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White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White…
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White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism (original 2018; udgave 2018)

af Robin DiAngelo (Forfatter), Michael Eric Dyson (Forord)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
2,086945,712 (3.96)54
The New York Times best-selling book exploring the counterproductive reactions white people have when their assumptions about race are challenged, and how these reactions maintain racial inequality. In this "vital, necessary, and beautiful book" (Michael Eric Dyson), antiracist educator Robin DiAngelo deftly illuminates the phenomenon of white fragility and "allows us to understand racism as a practice not restricted to 'bad people' (Claudia Rankine). Referring to the defensive moves that white people make when challenged racially, white fragility is characterized by emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and by behaviors including argumentation and silence. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium and prevent any meaningful cross-racial dialogue. In this in-depth exploration, DiAngelo examines how white fragility develops, how it protects racial inequality, and what we can do to engage more constructively.… (mere)
Medlem:NylesClaire
Titel:White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism
Forfattere:Robin DiAngelo (Forfatter)
Andre forfattere:Michael Eric Dyson (Forord)
Info:Beacon Press (2018), Edition: Reprint, 192 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:nonfiction, race, white anti-racism, anti-racism, racism

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White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism af Robin DiAngelo (2018)

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» Se også 54 omtaler

Viser 1-5 af 97 (næste | vis alle)
This is a fine book; I think I expected to learn a lot more than I did but that's not to say it isn't really important to learn, reinforce, and have articulated for the first or second or third etc. time. I found the writing pretty bleh, however.
  rosscharles | May 19, 2021 |
Approachable look at being white in a systemically racist society. ( )
  bookwyrmm | May 18, 2021 |
White Fragility, Robin DiAngelo, author; Amy Landon, narrator
When I finished the book, I had an unusual reaction. Instead of wanting to write my review immediately, while the book was fresh in my mind, I hesitated. How does one write a review of a book, when the author has pronounced that any statement that doesn’t agree with her own narrative, simply proves the person making the statement is a racist?
Actually, this author has condemned all White people as racists, with no hope for redemption. We must simply spend our whole lives working toward making amends for our whiteness, which has given us so much undeserved privilege. Our only hope for salvation is to try to be less white, to admit we are racist, even if we don’t think we are, because she has decided that we were all socialized as racists by virtue of our “White Fragility”, by virtue of our skin color and our history!
The idea is to make those of color more powerful by making those who are White, less powerful. I believe the intent should be to make all people equally powerful, but the author and some of her colleagues, believe that White people must suffer for the crimes of those who may or may not have been their ancestors and from their whiteness which provided them with their White Supremacy. Having been socialized as racists, even against our will, we are doomed to carry the shame and guilt of racism until death do us part and must struggle daily not to offend people of color, however, unintentionally.
Anyone White who protests and suggests that they, too, have experienced racism, is by virtue of that statement a racist. Her definition of racism is a one-way street. I think that DiAngelo has to meet a few survivors of the Holocaust and their progeny, to understand history a bit more broadly so she will see her own errors of judgment. Because our White Fragility has discomfited others, we must make amends for whatever sins people of color believe we have committed. The reasoning seems a bit irrational. Like an ill-informed parent, that insists on putting a child’s hand on the stove to learn it will hurt, to teach him a lesson, Whites are being asked to experience a kind of reverse racism, to understand their racism. This intent, of course is denied as is the possibility of the suggestion of reverse racism.
According to DiAngelo, the racism of Whites is irreversible. According to her, all Whites are responsible for their White Fragility because they have subjugated all people of color. The idea that this was largely a country of only educated White people capable of running a country is entirely dismissed. This country was built on a culture that included Judeo-Christian values, as most countries in the Western World were, as well. To expect the approximately 13% of the black population to have influenced the country in greater proportions seems incongruous as does the idea that every White person must feel guilt because they have not succeeded and blame our White Fragility for all that ails the many communities of color, completely ignoring the advances that 13% have achieved and often represent far more than their 13% in some fields of endeavor. Today, we are witnessing an over correction of this problem so that Whites may actually be forced out of certain fields to make room for those who feel neglected, regardless of qualifications, while they are not being forced out of the fields that they dominate to make room for Whites.
The author insists there are no quotas favoring the people of color, that minorities do not have that advantage, which means we cannot achieve equity even when we attempt to provide equality. Contradicting her is akin to being, guess what, a racist. So, with the circular reasoning she has put forth, she pronounces the fact that Whites cause fear in the hearts of Blacks. She honestly believes that Whites are abusing people of color and even murdering them 24/7. She states that in her book. The idea, on its face, seems a bit ludicrous since it is factually proven that people of color are murdering far more of their own numbers in many Democrat dominant cities.
She blames Trump for the heightened atmosphere of racism, although it has been statistically shown with polls and analysis, that it was most likely Obama that divided the country with his emphasis, and the black caucuses emphasis, on identity politics, after he was elected. That emphasis negated so much of our hope for unity and created a new schism between the races creating “safe spaces” for some, re-segregating dormitories, adopting separate venues for graduation and other divisive measures which served only to turn back the clock and prevent integration from advancing. She , using her own biases, falsely quotes Trump to prove her inaccurate statements. She never mentions the rude, racist statements made by Joe Biden or anyone else, for that matter, who supports views that do not coincide with her own. Her statements are not proven scientific facts, but she adheres to them as if they are and expects all of us to do the same.
She reinforces her theories by citing the fact that we never say White Americans, as we say Asian Americans, Black Americans, and/or Native Americans, etc.. She fails to mention that those groups have self-identified with those terms. She believes Whites are free to move in any space, as she is. Her education is a little lacking because she is unaware of the fact that I, as a Jew, cannot move freely about wherever I please. In addition, in this community of color, anti-Semitism may very well be on the rise. In this modern world, there are still quotas against Jews in many areas of life, particularly higher education. In addition, I am barred from clubs, certain schools and many neighborhoods. Blacks do not own oppression, no matter what she Coates or Kendi might say.
When every act of kindness toward a person of color is considered racist, what sense does it make for anyone to even want to attempt to bridge the gap between us. In addition, some of the reactions of people, like crossing the street when people of color approach, is not racism, but fear based on the history of crime from those people of color who look and act in a threatening manner. The news is filled with innocent people, Asians and Jews, being attacked by groups of black people, just for sport, in some cases. This fear that she describes as racist, because our White Fragility has inculcated this belief in us that people of color are dangerous, is simply more often, reality. However, my stating this is sure to trigger screams of racist in my direction. Truth is not tolerated because it might cause one to doubt much of the ideas presented in this and other books on the subject. The virtue signaling authors and public are merely attempting to make up for the historic subjugation of one group, by substituting and subjugating another.
When the author notes a woman of color’s joy because a make-up line was created for her, I wondered why there was such surprise and angst. If it took so long for a White person to develop the line, why hadn’t a woman of color developed it long before? Why was the delay the fault of White people? Why did Oprah invest in Africans and not in American people of color? Apparently, life here is better than life there.
DiAngelo says we can’t seek comfort from people of color because it triggers their painful memories. It reinforces our superiority and forces them to collude with us and our White Fragility. So, then, how can we ever be friends? She insists that our institutions were designed to be racist. She insists when we are nice to people of color it is to assuage our guilt and does not take courage. We must bravely confront our own racism because there is no other way. We must listen to the concerns of people of color and give them credence, but our concerns are trifling, illegitimate and not of any interest to her.
She makes many false assumptions and backs them up without facts. She uses some language that is condescending and pompous. The narrator’s tone is obsequious. So, as a reviewer, I am between a rock and a hard place. If I agree with the author, I am a racist. If I disagree with the author. I am also a racist. The entire burden Is on me to curb my White Fragility. Her advice to breathe, listen and reflect, sounds like someone preparing for meditation at a spa. She ignores the fact that society has given the community of color tools with which to achieve parity with the White community, but because they have failed, they are denied. To DiAngelo, no behavior of a person of color is responsible for any white person’s reaction to them because, by definition, any reaction would be racist.
I have searched out books to try and enlighten myself about the problems of society. Books like this are part of the problem, for me. They offer no solutions and do not address the reality on our streets. They simply offer blame, blame that I believe is not wholly undeserved. DiAngelo’s solution to the problem appears to be this: “White people must attempt to be less White. If White comfort maintains the racial status quo, the solution is to make White people uncomfortable”. Are we to be punished because we are White? Instead of expecting all of us to rise to a better standard of behavior, White behavior is described as oppressive and controlling. The author tells the story of a black man who called himself stupid. A black facilitator said whites made him feel that way. When a woman tried to explain, her explanation was considered racist. She was trying to explain it for the man of color as if he couldn’t explain it himself. It was not viewed as a kind gesture. When she cried, her tears were considered a weapon to grab the attention. White women who cry are manipulating people of color by stealing the spotlight. White women use this tactic all the time, the misogynist author declares. Well, I do not want to dumb down America to satisfy the need for equality. If that makes me a racist, so be it.
If White redemption can only be gained through suffering, but they can still never be totally anti-racist, what is the purpose of trying to change. The reasoning is circular. The narrative is filled with platitudes. We are not supposed to view the world through a lens of color, but if we say we are colorblind, we are racist because that is impossible to the author since we have been socialized as racists and they are a different color. She does not want black people to feel unseen, and she does not want White people to be relevant.
To be sure, there is not another species on the planet that would willingly allow another group to usurp its position of power, and then justify it by blaming the other group for having its power. I think we are in danger of creating a universal funny farm or Twilight Zone. If that makes me a racist, so be it. The idea is in the eye of the beholder, and I will try not to be looked upon as condescending to any person of color, or anyone else for that matter, although this author has made a practice of condescension. ( )
1 stem thewanderingjew | May 13, 2021 |
Imagine a guy arguing with his girlfriend by simply repeating "you're too emotional" for a few hours, and that's DiAngelo's book in a nutshell. One of the most depressing things about racism, apart from its immorality, injustice, etc., is how stupid it makes us all. I don't know how else to explain the popularity of this cynical, predatory cash-in, other than that emotionally-charged subjects like race remove our ability to think critically. Scam artists like DiAngelo claiming to palliate racism through word games, sophistry, bad history, and gimmick corporate seminars should remind us of medieval physicians waving leeches at us to treat an imbalance of the humours, but here we are sending her book up the charts in a desperate effort to avoid real work about racism and systemic inequalities.

A rational society would think twice about the incentive structure behind DiAngelo's business model - a white person paid thousands of dollars an hour to tell other white people what the correct opinions about minorities to have are - but an increasingly bureaucratized America addicted to rebranding its social problems as HR issues will naturally turn to familiar corporate solutions like this. Anyone who's had to sit through mandatory training knows that it's easier to just turn off your brain, let this stuff wash over you, and check the box marked Training Complete at the end: who wouldn't rather do that than real work? This book is short, repetitive, and written at bozo level, so if you are a white American who's feeling lazy, then buying and reading it might be a fairly cost- and time-effective alternative to activism, independent thought, self-education, or, god forbid, actually talking to a person of color.

Like many people, I came across this book just after the George Floyd protests. I think active anti-racism is incredibly important, and anyone with a conscience should be disgusted and outraged not only by specific instances of police brutality, but about the entire social system behind events like that. We have an obligation to each other and ourselves to speak up when something is wrong, and there's absolutely no shortage of work to be done. Part of that work is self-education, which is why I have such a viscerally negative reaction to this vile little tract, which DiAngelo frankly admits is not designed to convince open or even closet racists to be less racist. Quite the opposite - its goal is to convince well-meaning white people trying to be not-racist that in fact they were actually racist all along without them having known it. This is a strange tactic if your goal is to reduce the overall goal of racism in a society, but DiAngelo's real goal is to maintain her lifetime sinecure of bullying hapless victims in corporate workshops with carefully constructed trap-door arguments about privilege that are impossible to engage in good-faith dialogue with.

You solve no problems by giving DiAngelo a single penny, whether by buying this book (I didn't) or ponying up for one of her seminars. When you get right down to it, DiAngelo's efforts to focus all attention on your individual thoughts and behaviors and none on America's broken laws are exactly identical to all the tedious debates you hear about whether it's fair to force people to not use plastic straws, when meanwhile fossil fuel plants are burning billions of tons of CO2 a year. If you actually care about climate change, then it's a complete waste of time to guilt-trip people about straws - you should be helping to get clean energy laws passed (and given that people of color are disproportionately affected by climate change, you'd be doing even more good). Go donate money to sustainable energy groups! But then there wouldn't be any money left to pay a straw fragility consultant thousands of dollars an hour to lecture you about how even if you don't use straws at all you're still destroying the planet, and as it turns out strawmen are DiAngelo's entire business model. ( )
1 stem aaronarnold | May 11, 2021 |
Dr. Will Lewis hosted a virtual session with DiAngelo in April 2020. First half and last chapter were strongest. There is a 9-page ‘notes’ Word doc on Robert’s laptop of highlighted passages. ( )
  WakeWacko | Apr 27, 2021 |
Viser 1-5 af 97 (næste | vis alle)
CHOTINER: So you consider yourself a racist right now?

DiANGELO: Yes. I will always have a racist worldview and biases. The way I look at it is I’m really clear that I do less harm than I used to. I perpetrate that racism less often. I’m not defensive at all when I realize—whether myself or it’s been brought to my attention—that I’ve just perpetrated a piece of it. I have really good repair skills. None of those are small things because they mean I do less harm.
tilføjet af elenchus | RedigerSlate.com, Isaac Chotiner (Aug 2, 2018)
 

» Tilføj andre forfattere (6 mulige)

Forfatter navnRolleHvilken slags forfatterVærk?Status
Robin DiAngeloprimær forfatteralle udgaverberegnet
Dyson, Michael EricForordmedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Landon, AmyFortællermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Roe, LouisOmslagsfotograf/tegner/...medforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Tatusian, AlexDesignermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
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I am a white American raised in the United States. I have a white frame of reference and a white worldview, and I move through the world with a white experience. My experience is not a universal human experience.
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The New York Times best-selling book exploring the counterproductive reactions white people have when their assumptions about race are challenged, and how these reactions maintain racial inequality. In this "vital, necessary, and beautiful book" (Michael Eric Dyson), antiracist educator Robin DiAngelo deftly illuminates the phenomenon of white fragility and "allows us to understand racism as a practice not restricted to 'bad people' (Claudia Rankine). Referring to the defensive moves that white people make when challenged racially, white fragility is characterized by emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and by behaviors including argumentation and silence. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium and prevent any meaningful cross-racial dialogue. In this in-depth exploration, DiAngelo examines how white fragility develops, how it protects racial inequality, and what we can do to engage more constructively.

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