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David Bowie Made Me Gay: 100 Years of LGBT…
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David Bowie Made Me Gay: 100 Years of LGBT Music (original 2017; udgave 2017)

af Darryl W. Bullock (Forfatter)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
712301,621 (3.08)3
With the advent of recording technology, LGBT messages were for the first time brought to the forefront of popular music. Bullock covers the history of recorded music by and for the LGBT community, and shows how those records influenced the evolution of the music we listen to today. He discusses how gay, lesbian, and bisexual performers influenced jazz and blues; examines the almost forgotten Pansy Craze in the years between the two World Wars; chronicles the dark years after the depression when gay life was driven deep underground; celebrates the re-emergence of LGBT performers in the post-Stonewall years; and highlights today's most legendary out-gay pop stars."This revealing and timely book is a must-have for anyone passionate about music. LGBT musicians have shaped the development of music over the last century, with a sexually progressive soundtrack in the background of the gay community's struggle for acceptance worldwide. With the advent of recording technology, LGBT messages were for the first time transferred from the cabaret stage and brought to the homes of millions. David Bowie Made Me Gay is the first book to cover the breadth of history of recorded music by and for the LGBT community: How have those records influenced the evolution of the music we listen to today? How have they inspired whole generations of disenfranchised youth? How could we ever have the Scissor Sisters or Lady Gaga without Billie Holiday, Disco and David Bowie? Through new interviews and contemporary reports, David Bowie Made Me Gay uncovers the lives of the people who made these records, and offers a lively canter through the scarcely documented history of LGBT music-makers. Bullock discusses the invaluable influence gay men, lesbians and bisexuals had on the growth of Jazz and Blues; looks at the almost forgotten world of gay life in the years between the two World Wars when many LGBT performers enjoyed a fame and freedom that would not be seen again until the 1970s and '80s; explores the emergence of Disco and Glamrock that gave birth to today's most legendary out-gay pop stars: Elton John, Boy George, Freddie Mercury, George Michael; and asks where we are today." -- Publisher's description… (mere)
Medlem:bookboy804
Titel:David Bowie Made Me Gay: 100 Years of LGBT Music
Forfattere:Darryl W. Bullock (Forfatter)
Info:Harry N. Abrams (2017), Edition: 1, 368 pages
Samlinger:Læst, men ikke ejet
Vurdering:***
Nøgleord:Public Library, Henrico

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David Bowie Made Me Gay: 100 Years of LGBT Music af Darryl W Bullock (2017)

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I am deeply conflicted about this book. On the one hand, it’s an important document, in that I haven’t seen anyone tackle the topic and there’s a lot to be learned and a lot to be inspired by. On the other, Bullock is writing from an older and less than current understanding of some queer identities (see warnings below) and outright omits any queer identity that isn’t L, G, B, or T. On the third, the book frequently gets bogged down in details such as record sales; assumes nerd level knowledge by, say, mentioning genres without defining them or assuming you know that band; and is just poorly edited enough that it can be hard to track who’s doing what to who when.

Oh, and if you’re looking for major icons like Bowie, Mercury, and John, they’re footnotes. I personally am okay with this because they have their own bios and the book largely exists to lift lesser known people into the limelight, but at the same time, I was disappointed that they featured as little as they did because they were still inspirations and important people and, well, Bowie is in the title.

Bullock’s done a very good job of covering his topic, though. All the queer musicians I knew of were mentioned, from Billy Tipton to Sister Rosetta Tharpe to k.d. lang (but not MIKA, now that I think of it), and a lot of musicians I’d never heard of or never knew were queer also feature. He also lists songwriters and music executives and the whole gamut of genres, from jazz to rock to folk to country to rap to musicals, and also mentions songs with queer content that weren’t by queer artists. After a few chapters, I started looking up songs and musicians on Youtube and adding them to a playlist that I’m still working through a few weeks later. There’s some pretty good music out there.

I also liked that he tells enough history of the wider queer community, the music industry, and the wider culture in general that you get context for how music and the world was changing. When did drag start and why? Why did disco become a gay thing? How did Stonewall and AIDS change things? Plus there’s discussion of lesbians and feminist folk festivals, of glam rock pairing gay flamboyance, of forgotten independent albums that have been rediscovered because of the internet, of the ups and downs in one’s ability to be out over time, of hooking up with people in bars.

And I appreciate that even though Bullock is very anglophone-focused, he’s made at least some effort to mention musicians and music from outside the English-speaking world and outside Europe. There’s not much, granted, but it’s there. He’s also up front about how some genres or countries are so homophobic that you can’t get a sense of the queer music history there because everyone is still closeted.

So, content-wise, apart from the infodump problem, I enjoyed this. I learned a lot and think it’s an important window into queer history that I’m kind of boggled has only been written now. As I said, there’s a lot to be inspired by, a lot of people being queer in their music and out despite the repercussions, and a definite sense that yes, queer people have always been here and better, they helped found whole genres. I’d certainly rec it to music lovers and people into queer history, even despite Bullock’s sporadically blinkered attitude towards identities and the other aforementioned problems, for that reason—but I cannot rec it without those warnings, which are also why this is not a 7.5 out of 10.

To bear in mind: Bullock appears at times to understand bisexuality as an undecided, questioning, or hedging identity and is definitely okay with misgendering and deadnaming trans musicians only to mention partway through the section that actually they are a man/woman. Similarly, he uses “transsexual”, seems to believe that people who’ve undergone surgery are more trans than those who haven’t, and defines “asexual” as genderless and sexually harmless. On another note, because this is a history of queer people and queer culture, any and all traumas that the community has faced appear, ranging from slurs and homophobic statements to gay bashings and the AIDS crisis. There is also a chapter that prominently features TERF musicians and TERF-friendly feminist spaces, but which also makes it quietly clear they’re harmful and not okay.

6.5/10 ( )
  NinjaMuse | Jul 26, 2020 |
It couldn't fail to an interesting read, but I felt the author was much more interested in the male artists than the women. For example. kd lang, who is a big star and out, only merits a few brief mentions, whilst here are several pages about an obscure male gay country artist I'd never heard of. Also, there is virtually nothing about the actual music. ( )
  LuxVestra | Feb 20, 2018 |
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With the advent of recording technology, LGBT messages were for the first time brought to the forefront of popular music. Bullock covers the history of recorded music by and for the LGBT community, and shows how those records influenced the evolution of the music we listen to today. He discusses how gay, lesbian, and bisexual performers influenced jazz and blues; examines the almost forgotten Pansy Craze in the years between the two World Wars; chronicles the dark years after the depression when gay life was driven deep underground; celebrates the re-emergence of LGBT performers in the post-Stonewall years; and highlights today's most legendary out-gay pop stars."This revealing and timely book is a must-have for anyone passionate about music. LGBT musicians have shaped the development of music over the last century, with a sexually progressive soundtrack in the background of the gay community's struggle for acceptance worldwide. With the advent of recording technology, LGBT messages were for the first time transferred from the cabaret stage and brought to the homes of millions. David Bowie Made Me Gay is the first book to cover the breadth of history of recorded music by and for the LGBT community: How have those records influenced the evolution of the music we listen to today? How have they inspired whole generations of disenfranchised youth? How could we ever have the Scissor Sisters or Lady Gaga without Billie Holiday, Disco and David Bowie? Through new interviews and contemporary reports, David Bowie Made Me Gay uncovers the lives of the people who made these records, and offers a lively canter through the scarcely documented history of LGBT music-makers. Bullock discusses the invaluable influence gay men, lesbians and bisexuals had on the growth of Jazz and Blues; looks at the almost forgotten world of gay life in the years between the two World Wars when many LGBT performers enjoyed a fame and freedom that would not be seen again until the 1970s and '80s; explores the emergence of Disco and Glamrock that gave birth to today's most legendary out-gay pop stars: Elton John, Boy George, Freddie Mercury, George Michael; and asks where we are today." -- Publisher's description

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