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Many: The Diversity of Life on Earth

af Nicola Davies

Andre forfattere: Emily Sutton (Illustrator)

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645317,012 (3.89)Ingen
The more we study the world around us, the more living things we discover every day. The planet is full of millions of species of plants, birds, animals, and microbes, and every single one including us is part of a big, beautiful, complicated pattern. When humans interfere with parts of the pattern, by polluting the air and oceans, taking too much from the sea, and cutting down too many forests, animals and plants begin to disappear. What sort of world would it be if it went from having many types of living things to having just one?… (mere)

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Viser 5 af 5
British author/illustrator team Nicola Davies and Emily Sutton, whose other collaborations include Tiny Creatures: The World of Microbes and Grow: Secrets of Our DNA, turn to the subject of biological diversity in this wonderful work of picture-book natural history. Discussing the wealth of living creatures to be found on our planet, from the two kinds of elephant to the six hundred kinds of oak tree, from the one hundred thousand kinds of mushroom to the one billion kinds of microbe, the text here then moves on to a discussion of the human activities which threaten the natural world. The book finished with a plea for better understanding, and an acknowledgement that we humans are also a part of this planet's wealth of life...

Originally published in the UK as Lots: The Diversity of Life on Earth, and then renamed Many: The Diversity of Life on Earth for the American market, this lovely book features a simple but informative and though-provoking text, and absolutely gorgeous illustrations. The rich diversity of life on Earth is paralleled by the detailed and colorful wealth of creatures depicted by Emily Sutton on these pages. I think this may be my favorite yet, of the books I have read that were illustrations by Sutton. My only critique here would be the absence of any list of sources or ideas for further reading, which could have been very helpful for young children. Recommended to young nature and animal lovers, and to picture-book readers looking for titles with an ecological theme. ( )
  AbigailAdams26 | Jan 16, 2021 |
A great book to spark discussions on how we need to treat our planet in a respectful way.
  Morgan1983 | Nov 9, 2018 |
I'm really torn about this book, but it's overdue at the library I borrowed it from, so I have to make up my mind!

With simple text but lyrical text, Davies explains the concept of biodiversity. The story begins with one cockroach, then adds a girl, then a bush, and then there are many things in the facing spread. Davies examines elephants and seashells, species identification and classification, food cycles and slight differences in species. This section of the story closes with a rich jungle scene, teaming with life.

The last five spreads strike sobering note in this exploration. Davies explains that biodiversity is shrinking, due to pollution, the destruction of habitats, and other human activities. We see the same jungle scene, this time with fallen trees and only a few living things left. There is a view of a museum exhibit of extinct animals and an opposing view of creatures that still exist, although many are endangered. The final spread shows a last scene with the same opening variety of animals faced by a page that shows only the girl. The text reads, "because we could not keep living on earth if we had to count down instead of up.../from MANY to one."

I like Davies' text, but I truly love Sutton's illustrations. Beginning with elaborate endpapers featuring a wide variety of green pen drawings of various flora and fauna, and moving into the increasingly involved art, Sutton shows the intrepid, red-haired explorer venturing beneath the sea, into the jungle, to hot springs and reefs, the Galapagos and deserts. Along the way we see a huge variety of animals, plants, microbes, bugs, and many other forms of life.

One thing, however, gives me pause. This picture book is directed at one children, but the ending felt very dark to me. I'm not particularly a fan of sugar-coating realities for kids, but I also believe in presenting them with some kind of hope and assurance. The problems shown are far too big for a child to even contemplate solving and that final sentence is frighteningly dark.

Verdict: Every child will react differently to this, but it's one I'd include as part of a unit, with an adult to discuss, not one I'd hand a child alone to read. I do really love the illustrations though.

ISBN: 9780763694838; Published November 2017 by Candlewick; Borrowed from another library
  JeanLittleLibrary | Apr 28, 2018 |
Beautiful book ( )
  melodyreads | Apr 24, 2018 |
The cover drew me in. It reminds me of a sketchbook or colorful and detailed field journal. I think a combination of mediums might have been used, such as pastels, colored pencils, and watercolors. The drawings are a beautiful combination of simple and complex. They are cartoonish yet capture important details. The texture of the elephant skin makes me want to stroke the page and see if it feels as rough and bumpy as it looks. The leaves on the trees seem prickly to my eyes. It’s a play on one’s senses. I found myself scrutinizing each page, to make sure I picked up on all the important elements. The illustrations wonderfully carry the science of the content.
  Stewart24 | Apr 7, 2018 |
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Nicola Daviesprimær forfatteralle udgaverberegnet
Sutton, EmilyIllustratormedforfatteralle udgaverbekræftet
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The more we study the world around us, the more living things we discover every day. The planet is full of millions of species of plants, birds, animals, and microbes, and every single one including us is part of a big, beautiful, complicated pattern. When humans interfere with parts of the pattern, by polluting the air and oceans, taking too much from the sea, and cutting down too many forests, animals and plants begin to disappear. What sort of world would it be if it went from having many types of living things to having just one?

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