HjemGrupperSnakMereZeitgeist
Søg På Websted
På dette site bruger vi cookies til at levere vores ydelser, forbedre performance, til analyseformål, og (hvis brugeren ikke er logget ind) til reklamer. Ved at bruge LibraryThing anerkender du at have læst og forstået vores vilkår og betingelser inklusive vores politik for håndtering af brugeroplysninger. Din brug af dette site og dets ydelser er underlagt disse vilkår og betingelser.
Hide this

Resultater fra Google Bøger

Klik på en miniature for at gå til Google Books

Born to Be Posthumous: The Eccentric Life…
Indlæser...

Born to Be Posthumous: The Eccentric Life and Mysterious Genius of Edward… (original 2018; udgave 2018)

af Mark Dery (Forfatter)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
273875,830 (3.98)2
"The definitive biography of Edward Gorey, the eccentric master of macabre nonsense. From The Gashlycrumb Tinies to The Doubtful Guest, Edward Gorey's wickedly funny, deliciously sinister little books have influenced our culture in countless ways, from Tim Burton's movies to Anna Sui's fashion to Neil Gaiman's Coraline to Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events. Some call him the Grandfather of Goth (which would've given him the fantods). Just who was this man, who lived with six cats, owned more than 20,000 books, roomed with the poet Frank O'Hara at Harvard, and liked to traipse around in floor-length fur coats, clanking bracelets, and an Edwardian beard? An eccentric, a solitary, an enigmatic auteur of whimsically morbid masterpieces, yes -- but who was the real Edward Gorey behind the Oscar Wildean pose? He published over a hundred books and illustrated works by Samuel Beckett, T. S. Eliot, Edward Lear, John Updike, Charles Dickens, Muriel Spark, Bram Stoker, and John Bellairs (most notably The House with a Clock in Its Walls), among others. At the same time, he was a deeply complicated and secretive man, a reclusive master whose art reflected his obsessions with the disquieting, the darkly amusing, and... other things. Based on newly uncovered correspondence and interviews with Goreyphiles as diverse as John Ashbery, Donald Hall, Lemony Snicket, Neil Gaiman, Edmund White, and Anna Sui, Born to Be Posthumous draws back the curtain on this mysterious genius and his eccentric life." --… (mere)
Medlem:riverlady2
Titel:Born to Be Posthumous: The Eccentric Life and Mysterious Genius of Edward Gorey
Forfattere:Mark Dery (Forfatter)
Info:William Collins (c.2018),1st Edition
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

Detaljer om værket

Born to be Posthumous: the Eccentric Life and Mysterious Genius of Edward Gorey af Mark Dery (2018)

Indlæser...

Bliv medlem af LibraryThing for at finde ud af, om du vil kunne lide denne bog.

Der er ingen diskussionstråde på Snak om denne bog.

» Se også 2 omtaler

Viser 1-5 af 8 (næste | vis alle)
You could easily define me as an “Anything Gorey” kind of a guy, and this well-designed book was pretty satisfying from both an informational and a visual angle. There was a rich variety of black and white illustrations as well as photos all through the book. And even though I’ve been reading about Edward St. John Gorey for many years now, I still learned a great deal from this book. Possibly my only complaint is the author’s over-the-top fascination with what was Gorey’s sexual orientation, gay or asexual. For myself, I could care less but Mark Dery can’t leave the subject alone, returning to it again and again.

This is a full biography, from Gorey’s birth in February of 1925 to his April death in 2000, and while Dery isn’t a memorable writer, he does cover the material very thoroughly. It was a treat to learn so much more about someone that I thought a had a pretty full picture of. A picture that so often involved full-length fur coats, dirty tennis shoes, tons of rings covering his fingers, and that distinctive beard.

The book quotes Daniel Handler, better known as Lemony Snicket. “When I was first writing A Series of Unfortunate Events,” he says, “I was wandering around everywhere saying, I am a complete rip-off of Edward Gorey,” and everyone said, “Who’s that?” That was in 1999. “Now, everyone says, ‘That’s right you are a complete rip-off of Edward Gorey.’”

Here, so you’ll go away from this review with some knowledge.

His roommate at Harvard was Frank O’Hara.
He loved Agatha Christie.
His speech was peppered with midwestern words like zippy, zingy, goody, and jeepers.
He was a bookworm and was always reading in any line he had to be a part of.
His beard hid that he was a chinless wonder, according to Dery.
He considered working in publishing or opening a bookstore.
“I wanted to have my own bookstore until I worked in one.”
He hated Henry James for explaining things to death in his writing.
He loved horror films.
He drove a bright yellow VW Beetle with OGDRED on the plate.
He once said of death, “I hope it comes painlessly and quickly.”

If you want to know more, simply read the book. ( )
  jphamilton | May 21, 2021 |
There are many reasons to be fascinated by the life of Edward Gorey, a man who lived his life exactly as he chose. In this book, Mark Dery illuminates as much as he can about "Ted"'s childhood, his art, his writing, his relationships, while also being very clear about what he cannot tell. Remarkably even-handed yet also illuminating, this is a thorough and engaging biography of a brilliant oddball. ( )
  Katester123 | Sep 17, 2020 |
I wanted so badly to like this a lot more than I did. I like Gorey’s work and I was curious to learn more about him, especially since I’ve seen stuff floating around that he was ace. And then, while reading, there was so much else about him that resonated: his determined individuality, his gothic leanings, a fair bit of his attitudes in general. He really felt like a kindred spirit in a lot of ways, or at least someone who could and should be a role model for what Dery calls, “the weirdos.”

And, like, I don’t really read biographies, that’s not generally my thing at all, but this one didn’t seem … great? Dery’s writing’s good and he’s done a lot of research and thinking, that’s clear. He mentions stuff that was going on concurrently with periods of Gorey’s life, like New York gay culture and the crime-ridden Chicago he grew up in, and links that to what Gorey was doing (or not doing, as the case may be), and there’s also a lot of space devoted to Gorey’s books, what their content can tell us about Gorey’s inner life, and the evolution of his work over time. All good things, right?

Except that Dery’s stance is very curious and I’m having a hard time parsing the reasons why I feel that. There’s the literary analysis, of course, which Dery stretches as far as he can manage and occasionally then some. (Love of detail and precision? Good. Frequent gay subtext? Works for me. Tall bearded men always being self-insert characters? Um.) And there are similar stretches based on actual known details, starting with “Gorey worked in small windowless rooms, which must be psychologically meaningful and not just because he didn’t want distraction”, moving through, “Gorey didn’t want to talk about his private life and history so clearly he had a traumatic childhood”, and ending with Gorey as a queer man, which is a whole other paragraph. There’s also some weirdness about Gorey’s writing and art being so great and so unique and Gorey being such an individual that everyone knew a different side of him, that is so unusual and nobody else has different personalities in different contexts ever.

And now, the queer stuff. This is the most curious part of a curious stance. I don’t know if Dery’s gay and doing something similar to me here, wanting a cultural figure to share your orientation so much you’ll overlook other valid options*, or if he’s straight and slightly clueless, but, um. Well. There’s no denying that Gorey was romantically interested in men, embraced camp, had gay friends and queer characters, and had some stereotypically gay interests**. He also described himself as “asexual” and “undersexed” and there’s no evidence he ever had more than one bout of unpleasant adolescent sex and maybe made out a few times. To me that reads as homoromantic ace/demi. To Dery at various points, that’s “closeted gay man who just won’t talk about sex because he’s of a certain generation”, “gay man so traumatized by bad sex he swore off it”, and “probably asexual gay man”, and yes, that’s not consistent and yes, there are lots of uses of “asexual” that do not jive with current usage. Which is weird because Dery’s done his research into gay culture during Gorey’s lifetime but he seems not to have cared much about what asexuality even is? He just discounts that it’s even possible for Gorey to have be ace—until the last chapter, where he backtracks.

Sigh.

To be fair, Dery’s still pretty level and factual and doesn’t make totally unsubstantiated claims. It’s just that he doesn’t totally support them either and there are definitely instances where his reading of the facts and my reading of them didn’t line up. (I’m inclined to take Gorey at face value. Dery’s inclined to say, “but that could be an act, maybe he didn’t mean it”.) And yes, I get that it’s hard to write a bio of someone who was very private and I think Dery’s done a good job considering, it’s just … between the assumptions and the odd tone and his treatment of Gorey’s sexuality and presentation I found it lacking. And off-putting. And disappointing and sometimes frustrating.

I’m glad I read it and I did learn a good deal, and I’d even still rec this to people who’re interested but with a very strong suggestion to read it critically and make up your own mind about who Gorey was. Don’t necessarily stick to Dery’s version of him.

*and yes, I fully admit that I really, really want Gorey to have been ace

** I also find it off-putting that Dery bases a lot of his evidence for Gorey being gay on “well, he fits the stereotype” and “if he wasn’t gay, why was he drawing homoerotic subtext?”

Warnings: If you’re gay or gay-friendly, be prepared for stereotyping. If you’re aspec or aspec-friendly, be prepared for mild erasure. Use of the f-slur in quotes, and of phrases like “the gays” and “the homosexual” in ways that suggest Dery’s tried to capture historical mindsets. I think the n-word popped up in a quote at one point too, but I don’t have the book with me to check.

6/10 ( )
1 stem NinjaMuse | Jul 26, 2020 |
I have had to set this book aside, maybe for a while, maybe forever. Of course, there is the opening to Masterpiece Mystery. But that is certainly not the only good one; there are Game of Thrones, Elementary, Bosch, The Wild Wild West. And if I had to choose, I would say I enjoy hearing a good soundtrack more: Secret Agent Man, Mission Impossible, The Wild Wild West again, even the William Tell Overture.

So based on that I never would have picked this book but I alleviated a humid and uneventful vacation on Cape Cod by going to his house well before this book was published. The tour guide mentioned his abrupt dropping the wearing of fur coats and attendance at the New York City Ballet which was amusing.

The first three chapters cover his childhood and upbringing, his hitch in the army and then his college years. Admittedly I did not get through all that but it was an inkling that this seventy-five year life didn't deserve a 415 page treatment.

Then there is the title. Gorey was not born posthumously and obviously he was mortal, so what is the point?

There is this clunker on page 35:

They're cute in a Joan Walsh Anglund meet Harold and the Purple Crayon way that clashes with our image of what's Goreyesque.

WTF?

Two pages later we are told (for those who don't know) that "Spanish" in 1944 means "Latinx" now.

I am probably not the target audience for this book.

Finally Gorey was a private person who guarded his privacy and the author seems determined to breach that and claim him for the gay pride movement. ( )
  JoeHamilton | Jul 21, 2020 |
It illuminates without washing out the wonder of the works or the man himself. A worthwhile read, like discovering Gorey's unique world again. ( )
  ThomasPluck | Apr 27, 2020 |
Viser 1-5 af 8 (næste | vis alle)
ingen anmeldelser | tilføj en anmeldelse

» Tilføj andre forfattere (3 mulige)

Forfatter navnRolleHvilken slags forfatterVærk?Status
Mark Deryprimær forfatteralle udgaverberegnet
Sims, AdamFortællermedforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Tierney, JimOmslagsfotograf/tegner/...medforfatternogle udgaverbekræftet
Du bliver nødt til at logge ind for at redigere data i Almen Viden.
For mere hjælp se Almen Viden hjælpesiden.
Kanonisk titel
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Originaltitel
Alternative titler
Oprindelig udgivelsesdato
Personer/Figurer
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Vigtige steder
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Vigtige begivenheder
Beslægtede film
Priser og hædersbevisninger
Information fra den russiske Almen Viden. Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Indskrift
Tilegnelse
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
For Margot Mifflin, whose wild surmise - "What about a Gorey biography?" - begat this book. Without her unwavering support, generous beyond measure, it would have remained just that: a gleam in her eye. I owe her this - and more than tongue can tell.
Første ord
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Edward Gorey was born to be posthumous.
Citater
Sidste ord
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
(Klik for at vise Advarsel: Kan indeholde afsløringer.)
Oplysning om flertydighed
Forlagets redaktører
Bagsidecitater
Originalsprog
Oplysninger fra den engelske Almen Viden Redigér teksten, så den bliver dansk.
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

Henvisninger til dette værk andre steder.

Wikipedia på engelsk

Ingen

"The definitive biography of Edward Gorey, the eccentric master of macabre nonsense. From The Gashlycrumb Tinies to The Doubtful Guest, Edward Gorey's wickedly funny, deliciously sinister little books have influenced our culture in countless ways, from Tim Burton's movies to Anna Sui's fashion to Neil Gaiman's Coraline to Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events. Some call him the Grandfather of Goth (which would've given him the fantods). Just who was this man, who lived with six cats, owned more than 20,000 books, roomed with the poet Frank O'Hara at Harvard, and liked to traipse around in floor-length fur coats, clanking bracelets, and an Edwardian beard? An eccentric, a solitary, an enigmatic auteur of whimsically morbid masterpieces, yes -- but who was the real Edward Gorey behind the Oscar Wildean pose? He published over a hundred books and illustrated works by Samuel Beckett, T. S. Eliot, Edward Lear, John Updike, Charles Dickens, Muriel Spark, Bram Stoker, and John Bellairs (most notably The House with a Clock in Its Walls), among others. At the same time, he was a deeply complicated and secretive man, a reclusive master whose art reflected his obsessions with the disquieting, the darkly amusing, and... other things. Based on newly uncovered correspondence and interviews with Goreyphiles as diverse as John Ashbery, Donald Hall, Lemony Snicket, Neil Gaiman, Edmund White, and Anna Sui, Born to Be Posthumous draws back the curtain on this mysterious genius and his eccentric life." --

No library descriptions found.

Beskrivelse af bogen
Haiku-resume

LibraryThing-forfatter

Mark Dery er LibraryThing-forfatter, en forfatter som har sit personlige bibliotek opført på LibraryThing.

profil side | forfatterside

Populære omslag

Quick Links

Vurdering

Gennemsnit: (3.98)
0.5
1
1.5
2 2
2.5
3 4
3.5 2
4 6
4.5 1
5 8

 

Om | Kontakt | LibraryThing.com | Brugerbetingelser/Håndtering af brugeroplysninger | Hjælp/FAQs | Blog | Butik | APIs | TinyCat | Efterladte biblioteker | Tidlige Anmeldere | Almen Viden | 162,431,667 bøger! | Topbjælke: Altid synlig