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The Satires of Juvenal

af Decimus Iunius Iuvenalis

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This is a rhyming-couplet translation of Juvenal's sixteen Satires, written in iambic pentameters. While remaining faithful to the original, it brings the work of the first-century Roman poet to the attention of a contemporary audience. Though subject to the strictures of such a poetic form, it is an accurate rendering while at the same time keeping the mordant and sardonic tone of the original. It is accepted that classical texts need a new inspection every so often and this is an attempt to make Juvenal appeal to a contemporary readership. While it may well find a niche among professional cl… (mere)
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» Se også 17 omtaler

Engelsk (12)  Portugisisk (1)  Svensk (1)  Alle sprog (14)
Viser 1-5 af 14 (næste | vis alle)
4/26/22
  laplantelibrary | Apr 26, 2022 |
My overall thoughts on this book: old man shakes hand at clouds and writes angry letters to the newspaper about things he doesn't like.

It really is - Juvenal tends to ramble eloquently on a topic, generally on things he doesn't like (eg, gay folk are bad, but better to be a gay than married). And, his rants are mostly recognizable today (Don't spend money on stuff you can't afford. Outsiders bad and taking jobs and Romans aren't taking back what they are due, etc). A few topics are difficult to read (Satire 6, on woman). As a whole, I really enjoyed reading this.

On style - initially, I had trouble understanding what was happening. Between old traditions and the very English translation of this book, I had to read a few of the satires two or three times, just to catch the nuance. The translation is well done, as far as I can tell. However, I wish there was more focus on the overall setting in the notes. I don't care who Juvenal was writing about, but I really wanted to know about the setting, why were these written, and how were the presented. Bits and pieces of the why were covered in the book, but the majority of the notes were focused on sentence structure (which is meaningless to me) and on individuals mentioned. ( )
  TheDivineOomba | Jun 14, 2020 |
From the Urvater of Political Incorrectness: An equal opportunity hater. Brutal and brilliant.
  AstonishingChristina | Mar 4, 2018 |
Juvenal é um poeta romano famoso por suas sátiras indignadas. Escreveu 16 sátiras da vida em Roma, por volta de 100 dC, denunciando a imoralidade negligente e a criminosa tirania da sociedade circundante. Seu estilo é epigramático e seus versos frequentemente incorporados ao léxico. Entre os mais famosos:
(i) O Acaso pode, a seu bel prazer, tolos promover, / E lançá-los às rodas da Fortuna.
(ii) A gente que outrora concedeu comandos, consulados, legiões e tudo o mais, agora não mais se preocupa, e anseia sofregamente por apenas duas coisas - pão e circo!
(iii) Quem guardará os próprios guardas? (quis custodiet ipsos custodes?)
(iv) A paz não visita a mente culposa. (Nemo Malus Felix)
(v) Deves orar por uma mente sã num corpo são. ( )
  jgcorrea | May 10, 2016 |
I've long been sceptical of contemporary novels that are advertized as satires. Consider Jonathan Coe's 'Rotters' Club,' which was okay, but compared even to a supposedly realistic novel like 'The Line of Beauty,' contained little satire beyond its propensity for pointing out that people ate some really bad food in the seventies. So I finally got around to reading Juvenal, and my scepticism has been gloriously affirmed: yes, satire can be really, really mean; it can be full of almost explosive moral indignation.

'For what is disgrace if he keeps the money?'
'What can I do in Rome? I can't tell lies!'
'Of all that luckless poverty involves, nothing is harsher/ than the fact that it makes people funny.'
'A poor man's rights are confined to this:/ having been pounded and punched to a jelly, to beg and implore/ that he may be allowed to go home with a few teeth in his head.'
'When power which is virtually equal/ to that of the gods is flattered, there's nothing it can't believe.'
'You must know the color of your own bread.'
'that which is coated and warmed with so many odd preparations... what shall we call it? A face, or an ulcer?'
'If somebody owns a dwarf, we call him/ Atlas; a negro, Swan; a bent and disfigured girl/ Europa. Curs that are listless, and bald from years of mange/ and lick the rim of an empty lamp for oil, are given/ the name of Leopard.'
'However far back you care to go in tracing your name/ the fact remains that your clan began in a haven for outlaws.'
'Do you think it's nice and easy to thrust a proper-sized penis/ into a person's guts, encountering yesterday's dinner?/ The slave who ploughs a field has a lighter task than the one/ who ploughs its owner.'
'Don't you attach any value to the fact that, had I not been/ a loyal and devoted client, your wife would still be a virgin?'
'Shame is jeered as she leaves the city.'
'The whole of Rome is inside the Circus.'
'What other man these days... could bear to prefer his life to his plate, and his soul to his money?'
'If I happen to find a totally honest man, I regard/ that freak as I would a baby centaur.'
'Tears are genuine when they fall at the loss of money.'

Not to mention the classics, 'it's hard not to write satire,' 'who watches the watchmen,' 'bread and circuses,' 'healthy mind in a healthy body' (all translated slightly differently here).

All of these are funnier or crueler in context.

Rudd's translation (in the Oxford World's Classics edition) seems solid; I haven't compared it to the Latin. He translates line for line, which I imagine will make it easier to follow the original language, and in a loose meter which allows him to make everything make sense. It's rarely pretty, but it is readable. And his notes are excellent. ( )
  stillatim | Dec 29, 2013 |
Viser 1-5 af 14 (næste | vis alle)
Kelk ... refuses to patronize his readers and goes instead for a version that brings out the foreignness of the source text and does much to capture the high style that is a distinguishing mark of Juvenalian verse. He also captures his author’s linguistic force ...
 

» Tilføj andre forfattere (152 mulige)

Forfatter navnRolleHvilken slags forfatterVærk?Status
Iuvenalis, Decimus Iuniusprimær forfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
Barelli, EttoreOversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Canali, LucaIntroduktionmedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Creekmore, Hubert.Oversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
De Labriolle, PierreRedaktørmedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Ellenberger, BengtOversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Green, PeterOversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Hane-Scheltema, M. d'Oversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Humphries, RolfeOversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Janssen, JacquesDesignermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Kelk, ChristopherOversættermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Radice, BettyRedaktørmedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Villeneuve, FrançoisRedaktørmedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
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Must I be listening always, and not pay them back? How they bore me,
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All the satires, in translation.
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This is a rhyming-couplet translation of Juvenal's sixteen Satires, written in iambic pentameters. While remaining faithful to the original, it brings the work of the first-century Roman poet to the attention of a contemporary audience. Though subject to the strictures of such a poetic form, it is an accurate rendering while at the same time keeping the mordant and sardonic tone of the original. It is accepted that classical texts need a new inspection every so often and this is an attempt to make Juvenal appeal to a contemporary readership. While it may well find a niche among professional cl

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