highly, highly recommended, especially in audiobook format, not only for Bahni Turpin's always-stellar narration but for the half-hour interview with the author at the end. The forty-year saga of how Bird came to write this book is as amazing as the novel itself. ( )
  ElyseBell | May 25, 2019 |
Viser 1-5 af 20 (næste | vis alle)
ingen anmeldelser | tilføj en anmeldelse
Du bliver nødt til at logge ind for at redigere data i Almen Viden.
For mere hjælp se Almen Viden hjælpesiden.
Kanonisk titel
Originaltitel
Alternative titler
Oprindelig udgivelsesdato
Personer/Figurer
Vigtige steder
Vigtige begivenheder
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Beslægtede film
Priser og hædersbevisninger
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Indskrift
Tilegnelse
Første ord
Citater
Sidste ord
Oplysning om flertydighed
Forlagets redaktører
Bagsidecitater
Originalsprog
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

Henvisninger til dette værk andre steder.

Wikipedia på engelsk

Ingen

"The compelling, hidden story of Cathy Williams, a former slave and the first woman to ever serve in the US Army "Here's the first thing you need to know about Miss Cathy Williams: I am the daughter of a daughter of a queen and my Mama never let me forget it." Missouri, 1864 Powerful, epic, and compelling, Daughter of a Daughter of a Queen shines light on a nearly forgotten figure in history. Cathy Williams was born and lived a slave until the Union army comes and destroys the only world she's known. Separated from her family, she makes the impossible decision, to fight in the army disguised as a man with the Buffalo Soldiers. With courage and wit, Cathy must not only fight for her survival and freedom in the ultimate man's world, but never give up on her mission to find her family, and the man she loves. Beautiful, strong, and impactful, Cathy's story is one that illustrates the force of hidden history come to light, the strength of women, and the power of love"--

No library descriptions found.

Beskrivelse af bogen
Haiku-resume

LibraryThing-forfatter

Sarah Bird er LibraryThing-forfatter, en forfatter som har sit personlige bibliotek opført på LibraryThing.

profil side | forfatterside

Populære omslag

Quick Links

Vurdering

Gennemsnit: (4.16)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 4
3.5 2
4 18
4.5 3
5 12

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Brugerbetingelser/Håndtering af brugeroplysninger | Hjælp/FAQs | Blog | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterladte biblioteker | Tidlige Anmeldere | Almen Viden | 164,612,659 bøger! | Topbjælke: Altid synlig