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From Here to Eternity: Traveling the World…
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From Here to Eternity: Traveling the World to Find the Good Death (udgave 2018)

af Caitlin Doughty (Forfatter)

MedlemmerAnmeldelserPopularitetGennemsnitlig vurderingOmtaler
8634118,647 (4.25)25
Fascinated by our pervasive fear of dead bodies, mortician Caitlin Doughty set out to discover how other cultures care for the dead. In rural Indonesia, she watches a man clean and dress his grandfather's mummified body, which has resided in the family home for two years. In La Paz, she meets Bolivian natitas (cigarette-smoking, wish-granting human skulls), and in Tokyo she encounters the Japanese kotsuage ceremony, in which relatives use chopsticks to pluck their loved-ones' bones from cremation ashes. Doughty vividly describes decomposed bodies and investigates the world's funerary history. She introduces deathcare innovators researching body composting and green burial, and examines how varied traditions, from Mexico's Días de los Muertos to Zoroastrian sky burial help us see our own death customs in a new light. Doughty contends that the American funeral industry sells a particular -- and, upon close inspection, peculiar -- set of 'respectful' rites: bodies are whisked to a mortuary, pumped full of chemicals, and entombed in concrete. She argues that our expensive, impersonal system fosters a corrosive fear of death that hinders our ability to cope and mourn. By comparing customs, she demonstrates that mourners everywhere respond best when they help care for the deceased, and have space to participate in the process. Illustrated by artist Landis Blair, From Here to Eternity is an adventure into the morbid unknown, a story about the many fascinating ways people everywhere have confronted the very human challenge of mortality.… (mere)
Medlem:AshleyHope
Titel:From Here to Eternity: Traveling the World to Find the Good Death
Forfattere:Caitlin Doughty (Forfatter)
Info:WW Norton (2018), Edition: Reprint, 272 pages
Samlinger:Dit bibliotek
Vurdering:
Nøgleord:to-read

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From Here to Eternity: Traveling the World to Find the Good Death af Caitlin Doughty

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» Se også 25 omtaler

Viser 1-5 af 41 (næste | vis alle)
Honestly, I didn't enjoy this *as* much as Smoke, but it was still absolutely wonderful. I especially liked the chapters on alternative death practices and rituals here in the US...even though we're still heavily mired in the commercialization of the funeral industry and puritanical view of death, these few examples give me hope and definitely pique my curiosity into what else is out there (and will hopefully become available eventually...). Blair's sketches were quite a nice addition to the text. (Pro-tip: you can also follow Doughty on IG and see her own footage!)

These books (and now a whole new reading list thanks to Doughty's The Order of the Good Death website) have made a profound impact on me, and I'm looking forward to how my ongoing exploration will help me become more comfortable with death. I'm already contemplating how I can get more involved. Yeah yeah, I am a total Doughty fangirl now.

Many thanks to Goodreads and the publisher for providing me with this ARC. ( )
  LibroLindsay | Jun 18, 2021 |
It’s sad how ill-equipped and hesitant we are to discuss something so ubiquitous and inevitable as death. Doughty does her part to make us more death-fluent in this supremely interesting look into funerary rituals around the world. She brings both respect and levity to the taboo topic–a delicate balancing act in which she never falters–highlighting different cultures that put in stark contrast the ways in which capitalism, protectionism, and status quo bias hold a tight leash over the funeral industry in the US. ( )
  jiyoungh | May 3, 2021 |
I totally thought that this book was a work of fiction when I initially added it to my TBR, but I was delighted to discover that it was instead an excellent piece of non-fiction which explores a variety of death practices around the world. Some of them are so strange and foreign to our Western/North American mindset that they seem almost fictional in their differences and rituals, but instead of seeing this as a negative and macabre thing I was actually rather charmed. The thesis of the book resounds around the idea that Western culture has become so sterilized and separated in its treatment of the dead that we are not able to experience this last stage of life in a positive or meaningful way, causing undue emotional harm to mourners. The author is a practising mortician and funeral director, but her observation of unhealthy emotional practises around death and a seeming increase in people wanting to explore alternatives to tradition led her on a journey around the world to research, explore, and ultimately participate in a multitude of multicultural funeral practises in an effort to better her understanding of what possibilities are out there - and how these practises affect people. Obviously her study is not meant to be scientific, focusing instead on personal emotional reactions and observations, and in some cases her work could be viewed as voyeurism (our reading about it definitely is), but as a way to get an entrance into the topic I think that this book is an excellent start. Her exploration and resulting reactions are genuine, respectful, and driven by an honest curiosity to learn more about the cultures she explored, and the resulting text is one that piques the beginning of a broader understanding of death. She (and therefore we) may not have all the answers, but the book does much to begin asking the questions and to begin re-evaluating our own personal practises. ( )
  JaimieRiella | Feb 25, 2021 |
I really enjoyed Caitlin Doughty’s first book, Smoke Gets In Your Eyes, so I was delighted to finally get my hands on From Here to Eternity. Every chapter has new meditations on facets of our relationship with death that I hadn’t considered before, bringing even the most bizarre-to-my-sensibilities rituals back into my understanding of our common humanity. As always, Caitlin is both funny and thoughtful, treating every perspective with respect and sensitivity even if she personally doesn’t love the method or philosophy of a certain ritual.

Just before I started this book, I finished Stiff by Mary Roach, and in my review I mentioned a few aspects of it that had become a little dated in the last fifteen years. From Here To Eternity, to my delight, had updates on some of the information presented in Stiff, including human composting, memorials for anatomy lab cadavers, and body farms. It was a coincidence that I read the two books in this order, but I’m glad it turned out this way. Caitlin’s style of writing, with both its sensitivity and dry humor, also reminds me of Mary Roach’s—I can’t remember if she mentioned Stiff on her Ask A Mortician YouTube channel before, but I can definitely see Roach’s influence on From Here To Eternity. ( )
  acardon | Feb 5, 2021 |
Pretty interesting read about how various cultures deal with death and the grieving process. In particular the author conveys how other cultures have a more personal and comfortable relationship with death and death bodies.

This is particularly emphasized by the Indonesian example where the family slept in the same room as there deceased’s corpse for years!

( )
  arashout | Dec 13, 2020 |
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Fascinated by our pervasive fear of dead bodies, mortician Caitlin Doughty set out to discover how other cultures care for the dead. In rural Indonesia, she watches a man clean and dress his grandfather's mummified body, which has resided in the family home for two years. In La Paz, she meets Bolivian natitas (cigarette-smoking, wish-granting human skulls), and in Tokyo she encounters the Japanese kotsuage ceremony, in which relatives use chopsticks to pluck their loved-ones' bones from cremation ashes. Doughty vividly describes decomposed bodies and investigates the world's funerary history. She introduces deathcare innovators researching body composting and green burial, and examines how varied traditions, from Mexico's Días de los Muertos to Zoroastrian sky burial help us see our own death customs in a new light. Doughty contends that the American funeral industry sells a particular -- and, upon close inspection, peculiar -- set of 'respectful' rites: bodies are whisked to a mortuary, pumped full of chemicals, and entombed in concrete. She argues that our expensive, impersonal system fosters a corrosive fear of death that hinders our ability to cope and mourn. By comparing customs, she demonstrates that mourners everywhere respond best when they help care for the deceased, and have space to participate in the process. Illustrated by artist Landis Blair, From Here to Eternity is an adventure into the morbid unknown, a story about the many fascinating ways people everywhere have confronted the very human challenge of mortality.

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