HjemGrupperSnakMereZeitgeist
Søg På Websted
På dette site bruger vi cookies til at levere vores ydelser, forbedre performance, til analyseformål, og (hvis brugeren ikke er logget ind) til reklamer. Ved at bruge LibraryThing anerkender du at have læst og forstået vores vilkår og betingelser inklusive vores politik for håndtering af brugeroplysninger. Din brug af dette site og dets ydelser er underlagt disse vilkår og betingelser.
Hide this

Resultater fra Google Bøger

Klik på en miniature for at gå til Google Books

The Night Diary af Veera Hiranandani
Indlæser...

The Night Diary (original 2019; udgave 2019)

af Veera Hiranandani (Forfatter)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
5462933,858 (4.19)19
Shy twelve-year-old Nisha, forced to flee her home with her Hindu family during the 1947 partition of India, tries to find her voice and make sense of the world falling apart around her by writing to her deceased Muslim mother in the pages of her diary.
Medlem:vmerkel
Titel:The Night Diary
Forfattere:Veera Hiranandani (Forfatter)
Info:Puffin Books (2019), Edition: Reprint, 288 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:History, India, Newbery Honor Book

Detaljer om værket

The Night Diary af Veera Hiranandani (2019)

Indlæser...

Bliv medlem af LibraryThing for at finde ud af, om du vil kunne lide denne bog.

Der er ingen diskussionstråde på Snak om denne bog.

» Se også 19 omtaler

Viser 1-5 af 29 (næste | vis alle)
Set in 1947, Hiranandani's book describes the traumatic end of British rule and the Partition, whereby India was divided into two countries. Young Nisha is the daughter of a doctor in what has become Pakistan, where his Hindu religion is suddenly rejected; however, his deceased wife was Muslim, leaving Nisha and her brother Amil in limbo. Along with their grandmother, they start a refugee trek to India, leaving behind their loyal and beloved housekeeper, who is also Muslim. Meeting and getting to know their mother's brother, someone they did not know existed, was nicely done, as was Nisha's cloaked friendship with a neighbor. I did not really care for the diary format of the book, but the message about religious intolerance is strong so I rounded up from 3.5 stars. ( )
  skipstern | Jul 11, 2021 |
children's historical fiction (1947 India/Pakistan Partition, diversity notes: aside from the obvious Indian Hindus and Muslims, the main character prefers to write than speak aloud and has an Uncle who happens to have a cleft palate).
I always think it's odd that Partition was absent or barely mentioned in my world history books considering how it affected the families of so many friends and neighbors. I'm hoping that curriculum has changed since my day, but even if it hasn't, this is a very accessible, child-friendly book that explains some of the situations that people found themselves in during that tumultuous period. It also includes fragrantly descriptive cooking scenes (so mouthwatering, even the simple dal), a glossary of cultural terms, and an inclusive, tolerant cast of characters.
In terms of violence, there is a scary scene where a man holds a blade to Nisha's throat, and another chaotic scene where several people of different faiths kill each other--though thanks to Nisha's trauma, she isn't able to dwell upon the details of that scene for very long).
There are also themes of friendship, bravery, and family (both by birth and by choice). ( )
  reader1009 | Jul 3, 2021 |
Nisha lives in India with her father, Dadi (grandmother), twin brother Amil, and their cook, Kiza. When the partition of India makes the area she's living in part of Pakistan, prompting her family to move and leave their Muslim cook behind, she begins writing in a diary addressed to her dead mother, also a Muslim, about the confusion and chaos of her life.

Diary narratives are hard to pull off, and this one does it really well. The places where Nisha doesn't write about events right away make sense, and the writing allows her to develop a voice - quite literally, as Nisha is shy and barely speaks to those around her. The hardships of being a refugee in one's own country are portrayed truthfully and sensitively. Though not always fun to read, it was a good book and ended on a hopeful note. ( )
  bell7 | Apr 7, 2021 |
The Night Diary is a journey. Both literally and emotionally. For such a small book, it carries a lot of weight.

First of all, Nisha. Our narrator, Nisha, is kind and sweet and quiet and hopeful and a little bit sad, too. The Night Diary is told through a journal format and made up of diary entries that Nisha writes to her mother. In these entries we see her fear, confusion, loneliness, joy, hope, excitement, regret… everything. The Night Diary is so filled with emotions. Nisha takes us along on her family’s pilgrimage as they migrate from newly created Pakistan to India. This book is intended for middle grade readers (ages 8 – 12) but as an adult, I found it accessible and engrossing. I’m also flabbergasted that this historical event was never touched upon in my education. One of oh-so-many ways Americans ignore the plights of the rest of the world, and how history is very white-centric.

It is worth mentioning that there are a few scenes in this book that may be a little unsettling. For one, there is a few moments of violence. Nisha is physically threatened. Their friend Kazi is injured early in the book. Near the end, fighting breaks out between a group of Sikhs, Muslims, and Hindu men and people are killed. Nisha watches all of this. I know in many middle grade novels this sort of violence would be frowned upon, but you must understand it’s important to The Night Diary. History is made of such unpleasantness, and to pretend otherwise is to belittle someone else’s pain in order to soothe our own discomfort. I think that the violence is an important part of telling an authentic story (The Night Diary is loosely based on Hiranandani’s father’s own pilgrimage). It would be up to parental discretion whether on not The Night Diary may be appropriate for their reader, but I personally think that this is the sort of book that ought to be taught in schools. I can think of so many other tired books that are still taught, and few feel as worthy or as relevant as The Night Diary.

Aside from the violence, Nisha’s family experience dehydration and hunger. They are threatened. They are degraded. The Night Diary is not a feel-good story. As I said at the start of this review – it is a journey. And a bit of a survival story, too. But Nisha, Amil, her father and grandmother have to survive humanity as well as nature.

I would, without a doubt, recommend this novel. I don’t feel like the heavier bits took anything away from the story – only added to it. The Night Diary is vibrant with life and filled with tantalizing descriptions of food and complicated relationships. I thought the ending was beautiful. I wish more stores similar to this one real life had such hopeful endings.

Regardless of your age, if you haven’t read The Night Diary, it’s an absolute-must read. ( )
  Morteana | Feb 17, 2021 |
This story is set in India in 1947 when part of the country partitions to be independent, eventually becoming Pakistan. The main character, Nisha, and her family must now leave the only home they've ever known to get to safety. I am would love to see more schools use this book in their curriculums! This is a great story for a Language Arts Class to look at as well as a History class. The story is written in the form of letter the main character writes to her mother who has passed away which gives a great view into the experiences and inner thoughts of the main character.
  vmerkel | Nov 19, 2020 |
Viser 1-5 af 29 (næste | vis alle)
ingen anmeldelser | tilføj en anmeldelse
Du bliver nødt til at logge ind for at redigere data i Almen Viden.
For mere hjælp se Almen Viden hjælpesiden.
Kanonisk titel
Originaltitel
Alternative titler
Oprindelig udgivelsesdato
Personer/Figurer
Vigtige steder
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Vigtige begivenheder
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Beslægtede film
Priser og hædersbevisninger
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Indskrift
Tilegnelse
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
For my dad
Første ord
Citater
Sidste ord
Oplysning om flertydighed
Forlagets redaktører
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Bagsidecitater
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Originalsprog
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

Henvisninger til dette værk andre steder.

Wikipedia på engelsk

Ingen

Shy twelve-year-old Nisha, forced to flee her home with her Hindu family during the 1947 partition of India, tries to find her voice and make sense of the world falling apart around her by writing to her deceased Muslim mother in the pages of her diary.

No library descriptions found.

Beskrivelse af bogen
Haiku-resume

Populære omslag

Quick Links

Vurdering

Gennemsnit: (4.19)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 8
3.5 5
4 33
4.5 7
5 24

Er det dig?

Bliv LibraryThing-forfatter.

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Brugerbetingelser/Håndtering af brugeroplysninger | Hjælp/FAQs | Blog | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterladte biblioteker | Tidlige Anmeldere | Almen Viden | 162,287,263 bøger! | Topbjælke: Altid synlig