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Snow & Rose af Emily Winfield Martin
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Snow & Rose (udgave 2017)

af Emily Winfield Martin (Forfatter)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
2371086,644 (4.1)3
A New York Timesbestselling author-illustrator brings readers into the woods to meet two young sisters and a strange bit of magic in this reimagining of the classic but little-known fairy tale "Snow White and Rose Red." Snow and Rose didn't know they were in a fairy tale. People never do. . . . Once, they lived in a big house with spectacular gardens and an army of servants. Once, they had a father and mother who loved them more than the sun and moon. But that was before their father disappeared into the woods and their mother disappeared into sorrow. This is the story of two sisters and the enchanted woods that have been waiting for them to break a set of terrible spells. Bestselling author-illustrator Emily Winfield Martin has created a world that sits on the border of enchantment, with characters who are grounded in real emotions that readers will recognize in themselves.… (mere)
Medlem:tyratae
Titel:Snow & Rose
Forfattere:Emily Winfield Martin (Forfatter)
Info:Random House Books for Young Readers (2017), 224 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:Ingen

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Snow & Rose af Emily Winfield Martin

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Viser 1-5 af 10 (næste | vis alle)
A lovely, lighthearted retelling of Snow White and Rose Red with gorgeous illustrations!

Sisters Snow and Rose used to live in a big house with magnificent gardens and parents who loved them very much. But now they must make do in a cabin deep in the forest, with their father missing and their mother lost in grief. One day Snow and Rose venture off the path into the wilds of the woods and discover some strange things … an underground house … a library without books … and a mysterious little man with magical powers. They don’t know it yet, but there is a curse waiting to be broken!

This is such a beautiful, sweet story. If I ever have kids someday, I will be reading this to them at bedtime! ( )
  vvbooklady | May 26, 2021 |
“Snow and Rose didn’t know they were living in a fairytale… people never do.”
This blurbs perfectly sets up the magic realism of this middle school tale, presented as an old fashioned gift book with gentle watercolour illustrations by the author that perfectly match the tone of the novel. When Snow and Rose’s father disappears, they move from a comfortable city home to a cottage in the woods - and what woods these are, with mysterious trees and waterfalls, underground houses, and a library of objects bearing ‘stories’. As they search for their father, steadfast Snow and brave Rose’s adventures unfold with a loving, gentle tone, and Martin’s style captures in vivid detail their curiosity and wonder at the forest and its inhabitants. There are phrases that make me see the world anew (“The look on [the gardener’s] face split the uneasy difference between a smile and a frown… [and his] crepe-papery eyes crinkled…”), or paint my imagination with whimsy (the elderly librarian moves with “catawampus steps caused by her wooden leg”), and the forest itself is a character, commenting eerily on the action (He should be in the earth, ground underfoot for the worms to feast”), yet Martin never lets go of the fact that this is essentially a family story about two sisters and their parents, and the way the challenges of forest living reinforce their trust and affection for one another.
I loved Snow and Rose, reading as slowly as possible to spin it out longer, but there were some class assumptions I found difficult to reconcile with the overall gentleness of the tale: even in the forest, Rose and Snow live a gentile life with ornaments and books and regular trips to the market, whereas their forest-friend, Iva, lives in an underground house made from roots and rough-hewn planks, and forages and grows mushrooms for a living. Despite their hospitality, Rose realises that “Ivo’s family doesn’t read. People that don’t read books believe in superstition.” So they are placed in a lower position than the ever-kind heroines and only just above the villain-brigands, particularly when they begin to hunt the gigantic bear the girls befriended. I guess these class distinctions are right out of the original Grimm’s tale, but, for me, they sat oddly against the overall moral of kindness to other creatures. Younger, less political readers, however will not notice them at all.
The recommendation on the back suggests readers 8-12 and I agree, but Matin’s beautifully –paced episodic structure makes it a great readaloud for smaller children, and a comfort read for the teens or adults reading to them. It is, perhaps, the book you read just before you’re old enough to read Katherine Rundell, whose writing is just that little more evocative and holds that little more darkness.“To find out what a story’s really about”, the librarian said, “you don’t ask the writer. You ask the reader.” So go ahead, read the novel, and find out what Snow and Rose is really about!
Highly recommended to every family or school library, and anyone who loves fairy tales. ( )
  IsabellaLucia | Oct 24, 2020 |
Exquisitely lovely, but not without a air of menace. Delightfully twee illustrations. I want to reread this every winter, preferably during a snowstorm. ( )
  libraryhead | Jan 9, 2019 |
I’ve always been a fan of fairytale retellings and this middle-grade didn’t disappoint. I was briefly reminded of Margo Lanagan’s Tender Morsels, but only because the stores are loosely (very loosely) similar. Fortunately, this book wasn't bizarre and off-putting and boring.

Martin wrote and illustrated a delightful little fairytale. Two sisters (one light-haired, the other dark, as is traditional) explore the forest around them as they reluctantly try to adjust to life without their father and the home they grew up in. Naturally, they come across some strange happenings.

Like many fairytales, descriptions are used sparingly, but in all the right places. The beautiful, watercolor (or, at least they look that way, maybe she used markers) illustrations help fill in some of the details too. The girls were spunky and smart and their world had just enough magic – giving me that nostalgic feeling of possibility that I, too, could have stumbled upon a magic forest, without feeling too saturated or bizarre.

The girls and their mother do befriend a strangely tame bear and he lives with them during the winter – hence the Tender Morsels vibe. I’m sure both books have roots in the same tale. This one is obviously geared towards younger readers and I vastly preferred it to the aforementioned story. I did think this was going to be a bit darker – though it’s ok that it’s not – but there is a detail that’s revealed later in the story and not addressed after the ending that left me thinking there is a bit of darkness here, it’s just not as obvious. I dig it.

If you’re a fan of tales where children explore a magical forest, meet bespelled creatures, discover friends in strange places and take charge of their own fate, you’ll probably enjoy this. I can’t recall if I’ve read older versions of Snow and Rose, so I’m not sure how faithfully it sticks to its origins (and I don’t care), but if you also enjoy fairytale retellings and middle-grade, you’ll probably enjoy this. ( )
  MillieHennessy | Jun 20, 2018 |
2.5*

Although this book contains beautiful illustrations, this retelling of the classic fairy tale is slow-paced and lackluster. The story does pick up at the end but by then I was already detached from the story. ( )
  DMPrice | Jun 17, 2018 |
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To my mother, who called me Rose Red
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Once, there were two sisters.
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It [mother's sadness] took up a lot of room in such a small house. (p. 14)
... Rose would nestle against a tree with a book or go for a walk with her satchel over her shoulder, up and down the path. Between Snow's anger and her mother's sadness, it was hard for Rose to keep her own heart afloat, but the walks helped. As she made notes of the ferns and flowers that grew at her feet, she strained her eyes to see what lay in the dark forest beyond the path, and for those moments her curiosity drowned out everything else. (p. 15)
In big, untidy rows grew a gathering of hunched old men, with beards of grey-green lichen, and roots that sprawled like ancient hands.
Tiny ones grew alongside giants, their caps glowing scarlet and pink, biscuity brown, and ghostly white in the dark of the cavern. They grew round, squat, branching, and slender. (p. 56)
"To find out what a story's REALLY about," the Librarian said, "you don't ask the writer. You ask the READER."
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A New York Timesbestselling author-illustrator brings readers into the woods to meet two young sisters and a strange bit of magic in this reimagining of the classic but little-known fairy tale "Snow White and Rose Red." Snow and Rose didn't know they were in a fairy tale. People never do. . . . Once, they lived in a big house with spectacular gardens and an army of servants. Once, they had a father and mother who loved them more than the sun and moon. But that was before their father disappeared into the woods and their mother disappeared into sorrow. This is the story of two sisters and the enchanted woods that have been waiting for them to break a set of terrible spells. Bestselling author-illustrator Emily Winfield Martin has created a world that sits on the border of enchantment, with characters who are grounded in real emotions that readers will recognize in themselves.

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